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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 563
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Friday, Dec 22, 2006 - 8:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi, how do you get a horse clean that has 4in long hair that is thicker than a yaks? Winter has left us for awhile and we had 2ins. of rain. Sam found a mud hole and rolled for an hour. It is 35 degrees out and there is no way to bathe him. It is ground in so deep I can feel it on his skin, a good currying will get rid of the top stuff. Should the ground in dirt not worry me? Anyone have any tricks for this? Thanks
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Ann
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Username: Dres

Post Number: 1070
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Friday, Dec 22, 2006 - 8:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

hehehehe.. Oh I have seen much better at getting dirty.. !
in a word... VACUUM..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 564
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Friday, Dec 22, 2006 - 10:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

OH believe me the pic doesn't do him justice. A vacuum is a good idea. I wonder if a goofy arab would hold still for a dustbuster. I don't have a horse vac, and he'd probably plug up my house vac. Might give it a try Thanks.
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2002
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 12:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Now we're showing dirty pictures?! Ha, I'll bet money on my little "Miss Piggy" as to getting the dirtiest! And, she's white, too.

The dust buster probably isn't strong enough. I use a shop vac on my horses! If they aren't used to the vac, start with it not turned on, then turn the vac on, but don't connect the hose and let then get used to the noise. Then use the hose while the vac is on. For some reason it never seemed to really bother my guys...and they are all Arabs.

Because most of my Arabs are gray, if I want them clean, I curry, vac, and then use dry shampoo and brush and rub with a towel. It takes a LONG time and lots of work. Some people use the blow setting on the vac instead of the vac setting, but I'm allergic to dust, so I only use the vac setting. Good luck!!
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Martha Calkins
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Username: Tipper

Post Number: 29
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 10:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I use a shedding blade/ring when ours get armor plated with mud. We don't get much rain here in Tucson but when we do our guys love to wallow.
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Fran C
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Username: Canter

Post Number: 791
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 10:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I bet Sam is VERY pleased with himself! If he doesn't like the vac, let the mud dry and then curry, curry, curry...and count your blessings he's not a white horse!
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2004
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 10:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've read that horses are related to Tapirs (sp?) Are the also related to pigs?
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 565
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 11:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

lol I curry til my arms go numb. Then the pig just goes back and does it again. He doesn't have a normal coat, I believe he is early cushings, it is so long and thick and I have to clip him in the spring. The other 2 are easy to get clean.

I had them locked in the paddock for the freezing rain and he had the nerve to lay down and roll in the limestone, right in front of me! So he also has ground in limestone in that mess.

Yes he is very pleased with himself. He looks like a cement truck backed up to him and covered him. sigh...
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Alden Chamberlain
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Username: Alden

Post Number: 376
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 11:40 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Diane,

If you not going to a big show soon just leave them muddy and happy. As they roll over the next few weeks it will rub it all off anyhow :-)

Good day,
Alden
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 567
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 11:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oh Alden don't think I haven't tried leave it be, we don't show. This particular horse packs mud on mud and never comes clean, the other 2 do because their coats are normal. I worry about skin disease with this one. Otherwise I would ignore it, or try anyway, because he loves his mud.
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Susan M. Herrick
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Username: Quatro

Post Number: 460
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 3:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

OH MY! I can certainly relate! I was in the barn for hours last night, brushing, scraping, etc etc.
Levi must have been running, and did a "slippy-slide" ride by the way he looked. It was caked on, dripping mud. Happy Horse though. Not as long on the hair, so much easier to brush out, but I sure was eating dust!
MERRY CHRISTMAS - I am just happy he is with me to be a little mud bucket!
suz
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Linda Christian
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Username: Savage

Post Number: 137
Registered: 5-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 3:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Boy I can also relate to the mud and dust. My leopard Appy would only lay down and roll to one side so when he got up he looked like an Oreo cookie! white filling on one side and the chocolate cookie on the other side. He looked like some ranch pony in Colorado in the winter time, the mud looked like huge brown drops hanging from his coat, but his face was clean!
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 569
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 3:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I started currying Sam and got one side of his neck done and he got mad cuz' it hurt. I am afraid it will take days to get that mess untangled. On the other hand the horse that is behind Sam in the pic is all shiny now and looks like summer. Sam is still all matted and, well quite frankly stinks. This is a pic of Hank after a LITTLE brushing. If only Sam was this easy, I really don't know what to do with him.
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Ann
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Username: Dres

Post Number: 1071
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 4:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post



On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots.
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Shelley
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Username: Sswiley

Post Number: 333
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 4:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I would just do your best and then put a light sheet or blanket on him. I know he does not need anything with all that hair. The only place they tend to get skin problems seems to be on their backs, and a sheet should take care of that. Then of course you could just run the sheet through the car wash . . . !
I call my gelding "shake-n-bake", he is an expert roller and very proud of his skills. He is one of those horses that has COMPLETE control over the rolling process. . . . both sides equally, then he does this funny thing with his head and just cakes his entire front of his face all the way between his ears.
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Sharon
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Username: Shanson

Post Number: 57
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 4:40 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

A metal curry comb like this is the ticket for dried, caked-on mud. It's a real life-saver!

photo
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 570
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 4:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

lol Ann, now add 4ins. of thick yak hair to that and you have Sam. At least their butts stay clean, they haven't figured a way to get them YET.

Shelley I have considered clipping and a blanket, but so much work and they are out 24/7. I KNOW Hank would rip that sissy blanket right off of him.

I'm not much of a clipper and have considered trying to get 2in. of his hair off and leave 2ins. Is that possible? I'm sure it is beyond my skills if it is, but I am willing to try anything.
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 571
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 4:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sharon that is what I use and I know you won't believe this I already broke one on him. It helps, but it don't quite cut it.
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Carolyn A Burton
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Username: Mcbizz

Post Number: 41
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 5:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dianne, One way I've read about, but have never tried, is to literally soak the horse with baby oil and leave it on long enough to soften the caked mud. Then go after it. Doesn't wreck the hair either. I use Mane and Tail Detangler for the mane and tail and it works on very badly messed up ones.
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Liliana Velasco Ariza
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Username: Liliana

Post Number: 320
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 5:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Diane,

Remember horses make their own coats out of mud when it is cold at night. Have you tried a New Zeland rug? I know they are not cheap but at least you can still ride if you want to, as there is only neck and legs to worry about! After all winters do come back.

I don't know if they have them in the USA but they were very common in the UK. This is a link that I have used in the past and they are very reliable!

http://www.rideaway.co.uk
A rug makes life so much easier!

Oh I don't need them now as I live in hell I mean the caribbean were it gets to 90ยช on a cool day!
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 572
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 5:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Baby oil to soften the mud! I'll try it. When I went out to feed once again I took the metal curry to him and it just won't come out. The baby oil, might just do it. I knew you HA members would have great ideas Thanks.
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 573
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 5:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just an after thought, I wonder if I sprayed him with Pam no stick spray the mud would not cling so much. Hmmmm I can just picture my muddy and greasy horse.
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Lee
Member
Username: Paul303

Post Number: 819
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 8:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

You know what, Diane? The dog groomers should know how to clip 2 inches off a 4 inch coat. They do those fancy trims all the time. There has to be clipper attachments - they can't do it all by hand.
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Alden Chamberlain
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Username: Alden

Post Number: 378
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 10:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Diane,

I have a couple who are serious about their mud, but they've never had skin problems. I'd be careful about applying anything that might reduce the insulating value of their coats, the cold weather isn't over yet :-).

As far as I can tell the mud doesn't affect the coat's insulation value, my piglets all seem very comfortable when it gets cold.

Good day,
Alden
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Margy
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Username: Annaspop

Post Number: 16
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 11:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think this is what you are thinking of: http://www.carealotpets.com/item-detail/?ItemID=000000000002893
I haven't seen them for the large animal (body).
Margy
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 1074
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 11:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

How often do you ride in the wet/ winter / muddy months.. ?? What I have done with a few of my pasture mounts is just do a saddle groom.. So when I bring them in for a ride, I pick out the hoofs, and groom where the saddle will go and leave the rest along.. OK so the horse is not very pretty, but you can ride a dirty / muddy horse as well as a freshly groomed / clipped horse too..
That being said.. My horses that I try to ride daily, I do a trace clip, much easier to keep clean and of course they have to wear a blanket...ALL the horses get their yak hairs trimmed several times a winter.. around the jaw/ throat latch / fetlocks / behind the 'elbow' by the girth area.. oh and LONG ear hairs!!~ * No I never clip nose hairs.. hehehee..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 575
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Saturday, Dec 23, 2006 - 11:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I don't ride much in the winter, especially Sam as he sweats too much with all that hair. Hank is my winter horse.

