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Discussion on Summer 1999

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Ignacio
Posted on Monday, Jun 21, 1999 - 7:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Could anyone help me to find some literature on the use of infrared lights for muscles pain relief and for hair drying on horese.. Thank you..
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Roxanne
Posted on Thursday, Jun 24, 1999 - 8:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Our horses take a lot of care and record keeping. To keep track of all my records I keep one folder with everything from Coggins to phone numbers. Keep one page with a list of any phone numbers you might need such as vet, farrier, hay, transportation, show committees, etc. Keep all documentation of shots, vet examinations, and any other records that may come in handy. I keep all my show information in this handy dandy folder also. This way when I am ready for a show I don't have to go digging for entries, coggins, the number for transportation. It is all handy right there in that one little book. Makes my life a lot easier on show days.
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jillian
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 6, 1999 - 2:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

In order to win this tips and tricks contest must you be a member?
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Administration
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 7, 1999 - 5:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello jillian,
Nonmember winners receive a free article or if they like they can join and I can add 3 months to their membership.
administration
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Chris Mills
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 7, 1999 - 11:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I keep a necessities "kit" with my trailer.

In it I have some tools I may need at a show or while dealing with the trailer - hammer, big screw driver that can double as a crank for turning screw eyes (used for stall guards, bucket hooks), screw eyes, spare trailer lights, WD-40, vaseline for lubricating trailer ball before hitching, index cards/push pins/marker for posting emergency information on stall door at shows, spare halter, spare lead, bucket hooks, bailing twine, small adjustable wrench, paper towels, hand wipes, bungee cords. I'm sure there are more things that would be useful, but this should get you thinking.

Most of the tools fit in a plastic shoe box from Target.

In case something happens to me (typical mid-life fear), I also have a "hitching checklist" for my husband or any helper to go through as a safety precaution with the trailer.

I also carry on of the "tire changing aids" when I tow. If you have a flat, first loosen the lugs of the spare and the flat tire (use the WD 40 and wait 5 minutes if they are tight). Then put this aid near the good tire on the same side as the flat, either pull forward or back up onto the aid. The flat tire is suspended and you can continue with your change.

Touch wood, I've not had a flat ... but I figure having all the stuff with me and knowing what to do puts the protective hex on my tires, GRIN.

Hope this helps.
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Karen Holmes
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 3, 1999 - 12:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

A little trick I learned this week while treating a hoof abcess on my TB. The vet gave me a poultice to put on the foot after soaking in epsom salts and prior to putting on the Easy Boot. To keep the poultice where it belongs, I take a newborn sized disposable diaper with the velcro tabs (yes! they have velcro now!). I put that over the sole of the foot and then wrap it around and fasten the tabs just under the coronet band. It fits like a glove and holds the poltice on the foot while keeping the foot cleaner than the Easy Boot alone. Best of all, it protects the bulbs and heels from rubbing on the Easy Boot. I have to change the poultice and soak the foot twice a day. When I take the old diaper off, the poultice is just where I left it and I don't have to clean out the boot!!!
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Karen Holmes
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 3, 1999 - 12:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Another organizer and time saver: If you board on a self care basis or have your own place, make up "Emergency Meals" for all of your horses. All you need is one 14 gallon RubberMaid container and a gallon ziplock bag for each horse. Label each tub with the name of a horse and put one evening meal worth of hay into it (They hold about 1/4 of a good sized bale). On top of the hay, lay the gallon bag containing one meal of grain/supplements and then put the lid on. Place it in front of your horse's stall. If you are running late, all you have to do is call out and have someone bring in your horse and give it the feed in the tub. In the meantime, the alley does not have stray hay all over and the other horses that walk by won't munch on your feed. This works great for me as I am frequently "on call". I always know what my horses are getting and don't have to worry that they won't get the right feed. Just be sure to use your tub once a week whether you need it or not so the grain does not mold.

Karen
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Dr. Carol Artlett
Posted on Thursday, Aug 5, 1999 - 1:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tired of having wet smelly sponges hanging around the wash stall and nowhere to keep those shampoo bottles? Hang in a corner of the wash stall a 3 tiered wire basket (you know the kitchen type for fruit etc). It allows the air to circulate aroung the sponges so they dry out properly. It also holds lots of bottles, scrapers and all those other necessities in easy reach.
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Chris Mills
Posted on Wednesday, Aug 18, 1999 - 1:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Does your horse suffer from the "cold shudder" when you wash it off with hose water? Clamps its tail down tight when you accidentally hit a sensitive area with cold water? Fidget and dance when you are trying to hose off the sweat on a hot day?

Do you horse a favor. Buy a large black bucket, fill it up with water and place it in the sun before you ride. The suns rays will provide a little solar warming ...

