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Discussion on Removing bot eggs

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Janice C. Beckett
Member
Username: beckettj

Post Number: 30
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 10:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O:

What is the best way to remove bot eggs from my horse's lower legs? Regular brushing doesn't get them. Should I take the time to remove them manually - there are quite a few - or can I use alcohol or some other substance to kill them in place? Thanks!

Janice
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Corinne Candice
Member
Username: corinne

Post Number: 1204
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 11:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Janice,
At the farm I work at monthly, there is a large infestation on the pasture horses and I have never seen these before. The only thing I found that worked to remove them, was while bathing, using a bot knife to scrape them away. It's takes awhile but in one afternoon I was able to clear them off of three horses. I had known what a bot knife was but had never seen bot eggs on horses so had only ever used it to cut baling twine....LOL....they really do work to scrape the eggs off. Prepare however to feel itchy and yucky the rest of the day if you can't shower right away...they totally skeeve me out! They remind me of little lice eggs they way they stick to hair.
Good luck and have fun scraping!

Corinne
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Ann
Member
Username: dres

Post Number: 1546
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 11:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I use a plastic razor, the throw away kind.. i find that works better then the bot knife.. Its a royal pain to deal with and my horses HATE the bots and make the mares go crazy in the pastures..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots.
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AliceH
New Member
Username: alicem

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 11:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

A pumice stone works great on them. Brush/rub the direction of the hair and it takes off the eggs. Some tack stores sell them. But I got mine at Walmart. Best of all they last for years.
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Fran C
Member
Username: canter

Post Number: 1240
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 12:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have used the pumice stone too - works very well and fairly quickly.
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Christine C. Mills in NC
Member
Username: chrism

Post Number: 1188
Registered: 4-1999
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 10:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I use a Slick 'N Easy Grooming Block. One will last you years. After riding and then rinsing the horse off, I use the block by pressing and dragging over the bot eggs. It works very well.

It is also useful for deshedding. Dog folks will use it for thinning coat. I think it is sometimes called a lava rock.

Cheers.
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Janice C. Beckett
Member
Username: beckettj

Post Number: 31
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007 - 11:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the advice everyone! I can't believe that I've owned horses for almost 20 years and have never had this problem before. It's nice to know there's a choice of solutions. It looks like the pumice stone is the most popular, and it sounds pretty easy. Time to go shopping . . . ;>)

Janice
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 19417
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 24, 2007 - 10:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Janice,
All the above are good suggestions but besides these we have other suggestions and important information on bots, particularly since you are seeing heavy infestations. I have just updated the article on bots and you will find it at, Diseases of Horses » Colic, Diarrhea, GI Tract » Parasites and Worms » Bots.
DrO
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Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: alden

Post Number: 463
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Oct 27, 2007 - 7:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Janice,

We started using fly predators a couple years ago and haven't seen a bot egg since. Doesn't help you this year, you'll have to scrap, but something to consider for next spring.

Good day,
Alden
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 19440
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Oct 28, 2007 - 9:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Alden,
Here we have a classic case of a temporal, but not causal, relationship. The fly predators are not known to be effective against bot flies, horse flies, deer flies, and the midges life cycle all which are very different than the house flies, horn flies, face flies and stable flies that are sensitive to the fly predators parasitic ways. Regular use of avermectin dewormers, as you see in our deworming program, will end the bot fly life cycle on your farm assuming no nearby inappropriately treated horses.
DrO
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Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: alden

Post Number: 464
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Sunday, Oct 28, 2007 - 8:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes DrO you are correct, my post was not complete. We worm regularly and our herd is mostly closed, horses that come in for breeding are stabled separate from our personal horses.

But we'll still use the predators in our program, they look to me to be cost effective enough to include. We probably nail the bot flies with by worming the same year we started the predators.

Good day,
Alden
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