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Discussion on How long should horses be left without water

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Mary Maddox Heumann
New Member
Username: andreth

Post Number: 1
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 9:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello. I am a beginning rider new to horse ownership. My horse is boarded with my riding instructor, who also gives him intermittent training. This woman loves and knows about horses, but she is overworked. This afternoon, after riding, I brought the horses in for their grain then placed them in paddocks with hay for the night. While I was doing this my instructor arrived home from work. Before leaving, I asked her if I should check the water trough in the paddock where my horse is kept. She said no, the horses would be okay until morning and she would take care of it then. I checked anyway. There was no water whatsoever in the trough, so I stuck around and filled it. The horses came over immediately to drink. One drank from the steam from the tap. The articles on this site indicate horses can safely go for a time without water, but I want my horse to have the best possible care. Can a more experienced horse person tell me whether I'm fussing too much about the lack of water overnight? Thanks.
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Lilo
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Username: lilo

Post Number: 395
Registered: 4-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 9:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I do not think you are fussing too much. My mantra is: water is the most important nutrient.

I make sure my horses have water available at all times. On hot days they drink more than on cooler days, and they might be OK for some time without water, but in my opinion that is asking for trouble. Sometimes it is advisable to add salt to a horses feed, or at least have a salt block available, to encourage the horses to drink more, especially in the winter.

Lilo
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Corinne Meadows
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Username: corinne

Post Number: 907
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 10:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I can't tell you how long they can safely go with out water as I have always been taught they should never be without. Our neighbor learned the hard way as her husband was supposed to water and forgot, and their horse died from colic by the next morning. It may have been a coincidence but I am not about to take any chances. At our first barn since I have owned my horse we had a situation where the tanks would always be dry. And while I was paying board, since there was no other place to board so I couldn't move him, I would often take at least an hour out of my day to fill tanks that were dry because I couldn't live with myself if my horse got sick or anyone elses if I saw a dry tank and left it. Good for you for caring so much. Next time tell the instructor that the tank was dry and If she seems overwhelmed suck it up and offer to fill it. It's worth your time. Perhaps she had filled it that morning and assumed it was still full. I had to fill the tank many many times but it did take the burden off of my mind. That was one place however where I would pay someone else additional to check on my horse daily while I was on vacation even though I paid them to care for him. The barn was eventually sold and we didn't have that problem again and now he lives at a horse hilton and has it better than us!
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Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: corinne

Post Number: 908
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 10:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

P.S. Mary welcome. I joined about a year into horse ownership. This is the money you can spend for your horse. You will find it's priceless.
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Liliana Velasco Ariza
Member
Username: liliana

Post Number: 423
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 10:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

They should always have water or they could get colic, sometimes they can go without food for longer than they can go without water.

Thank goodness you checked!

Liliana
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Holly Wood
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Username: hwood

Post Number: 1872
Registered: 3-2001
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 10:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome, Mary. You will find much good information here at HA.
Clean water, at all times, is VERY important for the health of horses, ESPECIALLY if the horses have just been fed dry feed (hay/grain). Unless we actually witnessed the last time they all took a drink, we have no way of knowing how long they may have gone without drinking.
You were right to check and fill the tanks. I understand the instructor's busy life, but when we have dependents who can't do for themselves, (especially when we are taking care of the dependents of other people) we MUST see to their physical needs before we see to our own. The times when I haven't paid attention to that little voice that whispers "better check on the horses" are the times when I wish I had checked on them.
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Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: alden

Post Number: 396
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 10:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

At home mine have water all the time. During hunting or camping trips we water the stock twice a day and they do just fine.

On the other hand why risk it when there's a hose handy.

Good day,
Alden
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 2420
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 13, 2007 - 11:40 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I totally agree with the other posts. My horses have fresh, clean water 24/7. Sometimes, on a long ride, for instance water is unavailable for much of the day, but I always make sure they have plenty at night and when they are eating. Like people, in hot weather and when working hard they need more water than when they are resting or when it is cold. You did the right thing. A horse can go longer without food than without water.
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Kristin
Member
Username: freshman

Post Number: 43
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 12:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Horses should never be without water. In fact, this is the law. Knowingly depriving an animal of water is cruelty, and neglecting to ensure its availability is just that: neglect. No excuses.

There is no predetermined length of time that a horse can go without water. It depends on the horse,its age and physical condition, the temperature and humidity, the type of feed it is ingesting. But I can say with absolute confidence that from the afternoon of one day 'til the next morning IS TOO LONG.

Horses deprived of water will become dehydrated. Dehydrated horses will colic, become unable to regulate their body temperature, and their organs will fail, etc. Then they will die.

It is beside the point to dwell on how long a horse can go without water, or what will happen when it does. It is abusive to deprive an animal of water. The responsible person, in this case your instructor, can be charged with a crime and suffer legal consequences.

Confront your instructor with your concern immediately. It would also be appropriate to communicate the standard of care that you demand for your horse, and how you will be checking up on her care. Unannounced checking of water troughs, etc. It is also important to state consequences that will result if she fails to meet your conditions. These could include some or all of the following: removal of your horse from her property, filing a legal complaint, etc.
I also think that it is only responsible to share your concerns with fellow boarders. They need to know in order to make similar decisions about their own animals.

I just can't come up with an acceptable reason for something like this. My horse would be gone before sunset.
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jojo
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Username: jojo15

Post Number: 956
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 5:08 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

mary, Is this an ongoing issue? or just one you noticed this one time? who is in charge of feeding the night meal?

I'm wondering before you pull out those handcuffs and cart off this terrible offender, ask her, or other boarders, if this is a normal occurence.

Like you said she is over worked. And maybe needs some help. A periodic helping hand with checking the water might be appreciated. Don't ask, just do. Being overworkd, This is something that can rattle a normal thought. and you caught her off guard.

i don't think a night of water less buckets will cause huge problems for a healthy animal. But, a horse should not be fed without water available, nor worked, and then put away without water available.

My confusion in this post is who is responsible for the feeding? that is the person who also should be responsible for filling the water buckets. And although in a perfect world everything is taken care of to your specifications, more times than not you will have to do it to make sure its done right. Start a buddy system with another boarder to make sure this never happens again, if you can't be there every night, etc.

AND, there are those odd horses that you fill their bucket, turn around and they are empty again. I have seen this working in a 70 horse barn. So, maybe the trainer had just filled them recently. Knowing this, she made that comment.
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barbara
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Username: oscarvv

Post Number: 781
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 8:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Congrats on your first horse and welcome! :-)

All night without water is not good. A few hours sure - though mine always have water. I would think that being grained and having hay for the night would add to the chance of colic.
If the trainer thinks it is OK for the horses to go without water all night, I would keep an eye on the rest of the care and training and I hope it was a one time occurrence.
I had a BO train me into doing most of the chores for my horses or they wouldn't get done. That is not what a boarder pays for. I left that barn.
-B
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TOD
Member
Username: teddyj1

Post Number: 8
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 9:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Mary, Absolutely they must have water at all times. Horses eat fiber, in order not to impact(type of colic), they need water to keep their systems functioning properly,(think constipation). So yes, you are asking the right questions, in fact, my horses eat beet pulp, which is a type of fiber feed that the water in-take is so imperative, I shudder to think what would happen if they didn't have water available all night after they ate.
Good luck convincing someone like this they are misinformed, you could get a very cool reception.
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Erika L
Member
Username: erika

Post Number: 751
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 9:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary, welcome...
I think Jojo has some very good advice for you. If you check the threads that talk about keeping horses at home you'll see how much work it can be. If this is a one time deal, I think she can be forgiven. Perhaps they don't normally drink as much as they did that particular day.

It is great that you filled it though. Like Jojo said, ask around and see if this happens much before you call in the authorities on the overworked owner.

I can't help but think that in the wild, horses usually go to drink only twice a day. The problem is with the dry food, like hay, horses need a tremendous amount of saliva to digest it properly and they can be more prone to colic without enough water.

The person who feeds should always check and fill water.

Maybe a nice non-confrontational talk with the owner would determine if she is able to keep up on chores. If not, maybe you can chip in for the sake of the horses until she can hire some help or until you find a new place to board.
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Linda Lashley
Member
Username: lhenning

Post Number: 195
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 10:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Mary, welcome to HA.