After you ride, you will have a nice, tepid water to sponge your steed off with.

One more way to earn a nicker when you arrive.

Cheers.
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Bruce C. Kramer
Posted on Wednesday, Aug 18, 1999 - 9:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Jolene -- I got this recipe out of Horse and Rider Magazine - May 1999:

In a 2 liter bottle, mix:
1 cup Avon Skin-So-Soft
2 cups white vinegar (I used apple cider as well)
2 cups water
1 TB eucalyptus or citronella oil (available at health food stores)

Generously spray or rub the solution on your horse daily, being careful not to get it in the eyes.

P.S. I have a horse that has skin problems each year and have had a major problem this year. This fly spray mixture worked extremely well for me, but I did stop using it because I was afraid the oil in the Skin-So-Soft might be bothering her.
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Craig Storey
Posted on Sunday, Aug 22, 1999 - 8:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am about to start formulating supplements for horses for a business that provides nutrition products. As there are so many supplements on the market, does anyone have any new ideas for supplements that they themselves would want to be available, i.e. a mineral supplement to help prevent set-fast (azoturia)??
Any suggestions would be gratefully received. My email address is craigstorey@hotmail.com.
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Linda Shaw
Posted on Monday, Aug 23, 1999 - 3:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

An easy way to clean grime off bits (even if it is as hard as cement) is to first rinse the bit with hot water, then use toothpaste and an old toothbrush. It comes off SO easy in no time- then just rinse it off. The bit looks like new and you don't have to worry about using chemical cleaners that would leave a bad taste. It is also cheaper!
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Linda Shaw
Posted on Monday, Aug 23, 1999 - 3:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

An easy way to clean grime off bits (even if it is as hard as cement) is to first rinse the bit with hot water, then use toothpaste and an old toothbrush. It comes off SO easy in no time- then just rinse it off. The bit looks like new and you don't have to worry about using chemical cleaners that would leave a bad taste. It is also cheaper!
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Linda Shaw
Posted on Monday, Aug 23, 1999 - 3:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

An easy way to clean grime off bits (even if it is as hard as cement) is to first rinse the bit with hot water, then use toothpaste and an old toothbrush. It comes off SO easy in no time- then just rinse it off. The bit looks like new and you don't have to worry about using chemical cleaners that would leave a bad taste. It is also cheaper!
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Helen Weedon
Posted on Thursday, Aug 26, 1999 - 4:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I taught my mare to accept me catching her urine in a bucket and ultimately urinating on command - obviously you can't make them do it if they don't want to have one anyway but by studying them you'll soon find out when they have the urge. Mine needs her bucket after she has had her hard feed, after a longish ride and when she comes in from the field - she is very shy about doing it anywhere outside of her stable and will cross her legs for hours! I use an old supplement tub with a handle ( small and light enough to hold easily behind her) and show it to her asking her ' do you want to wee?', then I command her 'do me a wee' repeated as necessary to encourage her. She soon learned that a contribution to the bucket got her lots of praise and her haynet and now she gets ready as soon as she sees me in the mornings. Now I can be sure she is comfortable before we go out to a show or on a long ride, I can monitor her health, I save on mucking out time and bedding and she has a much nicer stable environment. The down side is that everyone laughs at us, but they are still pretty impressed and I can threaten to throw the bucket contents at them! Perhaps I'm lucky as my mare is intelligent and quick to learn (about 4 days to recognise and act on the command) and now when she is outside her stable and I'm around she lets me know that she needs to go inside - dumb animals ideed!!
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Darren Robertson
Posted on Thursday, Aug 26, 1999 - 6:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

If only they could talk :-)

You didn't explain what the horse does when you are not around.

Other than that I say "Well done" for working with your horse, most horses are that intelligent, it is just that most owners don't work with it.
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Helen Weedon
Posted on Friday, Aug 27, 1999 - 4:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Darren - don't worry, my horse widdles to her hearts content in my absence and thinks she is on a productivity bonus where droppings are concerned. She knows she is being good and pleasing me when I'm around that's all.
You are right though, most people don't take the time to study their horses and its a real shame, both parties could benefit so much.
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Grace E. Larson
Posted on Sunday, Aug 29, 1999 - 10:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

A suggestion for easier Sheath Cleaning : We use Vet Lube because it is cheaper than KY Jelly . We apply the vet lube to all areas of the horse's sheath and penis . Let this soak in for 5 minutes then using a terry cloth rag wash the area with warm water . The smegma comes right off . We rinse the sheath and penis with warm water from the hose or a bucket .This is non-irritating unlike some of the sheath cleaners and we think it works better .
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Teresa A
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 31, 1999 - 12:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tips for Boarding your horse

If you're not lucky enough to own a place to keep your horse here are some lessons I've learned (mostly the hard way :) ).
1. Have a list (preferably written) as to what is essential for you/your horse and what would be "really nice". NO place is likely to meet every need but you need to be clear on what is important for you. Be upfront with your needs to the owner/manager so that they will know if they are able to comply.

