Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Prevent casting in stall

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Wright
New Member
Username: Remmi

Post Number: 3
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Sunday, Jan 1, 2006 - 5:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Any ideas on how to prevent casting in a stall? Both my horses have been cast during the night and were discovered by the night checker. Our stalls are 12' X 12', rubber mats, wood shavings for bedding. They get turned out during the day. Thanks!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 14408
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Jan 1, 2006 - 6:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Most commonly horses roll up against a wall trapping their legs between their bodies and the wall creating a situation where they cannot extend their front legs and roll sternal to get up. But you also see horses trapped in a depression or laying downhill back against a wall with their legs extended uphill that cannot roll up. Which is your case?
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1028
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Sunday, Jan 1, 2006 - 7:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've seen barns where they have a board about 4 to 6 inches off the floor all around the stall walls. This is supposed to give the horse traction, but I don't know if it actually works or not. Some people put anti roll devices around their horses, too. They are a surcingle that is built up over the horse's back and prevents the horse from rolling all the way over.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: Corinne

Post Number: 199
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Monday, Jan 2, 2006 - 10:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

A tip from my instructor that she provided to our barn manager...She said where she is from in England the standard bedding is banked on the sides...she prefers a deep bed of straw....if you are using shavings you can do the same just put more on the sides in a slope so the horse has something to push off. She said she never seen a horse cast when his bedding was banked and was suprised we didn't do that here....
Couldn't hurt to give it a try.

v/r
Corinne
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aileen
Member
Username: Sunny66

Post Number: 1034
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Monday, Jan 2, 2006 - 11:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I do as Corinne states, bank high on the sides, my horse uses it as a couch :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Wright
New Member
Username: Remmi

Post Number: 4
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Monday, Jan 2, 2006 - 9:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O,

I believe they got their legs caught between their body and the wall. Would banking help that type of casting? If so, how high would you have to bank to be effective? We use wood shavings.

Heidi
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: Corinne

Post Number: 200
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Monday, Jan 2, 2006 - 11:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Heidi,
Just by my experience, If you are using shavings you have to bank them pretty high to be affective and if you are buying by the cubic foot it might not be cheap to bank them.
I presume if want some sort of quantification you can imagine them going to lie down then rolling to the side trying to extend their legs to the wall, the shavings would have to be high enough in a bank that when they roll or try to extend to the side they don't have a chance to extend or hit the floor because of the bank is there...
I have a small arabian so the barn owners use 1 to 1 1/2 foot bank in his stall with less shavings in the middle. She uses some pelleted bedding mixed in with bagged shavings to add more bulk because they are nice and fluffy when they expand. The bigger horses take more of a bank.

Good luck.

v/r
Corinne
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lee
Member
Username: Paul303

Post Number: 555
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Monday, Jan 2, 2006 - 11:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

We used to fasten a strip of rubber matting around the stall. With our new set-up, the stalls open to an indoor paddock, and, on the outside wall, to an outdoor paddock, so they are locked in only when they eat. We also found, with stall kickers, lining the stall walls with rubber mats kind of "took the wind out of their sails".
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 14418
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 3, 2006 - 8:04 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Prevent(?) maybe not, but it certainly makes it much harder for them to get stuck by rolling onto the wall. The barns that I see that do this bank them up about 2 or 3 feet.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

cp
Member
Username: Cpacer

Post Number: 92
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 3, 2006 - 1:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wow, I had no idea that is why the shavings are pushed up against the wall. I'm always going in with a fork and evening them back out thinking the cushioning should be in the middle where he lays. I won't anymore...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellie Leo
Member
Username: Skye

Post Number: 118
Registered: 5-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 3, 2006 - 2:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Perhaps Sara is referring to the strips mentioned at this web site? I've heard people have had success with them:


http://www.horseguardfence.com/pages2k/cat58.html

I imagine there are other sources to check out, too.

Good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Wright
New Member
Username: Remmi

Post Number: 5
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 3, 2006 - 8:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Now I am beginning to understand why so many people sent messages of thanks to Horse Advisor at the end of this year. This is great! I really appreciate everyone's input and will start banking my stalls higher and will also look into the horse guard fence web site that Ellie passed along. Thanks to all for your suggestions!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1030
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 3, 2006 - 10:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

No, I was just referring to wooden boards attached to the walls about 6" or so off the floor. The boards, and I assume the rubber strips too, just give the horse some purchase so it can roll back over and get up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

WTG
Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 138
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Thursday, Jan 5, 2006 - 8:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Heidi,

I agree with Dr.O on the bedding. I am with Aileen and Corinne, I would start banking.