You say she is your trainer, would it be possible for you to trade some chores for training? If she's overworked, maybe she could use a helper and in turn, reduce your training costs. That way you can have peace of mind without feeling like you are being taken advantage of.

Many of us were once new horse owners, myself included. This website is a wonderful tool, whether you have medical questions, training, horse care, or just looking to make some new "horsey" friends. It is money well spent!

Linda
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Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: corinne

Post Number: 911
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 10:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary, Linda does have something there. When I was new to horses even before I owned I worked at the barn five hours a day in exchange for my training. It not only gave me hands on experience that was priceless, it helped me out financially to not have to pay for my lessons. It was a great benefit to everyone involved.
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Dennis Taylor
Member
Username: dtranch

Post Number: 424
Registered: 3-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 11:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary .. welcome to HA. A lot of good people here with a lot of knowledge ... and you will find no shortage of opinions I'm sure.
IMO water is very important to horses and though it may be ok to go overnight without it, there is absolutely no reason to do so. Why take an unnecessary chance. If your trainer is busy, she should still have priorities, and horse care should be # 1. I am a little confused as to whether this is a trainer or barn owner, or combination. At any rate, someone should be responsible for basic care. Training should always come after responsible basic care.

I agree you might offer your services for a little help with your fees. I do this a lot, and works pretty well for me.

Once again, welcome. Where in Illinois are you located? I am a Hoosier.

DT
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Mary Maddox Heumann
New Member
Username: andreth

Post Number: 2
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 11:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks, everyone, for the warm welcome. I've learned a lot from reading posts and articles on this site for the past month and a half.

And thanks for information on watering horses. The situation with the water isn't a one-time occurrence, but it doesn't happen frequently. If my instructor hadn't returned yesterday, I would have gone ahead and checked the water trough for the second paddock as I'd already done for the first. But the farm belongs to her. Caring for the horses isn't my job, and I think she feels uncomfortable when I do too much of the work she's being paid to do. I honestly don't mind. I enjoy taking care of my horse as much as riding him. The instructor and I have become friends so we really should have a straightforward talk, but she's sometimes sensitive about having her expertise challenged. That would be preferable to calling the authorities, though.

There is only one other paying boarder, who has been there longer than me. She knows about the situation. She helped out around the barn when she was still in college and had time, but she's not around much lately. Her relationship with the instructor is prickly. There is a new boarder who keeps her horse there in exchange for cleaning stalls and feeding the horses several times a week. She seems diligent, but she didn't fill the paddock trough yesterday morning. Or maybe she did and the horses drank it empty.

Well, bottom line, I'll have to be insistent. This is not an area with a lot of boarding options, and the instructor has taught me a lot about riding and training. She truly does care about horses and takes care of her own when they're no longer productive.

Thanks again for the information and advice. It helped a lot.
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Mary Maddox Heumann
New Member
Username: andreth

Post Number: 3
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 11:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I live in Charleston, Illinois, Dennis. It's about 45 miles due west of Terre Haute.

The idea of exchanging work for a break on boarding costs is sensible. The new boarder does that, but she may leave once the weather turns nice and she no longer needs an indoor arena. The trainer is short of money, though, and unlike the new boarder I can afford the fee.
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katrina
Member
Username: kthorse

Post Number: 813
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 11:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi I beleive in water available at all times.
However the barn I am in for the last 3 years does not give them water when in their stalls. At first I was terrified. They are in the stalls about 8 hours. I used to go out at all hours to give him water. They are old time horse people. In all their years of horse ownership and boarding horses they have never had one colic. The trough in the field is always full and clean that is there only drinking supply. I have now accepted this and mine and all the horses are perfectly fine. But I would still like 24/7 water however if they dont have it its not as bad as I once thought. In your situation not knowing if water is available is very scary at least I know that they will drink fresh water when they get let out.
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Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1069
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 11:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome Mary!

Guess I am little confused here; why isn't there a big enough water tank(s) provided that they only need to be filled every few days? I am getting the impression that the horses are provided with something that only holds enough water to give them a drink, and then it's empty? A big Rubbermaid Tank would help ease the situation.