I really am not a grooming freak it's just Sam's coat is so thick and long that it curls. I presume he is early cushings as he don't shed out completely either. That is why I worry about skin disease with him. Otherwise he could stay muddy and stinky. His coat is literally like thick sheep hair.
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Lee
Member
Username: Paul303

Post Number: 820
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Sunday, Dec 24, 2006 - 11:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, Margy, so THAT'S the secret. Hey Diane, maybe you need a FLO-BEE ( as seen on TV )!!!!
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Diane Edmonds
Member
Username: Scooter

Post Number: 584
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 11:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well I didn't get the clippers or the horse vacuum on my Christmas list. Sam has been de-mudded to the best of my ability. He still has imbedded chunks that I will try to get with the baby oil. It is suppose to rain all next weekend again so I suppose I will go thru this again.

For you clipping gurus, Sam starts getting a very thick coat in Aug. if I clipped him then would he still grow a winter coat that would hopefully not be so thick?
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2012
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 11:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think to prevent hair growth you have to blanket and keep him under lights about 16 hrs. per day. Light has to be strong enough to easily read by.

One of my older mares that I like to still ride I start blanketing as soon as the weather starts to cool and days get short. I don't keep her under lights as I want some hair. She still grows a pretty good coat, but nothing like she'd grow if I didn't blanket her. I usually clip her where she gets really sweaty and leave the rest. I bathe her and liberally spray her with Show Sheen (or similar product) every where except where the saddle goes. This make the dirt much easier to clean off.

The think with blankets is that you have to be consistant; it's a lot of work. Some days they need a light turn out, other days a heavy blanket. You can't skip a night because you're tired or going to be out of town.

On a Cushing horse you may still need to clip with blanketing, but the coat won't be quite as long and heavy and will be cleaner and easier to clip.
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 585
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 12:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks sara, I worked at a boarding barn full time for 10 yrs. I know about the switching blankets, for 30 horses. It use to drive me crazy.

I was hoping that maybe I could clip this boy around Sept. and he would still grow enough hair for the winter? I do want to avoid blanketing if possible. I am almost positive Hank would rip it off of him. The 2 boys play pretty hard.
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Margy
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Username: Annaspop

Post Number: 17
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 12:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, Lee that is one of the secrets. However It is the only one I know for clipping dog coats. When I do it never looks as good as the groomers' clips, but it is a whole lot cheaper.
M
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diane sibley
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Username: Dsibley

Post Number: 74
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 12:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

What about a good spray with Show Sheen once you get him clean? I remember an ill=fated bareback ride that I took once after I had bathed my mare and sprayed her down with the stuff. It's like Teflon...maybe would help the mud come off easier. It sure made my butt slide!
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 586
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 1:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I wish I could get him clean! Here are pics of "clean Sam" after almost a week of currying. The dry mud on him is like cement and will not come off.

I can knock this kind of mud off of the other 2 with no problem. With this "cushings" coat it is all tangled and matted to the 4in. root.

I have used the metal curry and a undercoat comb, I think prevention may have to be key here, cuz' this isn't coming out!

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Ann
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Username: Dres

Post Number: 1075
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 3:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

YIKES.. !!!!!!

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Aileen
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Username: Sunny66

Post Number: 1556
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 5:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I only have one option for you... pray for rain :-) then get out there in your rain slicker with a hair brush and a LOT of leave-in detangler/conditioner and brush his hair
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 587
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 5:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Aileen funny you should mention that! I just got back from buying some infussium leave in hair conditioner and a spray bottle. I am going to mix warm water and the conditioner together and spray his matted hair. Then put a cooler on him and hope that hair dries before nightfall. I think if I just get the top layer wet we should be ok.

He gets better conditioner than me sigh.....
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2013
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 6:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Good luck, Diane! If your plan works, I'm going to suggest it to the owner of the 28 yr. old retired endurance horse I board. When I went out to clean stalls today Bimbo looked just like your Sam...except he's white! Hehehe...he doesn't belong to me..he's owner gets to clean him up! I'm so glad I left my old girl's blanket on today! Gosh, isn't winter fun?

About the clipping in early fall...I'm not sure, but d think he's still grow a really heavy coat. It's amazing how fast a horse can grow that long heavy hair.
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Aileen
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Username: Sunny66

Post Number: 1557
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 26, 2006 - 8:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

LOL, Diane... make sure it's a stiff hairbrush :-) good luck!
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Corinne Meadows
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Username: Corinne

Post Number: 677
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 9:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I don't think you have to mix the infussium leave in with water....we all use it at the barn regular strength on our guys and don't dilute it and it does not irritate the skin.
And if you had to dilute it I'd have no hair by now! LOL :-) I think the hardest part once he is wet and clean is going to be the drying....I have and old hair dryer at the barn to speed things up but it does take a while. Good luck.
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Dawn Winans
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Username: Dwinans

Post Number: 77
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 11:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I body-clip professionally and I believe that if you clip him early in the season he will grow enough fur to go through the winter without blanketing.

My vote is definitely for the clipping - much less work than scrubbing for weeks on end! I would even prefer to clip off the muddy hair rather than scrubbing! I know that blanketing is a pain but it is sooo nice to do a quick rub rather than scrub after riding.

Good luck!
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 592
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 3:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It WORKED! The infussium and the undercoat brush did it, and he smells good. He's drying now and hopefully don't roll, I didn't put on a cooler, as I think the sunshine will dry him faster. If he is dry when I feed I will get an after pic.

Warning do not use baby oil! I put a couple drops on one chunk that would not let go and that spot turned into an oily muddy mess, that won't come clean.

Sam has been growing this coat for a few years and I have not had problem, it is this crazy weather. The ground should be froze and it should snow instead of rain! They are predicting 2 in. of rain again this weekend so I am glad I found something to clean him. Personally I'll take the rain any day over a foot of snow, but it is hard on all the animals. THANKS EVERYONE
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Erika L
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Username: Erika

Post Number: 623
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 3:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Diane, just read this post after not being on for several days. I always clip my hairiest mare in September. By January she has plenty of hair to go without a blanket. Lots easier than trying to keep the angora clean.

Also the Show Sheen/ Laser Sheen works great, too. But you have to apply it every couple of weeks to be effective.

If it is warm enough to rain--you can go ahead and bathe him--as long as YOU can take it! Just use the silicone treatment and put a wool blanket on him, and tie him in his stall until dry.

Shop vac's great too. They get used to it in no time!

In other words, all the suggestions you've already heard are great. Now explain to me why I wrote this long post?!

But does anyone know where to buy a curry attachment for a shop vac? I've only seen them for the the horse-made vacs, and their prices are ridiculous!
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2022
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 5:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I bought a dog grooming comb/brush attachment and it fits both the shop and house vacs. If I remember right I found it at Walmart, but it might have been at Petco. The only ones I've seen in the catalogs are those included with vacuums.

On the subject of cleaning horses, do any of you have an instant hot water heater for horse bathing, and if so do you like it? and what brand?
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 593
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 5:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

After pics, not perfect but MUCH better

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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2023
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 7:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

You must have cheated and snuck in a clean stand-in for your horse, Diane!
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Tonya Bauer
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Username: Pbauer

Post Number: 166
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 27, 2006 - 9:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Diane,

Wow, you did a great job...now he's Mr. Clean!

How did you do it? Are you going to use a blanket? I want to share your success with other riders in the storm :-)

Thanks for sharing the pictures.

Tonya
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Diane Edmonds
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Username: Scooter

Post Number: 594
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 6:31 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Tonya, I used the infussium leave in conditioner. I put it in a spray bottle and let him soak for a few seconds, I just did a small section at a time.

Then I loosened what I could with the metal curry, followed by a mane & tail rake. It came out pretty good I had to fight with a few spots. The infussium made a big difference!

For the finishing touch I sprayed my soft brush and ran that over him, I was VERY impressed how that lifted the dust out. I even did my other horses with that.

If any of you are looking for a way to remove that ground in dust it works really well. It doesn't seem to leave them slick like show sheen.
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2024
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 10:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Next trip to the store I'm stocking up on Infussium!
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Joanne M. Friedman
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Username: Jmarie

Post Number: 10
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 10:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wow! What a great hint! I'm going to try this. I've used Infusium during the summer for tails, but never tried it for mud. I have to say that this prolonged mud season has finally forced me to blanket in self-defense. ARRRRGH!
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Tonya Bauer
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Username: Pbauer

Post Number: 168
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 11:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Diane...Thank you!!
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Lori
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Username: Maggienm

Post Number: 308
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 11:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My goodness what a lot of work you did. He looks great now. What breed is he?
He has very low black markings on his legs for a bay.
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Cyndy
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Username: Hpyhaulr

Post Number: 6
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 12:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Diane,
Thanks for the pix and super tip!

