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Angela S
Member
Username: vera

Post Number: 66
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Monday, Mar 16, 2009 - 12:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

So there is this farmer that lives down the road from me that I befriended last summer while working part time at the local farm and home. He came by last night with a round bale that he wanted to give me. Yes, very nice, but it has a lot of alfalfa in it and I don't feed alfalfa at all. Since it was a gift, I had a hard time telling him to take it back so it is sitting in my back yard right now. Would it be OK to mix a small amt of it with my grass hay?
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Shannon
Member
Username: stek

Post Number: 166
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Monday, Mar 16, 2009 - 12:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

So long as the quality is decent (not moldy etc) I would think it would be fine to peel off a little and feed it in limited quantities in addition to your regular ration.

I wish someone would drop off some free hay to me :-)
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Jesse Mitchell
Member
Username: mitch316

Post Number: 58
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Monday, Mar 16, 2009 - 12:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Angela, I mix alfalfa with my hay once per day. I would agree with Shannon on the quality, because round bales have a tendency to become moldy. I know some folks that feed pure alfalfa during show season. I use a good quality timothy, fescue, orchard grass hay, and add about half a pound to a pound of alfalfa, usually during their morning feeding before they are let out of their stalls into the pasture. Since they are not used to it, you may want to just add a little at a time, but I call it "crack for horses" because they love it so much, ha.
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Holly Wood
Member
Username: hollyw

Post Number: 262
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Monday, Mar 16, 2009 - 12:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Angela, do the farmers have to test for blister beetles there where you live? I know that I can't feed alfalfa here in KS unless it has been tested for the beetles, and most of the farmers don't go to the trouble.

I have had bad experience here with round bales being slimy and moldy . . . and baled wet.

Please be careful . . . If it peels off easily and smells good . . . and if you don't have to worry about the danged beetles, then I concur with the other posts. Alfalfa is yummy to horses.
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leslie645
Member
Username: leslie1

Post Number: 656
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Monday, Mar 16, 2009 - 1:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Angela
If the bale is clean. Just reach in it, grab a handful and do the smell test. It should smell and look like a small bale. clean and delicious. No mold, no dust.
I fed 5X5 alf/grass round bales this winter. my guys did great on them. Its an easy and inexpensive way to feed...if your farmer knows how to properly bale large bales of Alf/grass!
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 22567
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 - 12:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Angela,
the article on Alfalfa gives specific recommendations on adapting a horse to alfalfa but you should also consider the effects of the alfalfa on the overall nutrition and the horse's condition.
DrO
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Angela S
Member
Username: vera

Post Number: 68
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 - 10:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I really don't want to feed it at all. My horses are doing fine with the grass hay and a small amt of concentrate. I don't know what to do with this huge bale in my backyard now. I guess I should call my friend and have him take it back. This is hard for me.
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leslie645
Member
Username: leslie1

Post Number: 658
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 - 11:05 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Can you donate it? If you have someway to load it on a trailer.
L
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Holly Wood
Member
Username: hollyw

Post Number: 268
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 - 11:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Have you considered raising Easter Bunnies?? or Easter Guinea pigs?? Got goats? How 'bout a milk cow or a beef calf?
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Julie Masner
Member
Username: juliem

Post Number: 530
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009 - 10:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Could you post an ad on craigslist? "Free hay, you haul" would probably get someone's attention. Sort of seems ungrateful I know.
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 3798
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 - 8:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Angela I am in Il also. Here in the No. part of the state blister beetles are not a problem.

If I were you I would just peel off a little a day and give it to the horses as a "treat" mine love alfalfa and it is good for them unless they are easy keepers and even then, given as a treat should be ok, I do that with mine and they think they died and went to heaven!!! Just be sure to cover it as it can mold easily outside in the weather if it warms up and rains.
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Angela S
Member
Username: vera

Post Number: 70
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 - 10:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

thanks for the suggestions guys:-)
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Fame
Member
Username: npo33901

Post Number: 16
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Sunday, Jul 5, 2009 - 9:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The clover in my pasture has got a white milky covering looking like mildew . Is it safe to let horses eat it ?
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 5153
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Sunday, Jul 5, 2009 - 11:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I would be afraid of it. I don't know what kind of clover it is, but some clovers can get fungi that are deadly to horses.
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Fame
Member
Username: npo33901

Post Number: 18
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Monday, Jul 6, 2009 - 6:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I don't know what kind of clover it is . Will try ti identify it . You are right = it probably is Fungi - I see it also on our wines ( come and taste them in Sept.) . It appears only on one (large) pasture .
Planing to dig out all my pastures and put new seeds in autumn .
I think clover which I have doesn't agree with my horses . They have blisters in their noses - it could be due to the clover .
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 5163
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Monday, Jul 6, 2009 - 5:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Horses can get blisters around their nose and mouth from eating certain weeds as well, I think, as from eating some fungis. Here is a link that has some information, and once on that page, if you go back a page to disorders of the mouth, you might find more info.


http://www.horseadvice.com/horse/messages/4/190350.html
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 23356
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 7, 2009 - 7:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

For more on identifying common clover pastures see, Diseases of Horses » Colic, Diarrhea, GI Tract » Mouth, Esophagus, and Liver » Plant Poisoning and the Liver: Hepatotoxicty.

And more on a common fungus that may present as you descrive above see, Diseases of Horses » Colic, Diarrhea, GI Tract » Mouth, Esophagus, and Liver » Slobbering, Salivation, and Clover Poisoning.
DrO
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Fame
Member
Username: npo33901

Post Number: 21
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 7, 2009 - 11:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you Dr. O. will do .
AM.
Coincidently , my Violino got diarrhea - when I brought him back from the pasture . Put him on different pasture today and will give him minimum of hard food tonight - mostly hay .
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