2. Visit the prospective place at least on three occassions. The first time call and make an appointment, after that "drop in" to look around, preferably at different times of day. This will allow you to view the facilities. Things to look for are:
-are the pastures/paddocks safe(fencing secure, not too many horses together for the size, no big rocks laying around, no poisonous plants, look for ANY hazard in the pasture.
-talk to people who board there and maybe others who have left (if you can find them).

3. Find out the feeding schedule, type of feed and check the hay for dust, quality, etc.

4. Be clear on how much the board is and what else is required (deworming, vaccinations).

5. Are you allowed to use your vet/farrier or are there restrictions?

6. Are you allowed to bring in others to coach you and if so, do you need to "rent" the space for that time?

7. If they train/give lessons find out if it will interfere with when you want to ride. A well-run place will have a set schedule that you can work around. If there is not a set schedule you could find your ride cut short because of it.

8. Is there a secure place for your tack and equipment?

9. Do you have access to a bathroom? (yes, this has come up)

10. Have a written contract specifying your rights and responsibilities as well as the owner/manager. Make sure it specifies areas you have access to. Believe it or not, I was actually locked away from my tack because "it's our place and we can limit you anywere/how we please". Legally they can't but it's best to avoid this.

11. Be clear on how much notice needs to be given on both sides and make sure it's in the contract that your horse will continue to recieve the same care during that notice period.

12. Be clear that this is a contract between two individuals and that both you and the owner/manager are responsible for treating each other with mutual respect.
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Bruce C. Kramer
Posted on Friday, Sep 3, 1999 - 8:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My horse lost about a 12 inch circle of hair on both shoulders this summer due to sunburn/scabbing. (Her shoulders are white). Does anyone have a suggestion/product that is useful in helping the hair to grow back?

Thanks!

Rhonda
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Admin
Posted on Sunday, Sep 5, 1999 - 10:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Rhonda,
This area is for posting helpful hints and not for asking questions. Post this message in the Diseases: Skin: Forum,
Thanks, Administration
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Helen Weedon
Posted on Monday, Sep 13, 1999 - 7:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Do you use haynets to feed your horse? If so, do you find they fall apart easily and cut your hands up when you tie them up? Here's two ideas which will help.
1. Make your own nets out of baling twine. You can custom make for different sized horses/ponies and make the hole sizes to suit your exact needs. When you open a new bale of hay cut the twine right beside the knots and keep it somewhere safe until you are ready to make a net. You'll need 26 strands for a small net and say 34 for a big one. Tie them all together at the knot end and hook up onto something well off the ground(ie. head height). Take one strand and knot it to the one immediately to its right by winding the two around your finger. Keep moving and tying to the right.When all the strands are paired move down, say 3 inches for a small holed net, more for bigger ones, and repeat the knotting, tying the right strand of one pair to the left of the next pair on the right.Keep the rows of knots level. Keep moving down until you are a few inches from the end of the strands. Make a small loop at the end of each strand and cut of the spare end. Seal each end by melting it in a flame (be careful here, the molten twine is and stays very hot for a while) and allow to cool and harden. Unhook your net, cut off the original bale knots in one slice and melt the ends off into a big lump. Take three spare strands of twine and plait into a rope. Thread it through the little loops at the mouth of the net, knot together the ends and seal with a flame again. Your net will look tiny and like a sock, just stretch it a bit over a cushion and its ready to be filled with hay. These homemade nets are free so it doesn't matter if you lose them, they last much longer and the tying up rope is easier on your hands when the net is really heavy. Also the smaller holes make it easy to restrict the intake of hay and harder for the horse to get its foot caught up.
2. This is even easier. Broken your lead rope? Don't throw away the spring clip. Use it to safely tie up your haynet to a ring. Hang the net as usual then open the hook , attach the tying up string and clip the hook direct to the ring - easier on your hands again, the net won't get pulled down and there's no knot to pull so tight you can't undo it again. If your horse does get hung up in the net its then quicker to release him.
Helen
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Elizabeth Anderson
Posted on Thursday, Sep 16, 1999 - 7:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Two good ideas for marking your pastured horses during storms/hurricanes.
Order dog name tags from your local hardware or feed store with your name, address and phone no. Braid them into your horses mane with orange or yellow baleing twine through the hole.
Buy a can of bright florescent paint and spray paint or brush on, your phone number across your horse's rump. This one is probably more effective, but if you show, it takes a while to grow out.
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