LOL LOL y'all buy up all the infusium you can get... it's already on my shopping list today too. Then I am checking the stick quotes
We are in northern South Carolina and blanket every night under 45-50 +/- ... some have built almost no coats, some are a bit thick. I have lightweights, midweights and heavyweights. It is a colossal pain, but better than my guilt trip. Our Dec-Feb temps can vary about 30-50 degrees difference in terms of daytime/nightime. Our pony and minis and donkey all have wooly behemoth coats, but when it goes down into the low 30's and high 20's, even they get blanketed. It SERIOUSLY dictates my day/night schedule and we find ourselves checking the weather forecast 3 times a day (and curse at weather.com a LOT). Sometimes we have to wait until midnight to blanket, waiting for the temp to drop enough knowing that it will be 32 by 5 am. That is where I draw the line, I am NOT going out there at 4 am to blanket for an hour! Especially when I am out there feeding by 6:30!
Saturday will be 76/55 with T-storms. I will have my shampoo/infusium and raincoat ready. AWESOME!
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Susan Ragan
Member
Username: Srfotog

Post Number: 9
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 12:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I need to ask a dumb question because I am probably ADD and missed it somewhere. Why are you cleaning this horse? They put mud on themselves to keep warm, is my understanding. The mud is insulation. I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I have left mud on my horses for that reason.
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Joanne M. Friedman
Member
Username: Jmarie

Post Number: 11
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 12:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

HA! Well, Susan, I'm not answering for the OP here, but somebody'd better teach my guys to roll on BOTH sides if it's supposed to be insulation against the cold. . I always figured it was just an extension of the rolling reflex--back-scratching, stretching, whatever. Some of my horses go all the way over, but most of them always roll on the same side, but are very careful to dig their heads and ears into the mud. I have mine at home, so I have the luxury of being able to brush them daily, and they never really accumulate a good coating unless I'm gone (or lazy) for a couple of days. I wouldn't worry about the mud coat myself if it weren't for the fact that 1) I do, occasionally, blanket, and blankets over mud can wear off the hair, and 2) there's stuff other than clean mud packed in there. They can smell really awful sometimes if they picked the wrong spot to roll. That can't be good for their hides I'm guessing.

I did notice that since I put "equestrian sand" (a washed-sand by-product of cement manufacture) in the ring, they opt to roll there more often than in the pasture. I have no idea what that's about, but it makes them soooo easy to clean up! It's almost like they're grooming themselves as it dries the mud and abrades some of it right off. Lousy footing as it freezes too easily, but the grooming thing is a nice trade-off.
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Carolyn A Burton
Member
Username: Mcbizz

Post Number: 45
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 2:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The type of soil is the key here. Our's is very sandy and porous, so even if the horses get mud caked, it's always temporary and mostly gone in a day or two. Folks that live lower in the valley have a lot of clay in the soil and it seems to never drain, mud holes all winter. Their horses are caked until spring. My boys love to roll luxuriously, both sides. Adding sand to poor draining soil is a very good idea. And the sand is good for the skin...people "bathe" in sand in the Sahara desert.
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Diane Edmonds
Member
Username: Scooter

Post Number: 596
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 2:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Susan the reason I was worried about the mud is the rain rot factor. I believe he has cushings and is more prone to skin infections. Last spring he did get a very mild case.

Sam got himself pretty muddy again today and with the infussium in there he cleaned up much easier.

Insulation he don't need with all that hair. Hank my horse with the normal coat is standing outside all mud packed and I don't worry about him....he has normal hair and I knock the mud off in couple minutes.

I have to wonder if mud is insulation as I always thought the coat fluffed up for insulation?
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Diane Edmonds
Member
Username: Scooter

Post Number: 597
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 2:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lori he is an arab x. When he "sheds" his black on his legs go up much further. Thanks to his new "cushings" coat he has feathers like a draft, of course they cake with mud also.
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Diane Edmonds
Member
Username: Scooter

Post Number: 598
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 2:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

This is from Dr.O." winter care article

Good nutrition, regular deworming, and good grooming will all help maintain a healthy winter hair coat. Do not underestimate the importance of regular brushing. A dirty, matted coat loses much of its ability to insulate.
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Lori
Member
Username: Maggienm