We bank our bedding up 5 feet with 3 feet of ground in the 12x12's. The bedding falls over the railings it is so high. No casts in 5 years.

The horses love it. They use it like a big soft bed with pillows they make for themselves.

After a hard days work and a bath(when horse is dry)the horses roll around like children when they get back to their stall. Even the old schoolers who lesson a couple times a day.

The way I think of my horse sleeping is the same way I think of myself sleeping. My horse lives in a 24x48 open pipe corral in beautiful California.

The ground consists of the sand already present, 8 bags dry stall, 35 inches of pine wood chips(which get stomped down), and 10 bags of shavings on top of the wood chips.

After almost 14-16 inches of rain the two outside 1/4 covered stalls I have at our ranch are the only two outside dry stalls on the entire 95 acre property of which houses 135 horses.

Most all of the other stalls are under water. It will take awhile for them to dry out. Meanwhile sucking off shoes of many of the horses has been a problem.

When one can set up a horses living quarters properly the first time in most cases we can beat the odds. Meaning escape injury or prevent headache.

I find that every year I have to put another layer of wood chips as the rain washes them away.
So far so good.

I hope the same for you and your horse. Good Luck.

Sincerely,

WTG
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Imogen Bertin
Member
Username: Imogen

Post Number: 735
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Sunday, Jan 8, 2006 - 7:11 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Most people here in Ireland who use straw (except in very posh or racing yards with lots of available labour) leave the banks to settle semi-deep litter, we don't muck them out except when "spring cleaning" the stable.

Occasionally you have to remove a damp section but straw banks work best if they are basically semi solid straw and manure (which dries out and isn't smelly/nasty) down below with some fresh straw on top. It provides more of a curve/cushion to prevent casting.

The only time I ever had a horse cast using this system was a large halfbred mare who went for a massive roll just after a day's hunting in a smallish stable. Fortunately I heard her hooves scrabbling on the wall because the stables are close to the house and was able to rope one of her back legs and pull her around.

All the best

Imogen
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sue G
Member
Username: Warwick

Post Number: 249
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Sunday, Jan 8, 2006 - 6:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Imogen

I remember from my childhood living in the UK seeing horse stalls banked with straw but can't remember folks doing a major mucking in the spring time. I now know it's common practice in Europe and since I just took riding lessons as a kid, I likely just didn't witness this personally. So my question is how do you handle the large amount of bedding that comes out of the stalls during spring cleaning? It must be a major amount of material especially in large barns. I'm curious as here in the Vancouver area of Canada we have a dreadful time getting rid of even small manure piles (which tend to be wood shavings or sawdust based). I can't imagine having a giant pile of straw bedding removed but maybe there are uses for it that we haven't explored here?

Also, how are you faring health-wise? (So many of us on the HA were privy to your nasty health scare about a year ago.)

Cheers
Sue
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

WTG
Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 142
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 - 4:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Heidi,

The area where the horse lays down can be a good 3 feet deep in the middle and five feet high on the sides. The horses end up packing the shavings down with their weight any way.

Some horses will pull some shavings down from one of the sides and make a cushy bed for them selves. It is a very safe way to bed horses.

It is easier for the guys to clean. As most the horses learn they only want to poop and pee in one place and not on their own bed.

Additionally because of the banking theory all shavings will go back up onto the bank and the excrement is discarded therefore cleaning is more efficient.

We have found if one has to stall a horse, banking is the one of the best ways to insure all involved have safety as a first priority. Peace of mind for the rider and total comfort for the horse.

God Bless all the animals and all the people who care for them!

WTG
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Carol DeAngelis
Member
Username: Cometcar

Post Number: 11
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Saturday, Feb 4, 2006 - 6:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My horse is a chronic caster. He broke his hip two years ago from being cast and I now use an anti-cast roller AND the anti-cast strips sold by HorseGuard. (Kind of like a belt and suspenders.) No one else in the other 32 stalls seems to have a problem with getting cast when they roll. Go figure.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Liliana Velasco Ariza
Member
Username: Liliana5

Post Number: 17
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Friday, Feb 10, 2006 - 12:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just wondered could the horses be a bit too big for the stable? in England we did bank higher on the sides and also for the big 17 handers we used bigger boxes.

Just a thought...
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC