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Discussion on Feeding fresh beets

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Hilma Beuchert
Member
Username: dakotab

Post Number: 43
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, Sep 12, 2008 - 10:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Can I feed my horses fresh beets and the greens.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 21356
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Sep 14, 2008 - 12:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Hilma,
I do not know of any reason why not. But it should be noted that they are about 90% water by weight. If significant amounts are fed it should be considered that by dry weight they are high in sugar and goodly amounts of protein but deficient in some minerals and vitamins though rich in folate.

Here is a breakdown from USDA:

Nutrition Information for Beets:
The following nutrition information is for one serving of beets. That would be about one cup of sliced beets, or 136 grams. This general information is for any variety of raw beets.

Macronutrients:

Dry Matter 16 g
Water: 119.11 g
Calories: 58
Protein: 2.19 g
Carbohydrates: 13.00 g
Fiber: 3.8 g
Sugars: 9.19 g
Total Fat: 0.23 g
Saturated Fat: 0.037 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 0.045 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.083 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg

Micronutrients:

Calcium: 22 mg
Iron: 1.09 mg
Magnesium: 31 mg
Phosphorus: 54 mg
Potassium: 442 mg
Sodium: 106 mg
Zinc: 0.48 mg
Vitamin C: 6.7 mg
Thiamin: 0.042 mg
Riboflavin: 0.054 mg
Niacin: 0.454 mg
Pantothenic Acid: 0.211 mg
Vitamin B6: 0.091 mg
Vitamin B12: 0 mcg
Folate: 148 mg
Vitamin A: 45 IU
Vitamin E: 0.05 mg
Vitamin K: 0.3 mcg

Phytonutrients:

Phytosterols: 34 mg
beta Carotene: 27 mcg
beta Cryptoxanthin: 0 mcg
Lycopene: 0 mcg
Lutein and Zeaxanthin: 0 mcg
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Hilma Beuchert
Member
Username: dakotab

Post Number: 44
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, Sep 14, 2008 - 6:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you Dr. O
I tried to give the beet greens to them, and none of them would eat them, I was surprised.
Is there anything on your site about feeding fresh vegetables, and where I can find it.
Hilma
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 4003
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Sunday, Sep 14, 2008 - 8:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'd suspect the greens might have been too bitter for the horses. Our horses like lettuces, corn including the husks, carrots with their tops (of course!) and melons along with most fruits (sans pits.) We also have have one that likes hotdogs with mustard, but I don't think that qualifies as a vegetable!
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jos
Member
Username: paardex

Post Number: 1124
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, Sep 15, 2008 - 4:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Now Sara, had you forgotten food for the poor showhorses together with healthy meals for yourself??A horse on fast food! I'd better take care of the food department for the Nationals
Hilma I didn't reply earlier because I didn't understand what type of beet[I thought the red ones we eat ourselves?]
But we used to give the horses a sugarbeet or fodderbeet when stabled during wintertime at the very least it took time and amused them. With the greens as long as they were fresh after that the greens went to the cows
Jos
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Imogen Bertin
Member
Username: imogen

Post Number: 1185
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Monday, Sep 15, 2008 - 5:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Horses absolutely love both sugar beet and fodder beet. We often give them a few in the winter. They think they are like carrots and relish chomping them up. Mostly we give them just the swollen root not the leaves because of the oxalic acid content in the leaves.

Imogen
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LL
Member
Username: frances

Post Number: 672
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Monday, Sep 15, 2008 - 5:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

None of the horses where I board will eat fresh beet leaves (I mean the ones humans eat), and it can't be bitterness that puts them off because they all adore endive leaves, chicory-type leaves and other similarly bitter greens. In fact, the more bitter the better! They're quite specific about which greens they will eat. Won't touch spinach (quite rightly as I believe it's toxic to horses?), beet leaves or some rather mild, leafy greens that are also sold here. I think they know what's good for them and what's not (in general that is!) I have't tried offering the actual beet itself.
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Hilma Beuchert
Member
Username: dakotab

Post Number: 45
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, Sep 15, 2008 - 9:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you everyone for the input, I tried to give them beet greens from the garden. I guess they are sugar beets. Have not offered them the actual beets.I have had other people call me about beets and pumpkins they have in their garden and wanted to know if the horses would eat them.
I guess your right, they will only eat what they want. Especially when they are as well fed as our horses. They can be picky.
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Imogen Bertin
Member
Username: imogen

Post Number: 1186
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Sep 16, 2008 - 3:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

LL - oxalic acid is also what is in spinach... and rhubarb. But I have never tried a horse on rhubarb!

Imogen
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LL
Member
Username: frances

Post Number: 677
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 17, 2008 - 9:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Imogen - yes you're right. Only in rhubarb LEAVES though I think, so perhaps horses would enjoy a nice rhubarb crumble! (I certainly would - we don't get rhubarb here.)
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Lori
Member
Username: maggienm

Post Number: 757
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 17, 2008 - 2:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

LL I thought rhubarb grew everywhere.

I grew up thinking rhubarb leaves are poisonous, never have checked it out though. But we eat beet greens all the time.
Are the ordinary garden beets sugar beets?
Gosh, never know what you're going to learn here.

love it.
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 4017
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 17, 2008 - 10:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sugar beets are a lot larger than the beets grown in your garden and to me look more like turnips; they are kind of yellow looking, at least the ones I've seen are. I have no idea what they taste like.
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Lori
Member
Username: maggienm

Post Number: 758
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Thursday, Sep 18, 2008 - 9:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

thanks Sara
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