Post Number: 309
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 7:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It is my understanding that a horse will roll for a variety of reasons; itching, mud protection from insects, it feels good.
When the weather gets cooler a horse's hair will puff up; this puffing traps air which acts as an insulator.
Mud will prevent this from happening so should be removed as best as possible under winter circumstance.
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ilona armoni
Member
Username: Ilona

Post Number: 314
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Thursday, Dec 28, 2006 - 11:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Diane,
I am beyond impressed, you have inspired me to take on my big boy tomorrow...infusium in hand (I use it on my hair, never thought I would be sharing salon products with my horse!)
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Diane Edmonds
Member
Username: Scooter

Post Number: 603
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Monday, Jan 1, 2007 - 2:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

We had our rain all weekend again, and Sam once again took his mud bath. With the infussium on him he brushed out better than the other guys! If you have horses with heavy coats, I can't recommend this enough!
Sam is going to get spritzed once a week with it, and I might just borrow some for my hair
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Erika L
Member
Username: Erika

Post Number: 626
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Monday, Jan 1, 2007 - 7:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sarah, thanks, I am going to Walmart to look for that vacuum attachment tomorrow!
I don't have a portable hot water heater, but I installed a small conventional one in the pump room of my barn. It is the best thing ever! I can give baths without freezing myself, and it is so convenient for the warm Senior mush that I feed my old guy (horse, not the husband). It runs around $100/month for lights, heat for the pump room, and the water heater for electric bill. Small price to pay for not hauling buckets from the house.
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Ilona A
Member
Username: Ilona

Post Number: 325
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Monday, Jan 1, 2007 - 8:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sara,
I do have a hotwash that I LOVE..I've only just noticed your request for info about it...I will look first thing tomorrow morning for its details. I got it barely used from a facility that closed down, best thing I have done for a long time. My one horse would throw me the very evil eye when I tried to bath him with cold water, with this, he stands with eyes almost closed in absolute nirvana!
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Judith L Gordon
Member
Username: Jgordo03

Post Number: 141
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 2, 2007 - 2:40 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ilona and Erika,
I am hot water envious...It rained 2 inches here over the weekend, and now I have a mud monkey for a horse. I think we should all take pictures and put them in the Art and Entertainment section under "Dirty Horse Pictures". Infusium is on my shopping list for tonight.
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Cyndy
Member
Username: Hpyhaulr

Post Number: 18
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 2, 2007 - 4:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

GROAN... hot water wash... I am appropriately jealous. I was thrilled when he ran electric and water to the barn...now I want hot water... he looks at me like I have LOST my mind. We have a problem leaving them out in the pasture in the heavy rain and mud. Simply because I am so afraid they will take off for a run and someone will get hurt slip sliding in the mud.I know, I am too rigid and devote FAR too much time indulging in what ifs...We have 3 days of rain coming at the end of the week.
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2032
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 2, 2007 - 5:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Erika, how large is your water heater?

Cyndy, I worry constantly also about horses slipping in the mud; that is the way Maarissa injured her knee. She spun and only the top half of her leg turned, the lower half stayed stuck in the mud. Granted, we have terrible, thick, clay mud here and the year she got hurt was the worst I'd ever seen.

Lonnie is a retired electrician and has rewired the barn; hopefully he can be talked into a hotwater heater of some kind. I liked the idea of the portable ones so I could also take it to shows. Maybe I need two! Ha! Trust me; I'll be thrilled with one or the other!
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Sullivan's Cutting Horses
Member
Username: Sully

Post Number: 86
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 3, 2007 - 12:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Have you thought about an instant water heater? They hang on the wall and take up very little space. My sister has had one for about 5 yrs or so and it works great!! When my old holding tank style finally goes, that is what I am putting in my house.
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Joanne M. Friedman
Member
Username: Jmarie

Post Number: 23
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 3, 2007 - 10:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sully, doesn't an instant water heater require a gas line hookup? I looked into those a few years ago, but we don't have natural gas access here (too far out in the twigs ) and I didn't have a good, safe place near the barn to put a propane tank. If you tell me they've got electric ones out there, I'll be your slave for life!

I love my Hott Wash . . . to a point. The lag time for heating the water is about 10 minutes, and it's only a 4-gallon tank, which means I have to have the horse standing around in the wash stall waiting for the water to reheat to finish the final rinse. Granted, I could be a sport and go for the bigger Hott Wash, but the price is close to that for a small standard hot water heater, which would be much nicer to have.