And if it's freezing, this women needs to invest in a tank heater. I checked out a place where a horse I had raised was sold to. There was never water for the horses, and in the winter there was ice. Apparently the owner put water in for each horse twice a day and that was it. There was a big beautiful barn, but the horses stood out without shelter 24/7. Point is, lots of good people claim to love their horses but don't really know what it takes to care for them, and not up to MY standards! Providing water 24/7 isn't difficult, it should be the easiest thing to provide along with hay.
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Dennis Taylor
Member
Username: dtranch

Post Number: 425
Registered: 3-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 12:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary ... I am very familiar with your area. I am in Covington, Indiana .. about 45 miles north of Terre Haute.
Welcome once again.
DT
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leslie christian
Member
Username: leslie1

Post Number: 71
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 2:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary,
I am very concerned for the horses there. Especially as summer is coming. Water is not something you can casually supply when one feels up to it.
For me personally my horses life is so much more important than hurting someone sensitive feelings. I feel the reason she is sensitive about things is becAUSE she knows she is slacking off. Its not her expertise that is causing these horse to go without water. Do not let her tell you they are getting plenty of water. If the water trough is empty and they want to drink from the hose they seem pretty desperate. Water troughs should never be empty.
While some horses like to drink from the hose its more play than need. Your horses are doing it because they are thirsty. Please stand up for yourself and your animals. Evewn if she is a friend you really need to do this. Welcome to HA and I wish you, your horses and your instructor the best. Leslie
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Nicole Tucker
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Username: tuckern

Post Number: 171
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 4:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

When I am camping with my horses, they are offered water 3-4 times a day, in the morning before they are fed, when I stop for lunch, when I'm are done riding for the day, and the last right before I bed down for the night. It doesn't take the horses long to figure out that when water is offered, they better get their fill.

At home, my horses have access to water all the time, and they usually only drink 3-4 times a day, from my observations, and usually on the same schedule as when we are in the mountains, go figure, lol.

Nicole
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Ilona A
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Username: ilona

Post Number: 539
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 14, 2007 - 6:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Horses drink the majority of their water within 1 and 1/2 hours of feeding which is why if there is no water available after feeding horses can impact and die from colic. I would be somewhat suspicious of some-one who claims to be a trainer, know and love horses and yet does not know the critical nature of water availability to horses.

I would start looking for alternative care for your horse, as who knows what else this woman considers acceptable that is in fact dangerous for your horse. Especially now that you know this information. It is always primarily your responsibility to ensure care of your horse and not the trainer/property owner where your horse is located. By that I mean if you have concerns you need to take action and trust your own knowledge.
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Kristin
Member
Username: freshman

Post Number: 45
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 12:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The trainer's decline to check and fill the water supply for these horses, leaving them without water from one afternoon til the next morning doesn't like it was a part of any sort of watering schedule or other management routine. My impression is that the instructor was too lazy to go do it. There is a big difference.

I'm very surprised that people seem to be OK with the excuse that this person is "too busy" or "overworked" to ensure that the horses have water. What is the priority here? I guess this lady gives lessons, or trains, or whatever. Does she do that first, then attend to the horses basic needs? That sounds screwy to me.

Having Mary help out this woman is not the answer. What happens when Mary goes out of town, has to work, etc, and can't get to the barn? Is it then her fault that the horses don't have water? That doesn't make sense. The instructor is an adult that chooses to take on the responsibilities that she has. If she is overwhelmed, it is her responsibility to get help caring for the animals. Sorry, but the whole "too busy" excuse is lame. Just doesn't cut it.
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Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: corinne

Post Number: 916
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 9:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O what is your take on this subject?
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 18017
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 10:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Corinne,
Should horses be left intentionally without water overnight? Of course not and Mary did the right thing when she filled the water trough.

