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Discussion on Peppermint for horses

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Stephany Coate
Posted on Friday, May 5, 2000 - 9:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

DrO and everyone,
Ok, this may be a better place to post this question...
Does anyone know if there are any risks involved in giving a colt an occassional peppermint candy as a treat? He's 14 mos. old and very healthy, no eating problems of any kind. I gave him 2 last night and he liked them, but I was told it isn't a good idea to give them any at all. I was just curious, I've heard of people using the peppermints for treats and have never heard of any problems with it. He also gets carrots once in awhile. He doens't like apples so he doesn't get those. Any other ideas for treats that aren't bad for them? Thanks alot.
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Emily French
Posted on Friday, May 5, 2000 - 11:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've given my horses lots of things, some they
liked otheres not. Accross the board they love
pepermint candies. They might get one once or
twice a year but I've never heard of any reason
not to give them for a rare treat. You can allso
try Buckeye Pepermint Treats for Horses, they are
nurtrious and are very strong pepermint. My horses
love them! Also, don't throw out your watermellon
rind... oooo horsey heaven!
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Friday, May 5, 2000 - 11:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Emily-
Thanks for the reply. :0)
Watermelon rinds,huh? Wow...do you have to do anything with them first? Boil, or something like that?
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claire sidebottom
Posted on Friday, May 5, 2000 - 2:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I give, and have always given, peppermints as horse treats on a regular basis. When my yearling was 6 months old he had a bad leg injury and had to have antibiotics. To get these down him we mixed a whole packet of chopped up polos in his feed. The vet said that it was fine and the biggest risk was that if we did it for years his teeth would rot!!
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Friday, May 5, 2000 - 3:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Claire-
Thanks alot for the info. I don't plan on letting his teeth rot. haha Apparently, someone local had a horse that was ran to the vet for giving peppermint. I have no idea how much was given or what any other circumstances were so I just wanted to ask-just in case. :0) My colt seems to like them alot, he even sucks on them a bit before chewing them up. *grin*
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Emily French
Posted on Saturday, May 6, 2000 - 2:11 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

As for the watermellon rinds you need to do
nothing to them. sometimes you need to break them
into small pieces at first till they know what
they are, but after that WATCH OUT! my horses will
knock you down to get them!

All so another treat,... leftover cooked
spagettie. Verry funny to see a horse slurp up
long noodles!*grin*
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Saturday, May 6, 2000 - 9:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Emily-
Thank goodness, I finally have a use for that leftover spaghetti. haha I always cook too much. I never would have guessed that one. I'll try them and see if he likes it. Thanks alot!
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Angela S.
Posted on Saturday, May 6, 2000 - 12:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, my horse LOVES peppermints!!! After Xmas I buy candy canes at half price and give them to the horses.
As far as I know, peppermints are not bad for horses. My mare also likes gummy bears and licorice, (red).
They will literally *kill* for watermelon rinds!!
She also eats whole oranges and lemons, skin and all, yum! (I figure a few a week will keep her Vit.C levels up, as horses do not store Vit.C in their bodies.)
My friends horse prefers wintergreen mints, (Lifesavers, if you please). hahaha...:) though he won't turn down a peppermint if offered.
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Saturday, May 6, 2000 - 10:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Angela-
That's funny about the lifesavers, a girl at work has a horse who likes lifesavers and isn't particular as to flavor. haha
I'm definately going to try the watermelon rinds. That sounds like a good one. I didn't know that about Vit. C, either. I wonder how important is Vit. C to horses, anyone know?!
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Angela S.
Posted on Sunday, May 7, 2000 - 12:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Stephany, from what I understand, (and I may be wrong, so feel free to correct me) horses use Vit.C as an anti-oxidant to get rid of toxins in the body, horses don't store it in their bodies so what is not used passes thru.
Alfalfa hay, has some vit.C, alot of the new Liquid Flex products have what is called Ester-C in their ingredients, supposedly that is more readily absorbed by the horse.
I like feeding citrus to my horse as she enjoys oranges and lemons, and I have seen no harmful effects of feeding 3-4 oranges a week to her.
I think that horses don't need as much Vit C as humans, but it is a necessary vitamin for them.
IMO.
Equus had a great article a few months ago on Vitamins, wish I could remember the issue, it was most informative. I will see if I can dig it out, may have been one of lasts years issues, hmmm, the ole'brain just ain't what it used to be...arrrgh...
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claire sidebottom
Posted on Sunday, May 7, 2000 - 3:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Our cob mare loves jam doughnuts - she squelches them whole and the jam runs down her chin. She was very thin when we had her and we think children used to give her scraps as she eats virtually any human food. Her yearling son, who we have had since birth, is totally different. He only likes mix, not pelletts, he doesn't like any treats except peppermints and carrotts!!
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Monday, May 8, 2000 - 6:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Concerning vitamin C and horses: they do use vitamin C but they manufacture it themselves. There has been some research to indicate older horses may need some supplementation but this is controversial at this time.
DrO
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Monday, May 8, 2000 - 10:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Claire-
My colt also only likes peppermints and carrots, not apples. I'm going to try the watermelon rinds though next time I have a watermelon. I found some interesting recipes for horse cookies, horse muffins, etc. Anyone ever tried them? They sounded good enough, I may want to try them. haha
Ok, here's another silly question... Is there any harm in sharing a treat with your horses? I will often share carrots with mine and last year at a couple of shows, where the heat was blistering, I would share glasses of water with my mare. She drank from my cup after me, then I after her. Hey, it was REALLY hot. haha I know that sounds gross, but what can I say? I love my horses like I love my kid. *grin*
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Joe A. Dale
Posted on Monday, May 8, 2000 - 3:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Seedless grapes and peaches without the pit.
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Monday, May 8, 2000 - 3:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Joe-
Thanks again. It's good to know there's something else I can pack for the shows to share with the horses when it's hot. ;0)
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claire sidebottom
Posted on Monday, May 8, 2000 - 4:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My daughter shares everything with the horses - like ice creams - one lick each etc - yuk!!