BTW, not to digress, but two years ago I added radiant heaters to the barn--over the wash stall and where the farrier works--and have never been happier. The horses dry more quickly (even the soggy, muddy ones) and the surgeon who gelded my mini on a cold, rainy day in October was beside himself with glee when I cranked up the heater and we were all toasty warm for the whole two hours of surgery. Not a cheap addition, but worthwhile.

If anyone is thinking about going this route, order the heaters and rheostats direct from KalGlo and let your electrician install them. It's much cheaper than letting the electrician supply the parts. And if you think you might want to add more--say over a retired horse's stall or a layup/foaling stall--have the wiring put in at the same time with an outlet so you can order the fixture later and just plug it in. You'll save a lot that way, too.
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Judith L Gordon
Member
Username: Jgordo03

Post Number: 142
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 3, 2007 - 11:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Joanne,
I found a point of use one at www.boschhotwater.com/StartPage/BoschHotWatercomHome/PointofUseProducts/tabid/33 3/Default.aspx. I haven't looked at the price, but it has to be less then a whole house tankless water heater.
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Joanne M. Friedman
Member
Username: Jmarie

Post Number: 24
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 3, 2007 - 12:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Outstanding, Judith! I'll be your slave for life. I don't see prices on the website, but I see they're carried by Lowe's, so I'll go in person to check them out.

Thanks!
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Lee
Member
Username: Paul303

Post Number: 825
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Thursday, Jan 4, 2007 - 2:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, I have a 10 gallon electric one. It's 3 years old and has been great! Got it at Home Depot. Not expensive.
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Susan Ragan
Member
Username: Srfotog

Post Number: 11
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, Jan 4, 2007 - 1:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I love that post about the radiant heater keeping the vet warm for a 2 hour operation to geld a mini. I thought, "Boy, that mini must have had a lot of balls."
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Erika L
Member
Username: Erika

Post Number: 629
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, Jan 4, 2007 - 2:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ha ha, Susan!

Sarah, I don't know the gallons of my water heater, but it is about 3ft tall and maybe a foot and a half wide. Not nearly as big as the house one. But I have never run out when using it on horses. Just insulate it so it doesn't freeze if your power goes out.

Joanne, You've started a whole new envy...how much were the Kalglo's? I was on their site and many others and no one tell you the price without making you fill out a whole info sheet (and I hate that), figures, it's horse stuff--it's all expensive!
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Joanne M. Friedman
Member
Username: Jmarie

Post Number: 27
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, Jan 4, 2007 - 3:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ha! Susan, that was great! And you're right. . . at 8 years old he had balls of iron!

Good for me, Erika!

I don't recall the exact price of the Kalglo's, and I'll bet they've gone up since 11/2004. You really do have to visit the website or call for the catalog. You'll need to price the exact ones you want, and there are several types. Get the catalog, then call your electrician and ask what he recommends for your barn so you'll be pricing the right unit. The installation, without the cost of the heaters, was $900, but my electricians are expensive and that included the installation of two caged stall lights and three double GFI outlets as well, not just the heaters. The original installation estimate for the heaters was about $600. Considering how much use I've gotten out of the heaters (and the fact that I'll drop that much on a saddle on eBay just to try it for fit), I'd say they're well worth the price. I had the one over the center aisle wired with a plug and outlet so I can replace it myself without having to call the electrician back. As it's the one we use most (my shoer likes comfort ), I figure it's the one more likely to burn out.
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 2057
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Friday, Jan 5, 2007 - 11:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Erika, sounds like your water heater is maybe 50 gallons. I'm going to check them out at Home Depot. I'm getting some shelving put in the tack room and it would be a good time to put in a water heater.

I'd still like one of those portable ones to go to shows. It's been pretty nippy in the early morning hrs at some shows and I just hate bathing horses then, but with a white(gray) stallion, even with a sheet or blanket, he gets green spots.

Judith, I like the look of the Bosch water heater.

btw - if you are going for radiant stall heaters, or any other electrical upgrades, make sure your barn has the proper wiring with proper voltage and amps. It's dangerous to overload your wiring, and many barns have the minimum. You can run separate service into the area where the heavier duty wires will be needed and have a separate box installed for it. An electrician can do the installation but the box will need to be inspected by your utility company in most areas. For us to put in an extra heavy duty box it ran about $400.

We have two stalls with radiant heat and I love them for sick horses, new foals, etc. In Truckee we had them in a couple of stalls and in the tack room. I slept under one when on foal watch and it really helped keep me warm.
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