Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Hoof wall separation

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 48
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 17, 2004 - 11:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

DrO and others,

How much of a problem is separation of the bearing surface of the hoof wall? I notice this on the unshod back hooves of my mare, generally only after two or three days of hacking (trail riding), and by the next day the gap has pretty much closed back up. My farrier says it's the natural flexion of the hoof, and appears unconcerned, but it seems to me that infection could creep in?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 10998
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 17, 2004 - 9:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am unsure exactly what you mean Lynn. Once the horn has separated from adjacent areas of horn, it will remain separated: it is dead tissue and just like a crack in your finger nail will not repair. It must grow out and be replaced with noncracked tissue. If the separation is replaced in less than 24 hours it is not a problem.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 49
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Thursday, Aug 19, 2004 - 5:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks a lot for your reply. I'll try to upload a couple of pictures tomorrow to show you what I mean.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 50
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Friday, Aug 20, 2004 - 5:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Here's one of the pics (couldn't fit them both in):separation
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Susan Bilsky
Member
Username: Suzeb

Post Number: 204
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Friday, Aug 20, 2004 - 6:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

That is one amazing picture Lynn! Is this the right hind that you are holding up? If so, it looks like the lateral or outside hoof wall is shorter than the sole. Is your mare slightly cow hocked in the hind end? If your mare is not lame don't go messing with conformational issues. Perhaps you might explore some hoof supplements instead. Sorry for all the questions but would like to know.

Susan B.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 51
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Saturday, Aug 21, 2004 - 4:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Susan - yes it's the right hind. She's perfectly sound - she's quite close behind, which is why we stopped shoeing the hinds (she kept stepping on the extension of the right with her left when turned out, or even in the loose box, and pulling the right shoe off.) So she's been barefoot at the back for a year now, and on Farrier's Formula.
The gap in the wall is what worries me, and it's only come about since we've been hacking (trail riding) more than usual. I'll try to post a pic of the left hind too. Thanks for your reply!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 52
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Saturday, Aug 21, 2004 - 4:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Left hind:left hind
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11030
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Aug 21, 2004 - 8:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Good pictures Lynn. A few questinons:
  • Does a few days or a week of rest and these crack-separations disappear completely?
  • Susans question is appropriate: is the wall wearing down below the sole?
  • What kind of surface are you riding on and for how long and how often.

DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 53
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Monday, Aug 23, 2004 - 6:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The separation disappears overnight, i.e. there's no actual gap the next day, just a slight indentation or groove where the separation was before.

Yes, I think the wall is wearing down, although not yet below the sole.

My usual riding routine (4 days schooling per week on sand for approx. 45 minutes; one day loose-schooling on sand for approx. 30 minutes; one day hacking, only for 30 - 40 minutes as the trails are pretty stony - quite often choose asphalt instead; and one day off) is not the one that has caused the problem. From March to July, however, we had the opportunity to work in a fantastic, top-notch dressage arena. To reach it we had to hack over stony trails and then asphalt. It took half an hour each way, plus half an hour of working in the arena, and we went on average three times a week, so it involved a lot more stress on my mare's hind feet.

In July, I gave her over a month off, and the problem disappeared. I started bringing her back into work with gentle trail rides as usual, rather than immediate schooling, and after 2 or 3 times the hoof wall opened up again, closing however the next day. I'll soon be back in my old routine, but I'm wondering whether the separation will persist now.

I'm not sure whether the farrier (who hasn't actually seen the hoof as shown in these pics - I just described it to him) is right in saying it's normal for unshod hooves to behave like this?

Many thanks for your interest!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: Alden

Post Number: 115
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Monday, Aug 23, 2004 - 7:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lynn, my geldings feet look like this from riding in the desert, he is barefoot all around and as been for three years now. You shouldn't have a problem as long as the foot remains long enough.

I've speculated that the sand is wearing the softer parts of the foot faster than the harder sections and that is the result; but that is just a guess. I just didn't worry about it as long as the horse wasn't sore and he never was even after 36 miles in two days.

Good day,
Alden
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11049
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 24, 2004 - 7:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

So this is occuring with daily riding over stony trails? Alden is right: the white line is softer so it wears down slightly (since it grows out in just a day or two I think the photos exaggerate the depth of the crevass). As long as it does not progressively get worse and the walls do not wear down past the edge of the sole you should be fine.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lynn Lindstrom
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 54
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Aug 25, 2004 - 6:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Alden: Thanks - it's a relief to hear these are not the only monster feet around! She's not sore, except over stony trails, where she's quite ouchy. Change to a smooth surface and she's ecstatic.

DrO: Thank you very much for the assessment. If the walls did wear down past the edge of the sole, I suppose I'd have to give up the barefoot way?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11061
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Aug 27, 2004 - 8:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think you will have trouble staying sound if the horse is walking on his sole without the help of the wall.
DrO
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2014
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC