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Discussion on Peanut hay

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joj
Member
Username: Jojo15

Post Number: 546
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 11:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Any one hear of this? know anything about it? Its all the rage down here (florida, although i can't get any in S. Florida- have to drive to the middle of the state).

i can't find any info on it. All my goat list buddies swear by the stuff for their goats. and they say they feed it to the horses too. It sure would solve a lot of problems in feeding different hays for my different animals. If i could only find a hay that is nutritionally adequate for all. i am getting the impression Peanut hay is it.

Is this just a different name for something on the list already?
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 683
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 12:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I believe I'm right in saying peanuts are a legume like alfalfa is, so I would think it would be a similar hay, but I've never heard of feeding it to horses. Dr O.?
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 12998
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 8:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

New to me to guys, I will see if I can find some info but important is what stage of maturity is it being used at and how is it processed. Do they use just the above ground leafs and stems or the whole plant including peanuts?
DrO
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joj
Member
Username: Jojo15

Post Number: 547
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 9:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

i had the same first questions. its perenial peanut hay and its not the same as peanuts... to me the confusion lies in the name, too.
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Alicia Kost
Member
Username: Aannk

Post Number: 440
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 10:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The very first link that popped up in google had some good information on peanut hay.
http://www.ces.uga.edu/Agriculture/asdsvm/jan99lvst.htm#Perennial%20Peant%20Hay
Alicia
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 686
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 11:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

A good site. Thanks. Live and learn. Wonder what the difference is between peanut hay and the tops of peanuts. The leaves of peanuts look like alfalfa.
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Vicki Zaneis
Member
Username: Vickiann

Post Number: 62
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 11:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Perennial peanut is also called "Florida alfalfa." Horses absolutely LOVE it. It grows well in sandy loam soil and gives us another locally grown option beyond the Bermuda hay. It is both grazed and made into hay in central Florida for horses and cattle. It is used at the stable where my daughter keeps her jumping horse, but is only given to those horses needing a little extra nutrition and energy as dictated by their individual need and workload. Some of the horses receive bermuda grass hay instead if they are "easier keepers." Here it is an alfalfa substitute, but would be interesting to see a more detailed nutrient break down on it. I have also heard it has some benefits with regard to a lesser need for fertilizers and pesticides, as well as no risk of blister beetles.
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joj
Member
Username: Jojo15

Post Number: 548
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 11:23 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Cool.. so its a legume hay?
question is if alfalfa is a hay too high to be giving my older mare, with all the problems it can create in colic and founder, etc.. would the peanut hay be a better substitute. or still asking for trouble if given.

I am going to vero to pick up a couple of bales to see it and test it on the goats....
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Alicia Kost
Member
Username: Aannk

Post Number: 441
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 1, 2005 - 11:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Vicki,
The site I listed has all that. It appears to be a legume hay with less of some stuff than alfalfa. Looks like it is available only in the south, it is a tropical plant. Too bad, it would be nice to have a hay that isn't quite as rich as alfalfa up here instead of getting a mix of it and grass hay.
I am still interested in what Dr. O. has to say.
Alicia
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13005
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Jun 2, 2005 - 7:45 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the references guy, I love it when you bring me something new. First we have to be sure of what we are talking about: hay is made from peanut tops which is different than "perrenial peanut" (PP) hay (read the reference again Sarah). Most likely joj is talking about PP.

Looking at the numbers that Gary provides in the article, I would guess the difference between the PP and the alfalfa are so small that they are almost equivalent. A very good PP would be richer than a mediocre bale of alfalfa. I have not been able to find a well put together nutritional breakdown yet but besides protein and energy it also contains similar Ca and Phos as alfalfa and appears to be slightly more palatible to horses.
DrO
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joj
Member
Username: Jojo15

Post Number: 550
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Monday, Jun 6, 2005 - 1:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

yes, Dr. O i meant PP hay. I emailed a few suppliers but they couldn't answer me either.

The reason i am asking if i can feed to my older mare is that alot of the goat breeders won't feed alfalfa for the same reasons we shouldn't with horses. it's too rich. BUT, they feed peanut hay.