There is research to indicate horses do fine with three short periods of watering daily but I don't think it is optimum. This is all covered in the article on watering horses associated with this forum.
DrO
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Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: corinne

Post Number: 917
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 10:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I had a feeling we were steering Mary in the right direction. Thanks Dr O!
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Ilona A
Member
Username: ilona

Post Number: 542
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 10:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I was not suggesting that Mary help out this woman, I was suggesting she find another barn for her horse. I was trying to be polite about it, and so apparently did not convey the point at all.
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TOD
Member
Username: teddyj1

Post Number: 9
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 10:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary, again welcome, I just wanted to reiterate what Angie J , Ilona A, and Kristin had to say, don't be fooled by how much people claim to love and care about their horses when you see this type of indifference, or ignorance, it's just too dangerous in the long run. I am paying dearly for that myself, as I moved to a different part of the country and was having to "trial and error" boarding facilities until I ended with a very sick horse due to the same type of situation you may well be in( I'm not saying you are). Now I have 37 yrs owning horses, plus attended Univ. Fla. back in the 80's and took many animal science courses, and actually bought my horse from my equine nutrition professor who breeds sport horses, so I don't feel like I'm particularly uneducated in the field of horsecare. My point I'm trying to make is, the farm where I was keeping my horse would not listen to my direct instructions regarding feeding(% hay to body weight- 1,400lbs horse-middle of winter), and in a very rapid amount of time, I had a problem which has taken my horse weeks to recover from( gastric ulcers). Needless to say I was able to find a better solution, and my horses are now rough boarded, so I have total responsibility of their welfare. I know exactly how much each consumes, of water, hay, ect... every day, what their manure looks like, any changes whatsoever I'm critically aware of. I love it, but I am working part time now in order to do this.

An average 1,200lbs horse should consume 10-12 gal. water daily. A group water tub would be very difficult to asses who is drinking what amounts per day. I want an individual bucket in their stalls which I dump and clean every day, so this amount can be monitored more accurately.

I certainly hope this gives you some insight into what to look for in horseboarding as well, and when it comes to your horses welfare, they are just like your child in a bad day care- find a good one, or be a stay at home Mom :-)

Best wishes with your new horse!
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jojo
Member
Username: jojo15

Post Number: 958
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 11:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think its a bit difficult to take a hardline stance on something such as this post. There are many factors to it. and still not everything is clear. Is trainer just being lazy? or periodically forgetting as mary pointed out? if she is plain ole lazy, than that is a problem. But what about other areas of reponsibility? can the boarders help out periodically? or should they just up and move when a polite conversation could be the solution? There are so many options outside of being so hardnosed.

i find it surprising people are willing to judge when not all sides are presented. A simple conversation with the trainer is more than likely going to answer marys question. And i'm sure it can be done in such a way as not to embarrass the trainer, since she seems a tad sensitive. Though Mary, sometimes this is not a true act of sensitivity, but a rouse in some ways to throw a person off so as not to confront. Making a person feel uncomfortable though is a red flag. mary, you shouldn't be made to feel that if you do help you are pissing off the trainer.

This Thread opened up the fact that she is not being petty, has a valid concern and it should be addressed. If the outcome is not to her liking, than other ideas mentioned should come into play. like moving. or watering herself. Like ilona said, ultimately the responsibility of any horse is that of the owners. And if said horse isn't being watered to your satisfaction than do it yourself. If this is considered an outrage on the trainers part, than you have your answer. Because what is at issue here? control? or the health of the horse? to me, this is a slight nudge to the owner, suggesting she step up to the plate.
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Muffi Delaney
Member
Username: muffi

Post Number: 97
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 11:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have been away for a while and not updating the posts. BUT.... WATER WATER WATER.. Keep them an available resource. for all the right reasons listed above.
I have warm waterers in the Barn and LARGE Rubber made type waters outside in the paddock area. Two horses can drink up to 10 - 15 gallons each a day.
as for moving your horse or other options? Mary - ya gotta do what you feel comfortable with - If you are comfortable with your trainer, then talk to her about your concerns and your desires for your horse. If you see they are not being met, then make your choices. Doing it your self gets it done - When you are there - but as some one else said - when you are on vacation or working all nite - WHO DOES IT THEN?
a lot to think about. I have my two horses in the back yard, Expensive and a lot of work. and since there are no other horse people in the neighborhood - they have only us to depend on (my husband and I) but I still love taking care of them - going out at lunch time to hug and clean poop. (I work from the house and so does my husband) but it is a lot of work and expensive. so to bring your horse home is somthing you have to think about long and hard. but the Joys of it are undescribable!
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leslie christian
Member
Username: leslie1

Post Number: 74
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 3:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary, as you can tell our horses are like our kids. .We expect them to be treated with the same care. Can you imagine denying a child a drink of water(for god knows how long) cuz your too tired/busy. I think thats why you are getting so many passionate responses to your question.lol
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Mary Maddox Heumann
New Member
Username: andreth

Post Number: 4
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Thursday, Mar 15, 2007 - 9:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sorry I haven't been able to respond sooner. I have been reading the posts, which have been helpful and informative and given me much to think about.

Yesterday I went to see my horse, Tucker, even though I wasn't going to ride. The trough in the paddock was full. The trainer had filled it that morning before going to work. I waited till she came home and brought up my concern about the water. Since the trough is rather large, she assumed there was water left. She was apologetic. She knows the water should be checked. Having known her for over a year (she was the one who found Tucker for me), I'm pretty much aware of why these lapses happen: her work schedule, a distracting personal life, and a tendency to cut corners in various ways. This does concern me, to the point that I've thought of moving to another barn. But we are friends, and that complicates matters. I'll keep an eye on Tucker's care and be assertive when it falls short as well as pitching in to help as much as possible. Next year she'll retire from her job and hopefully be less overtaxed.

I understand about horses being like your children. I love bringing Tucker a carrot and horse treats, probably to the point of spoiling him a bit.

It's heartening to hear from Muffi about keeping her horses at home. My dream is to find a place with a few acres and keep Tucker and one or two companions (maybe older horses nobody else wants to take care of). Land is inexpensive in this area. My husband is a city boy without any interest in horses, but he has been at least willing to consider the plan. Maybe it will happen.

Thanks you, everyone, for the advice and encouragement.
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cindy O'DELL
Member
Username: zarr

Post Number: 388
Registered: 6-2000
Posted on Friday, Mar 16, 2007 - 1:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mary so was mine and they can change in a hurry! All my mare has to do is bat her eye lashes and extra horse treats appear! Having them at your place will give all of you the best possible HOME !! Cindy
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devonhil
New Member
Username: devonhil

Post Number: 4
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Friday, Mar 16, 2007 - 1:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Congratulations on Tucker.

Years ago I bought myself a small school composition book to use as a horse diary. I record names of vets, farriers, horse products, horse books, grain, ...... I record names, phone numbers, weather, my thoughts , opinions, web sites, shoe and deworming schedule.......

There is so much to learn and having the diary has been so useful when the vet decided to move back to Canada or the farrier broke his leg or when the second vet gave double the shots required.

Time and events will tell you whether you have a good trainer. We all make mistakes. In having the diary I see how many mistakes and how it was handled.

Enjoy your boy.
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Wanda Martinez
Member
Username: sonoita

Post Number: 193
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Mar 17, 2007 - 11:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Water is so very important. Plus impaction can occur when eating hay and not having water to help digest.
Good luck Mary, and if I was you I would make sure they always have water.
Happy Trails
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Mary Maddox Heumann
New Member
Username: andreth

Post Number: 5
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, Apr 2, 2007 - 9:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello, friends. This is an update on the watering situation where my horse is boarded. Since the barn isn't far away, I go four or five times a week. I routinely check water buckets in the stalls and the tub in the paddock. Usually the horses have plenty of water, but if a bucket is half empty I fill it, and if it's dirty I rinse it first. I help with picking out stalls if needed. Another rider cleans the barn several times a week in return for stabling her horse and use of the arena, so mainly I just have to clean up after myself. The owner-trainer doesn't seem to mind my additional help. I think she understands it's not a rebuke, but a contribution to the care of my horse. And she's been helping me out in various small ways without expecting any extra payment.

Thank you again for all the information, advice, and good wishes. I'm continuing to learn so much from this site.
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 2545
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 3, 2007 - 12:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Very good, Mary. This sounds like it's working out the way it should work. I know I'd welcome the help if I were the barn owner/trainer. Caring for a lot of horses is a LOT of work! Good help is always appreciated!
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Wanda Martinez
Member
Username: sonoita

Post Number: 211
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 3, 2007 - 12:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I second that.
happy Trails
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