I just wanted to hear from you all what you think.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13064
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Jun 6, 2005 - 8:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

WHOA joj, there are many horses whose work, pregnancy status, growing requirements, poor quality pasture, or metabolic rate make alfalfa a almost irreplacable foodstuff for horses. If they are using PP they are using an equivalent to a medium quality alfalfa hay.
DrO
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Wanda Martinez
Member
Username: sonoita

Post Number: 325
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Sunday, Feb 24, 2008 - 9:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Does anyone think peanut hay will grow in Colorado?
i would love to try.
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Vicki Zaneis
Member
Username: vickiann

Post Number: 591
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Sunday, Feb 24, 2008 - 9:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

From what I have read, the PP is nutritionally equivalent to alfalfa, but it requires less fertilizers and pesticides, which is a definite advantage. It also thrives in rather poor, sandy soils.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20127
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Feb 25, 2008 - 5:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wanda, I would contact my local extension service they may have an idea if this will work.
DrO
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TOD
Member
Username: teddyj1

Post Number: 76
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, Feb 25, 2008 - 9:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

We've fed it to our performance horses in the Gainesville/Ocala area for over a decade. Dr. Sandi Lieb Equine Nutrition Professor at Univ of Fla did many studies on this legume. Back in the day it was $2.50-3.00 a bale !! Great alternative to alfalfa, however I've long since relocated to New England, and have no idea what the going rate is these days.

You can find Dr. Lieb's studies on line, or can contact her directly at lied@animal.ufl.edu and I'm sure she would be happy to answer your questions.
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TOD
Member
Username: teddyj1

Post Number: 77
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, Feb 25, 2008 - 9:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sorry, typed in a d instead of an b,
lieb@animal.ufl.edu is the correct email :-)
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Tonya Bauer
Member
Username: pbauer

Post Number: 401
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Feb 26, 2008 - 9:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Wanda,


Please let your fellow Coloradans know what you find out :-)


Thanking you in advance,
Tonya
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Wanda Martinez
Member
Username: sonoita

Post Number: 326
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Feb 27, 2008 - 10:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Florida Ag. contacted me and said we need at least 120 days of 85 or higher and 65 at night to grow . So he did not think we could grow it.
Darn it all.
Happy Trails
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Jill V. Reed
Member
Username: verlaj

Post Number: 29
Registered: 6-2000
Posted on Thursday, Feb 28, 2008 - 1:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just an anecdote - I live just north of Ocala in Central Florida and have fed perennial peanut hay to my horses for years. They absolutely love it. If fed the hay at the same time as sweet feed, they eat the hay first! They eat every leaf and stem - no waste whatsoever. This year, I have paid $11-14/bale - the price actually went down later in the season this year. Fortunately, my horses normally are turned out on pasture 24/7, so I do not need to feed abundant hay. However, at the current price of $11/bale for peanut vs $7.50-$9 for coastal bermuda, peanut is the winner hands down for value in terms of nutrition.

I have found that the perennial peanut hay rarely has weeds in it, and rarely has mold or dust. Also, as someone mentioned, there is no need to worry about blister beetles. I recommend you try it if it is available in your area. Jill
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Wanda Martinez
Member
Username: sonoita

Post Number: 327
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Thursday, Feb 28, 2008 - 6:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Jill,
I so wish I could. I was down in Tampa and smelled it, it was so sweet. No weeds like you said.
Happy Trails
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Vicki Jackson
New Member
Username: vickij1

Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 9:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Okay I have been watching your chat sessions for a few months now and I thought this would be a good topic to introduce myself. I my name is Vicki Jackson and I have 2 pleasure horses Morgan and Palomino QH. I live in NW Colorado and the winters are brutal! My horses have open barn/shed for shelter and love the freedom. In a former life I owned and raised open jumpers in the NE. I have had these girls for 1 season and this is all new to me. Speaking of hay, I continually have a debate with another owner over whether to feed an Alfalfa/Timothy mix which I and the horses prefer and straight broom or Timothy with Purina adult pellets. I would welcome any informed opinions on this.
Thanks!
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Wanda Martinez
Member
Username: sonoita

Post Number: 329
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Mar 1, 2008 - 6:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Vicki,
I feed one pad alf/mix and one brome twice a day and more brome if it is cold. My guys are 22,20 ish and 14 they are doing fine. I have started feeding my younger guy timothy pellets also.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20160
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Mar 2, 2008 - 10:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome Vicki,
Rather than posting in this discussion on peanut hay you should start a new discussion. But before you do, read the parent article to this discussion section: "Forages for Horses" as it has an in depth discussion on your question. To reach it click on Forages for Horses off the navigation bar at the top of this page. If you do not find your question answered the Start New Discussion button is of the bottom of the article page under the titles of the other discussions in this topic.
DrO
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Tonya Bauer
Member
Username: pbauer

Post Number: 403
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Monday, Mar 3, 2008 - 4:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Wanda,




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