Stephany - just curious - where did you see recipes for horse cakes and stuff?
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Teresa Alexander-Arab
Posted on Monday, May 8, 2000 - 5:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

FYI Here's a recipe that my horse will stand on his head for :)

1 C. rolled oats
1 C. each grated carrot and apple
1/2 C. molasses
1/2 C. flour
2 tbsp oil
1 tsp salt.

Mix all together. Press onto a greased cookie sheet and bake at 350 for approx. 30 min (until golden brown). Cut up and store in a plastic bag. They keep for about 2 weeks and are loved by horses and dogs.

TeresaA
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Tuesday, May 9, 2000 - 10:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Claire-
Here's the web site for the recipes, I hope this works...
http://www.qtm.net/~mitchj/recipes.html

I that doesn't work, you can email me if you want and I'll send them to you.
justgottaride@hotmail.com

Teresa- Thanks for the recipe, I'll add that one to my list. Gosh, everyone says my horse is spoiled, I don't understand where they get that from. haha
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claire sidebottom
Posted on Tuesday, May 9, 2000 - 4:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Stephany and Teresa. The link worked and it has even got a birthday cake recipe so we can make a cake for our baby who will be one on Friday!! What timing!
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Cathleen Androulidakis
Posted on Monday, Jun 12, 2000 - 1:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a question about Peppermints. I have heard..you all know how that goes...that if you feed a horse peppermints that it will make his Drug Test positive. Have any of you ever heard of that? I heard it from a person I know that shows alot and she told me that people try to get away with having drugged horses by hanging a bag of peppermints outside his stall telling everyone within earshot that their horse just loves them. Then when the test comes up positive they scream, Peppermints! You all saw me feed him peppermints. Any truth to this Dr. O ? Or was she just trying to scare me? Thanks, Cathie A. =^..^=
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 13, 2000 - 10:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Even if true how does this help them, just because they have an excuse does not get them off the hook usually. I guess they could appeal but this frequently gets you no where.
DrO
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Natalie K Prentice
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 13, 2000 - 12:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Stephany - I'm new to the forum and was going to suggest grapes but someone's already done that. Seeded or seedless, doesn't matter. Sometimes the fact that they're round catches the horses off guard so try halving one or two so they get the taste of it before they have to deal with the shape. With all of the fruits I present to my gang, I make sure to wash it. No need to add pesticides to their diet! My gelding LOVES pears and fritos neither of which my mare will touch but she will eat oranges, strawberries and many of the commercially available horse cookies (i.e. Mrs. Pastures.) The philosophy at our barn is everything in moderation. Some of the many 'treats' which can be seen at our barn include marshmallows, cereal, and blueberry muffins. Happy treating!
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Cathleen Androulidakis
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 14, 2000 - 8:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr.O. I think this "helps" them cover for a drugged horse as long as he doesn't win too big. If they win too big then they want the drug testing. If they are able to go and have a fair turn out on a green horse without drug testing they may be able to sell the horse for more money at, or after the show. When they protest the positive it gives them an excuse to the prospective new owner about how stupid the tests are when a peppermint or two will make it positive. At least this is the way it was explained to me. I really would like to know if a horse does come up positive for peppermint in a drug test. Is there any way to find out? I would hate to be giving a good horse peppermints and find out later(after spending money to go to a show) that it came up positive over mints. Interesting...Thanks for your time, Cathie =^..^=
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Nancy E. Hodges
Posted on Thursday, Jun 15, 2000 - 12:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peppermints contain menthol, which strictly speaking is a drug. For such competitions as endurance racing, peppermints would be illegal. Peppermint should not be used externally either for endurance racing (linament). I can't imagine that peppermint would show up in drug testing though. Peppermint is also antiseptic and antispasmotic and relieves indigestion. Sniffing pepperment essential oils also helps me keep awake. It really IS a drug!
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Nancy Ziegler
Posted on Thursday, Jun 15, 2000 - 10:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Cherry Lifesavers are my mare's favorite treat. They are also easier to keep in your pocket than grapes! ;-)
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Jackie Aldrich
Posted on Friday, Jun 16, 2000 - 12:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello All,
Not to be a party pooper or anything but I hope everyone is going easy with all these treats. The main ingredient in all of them is sugar and we all know what sugar can do to our teeth, and we brush. Horses teeth are just as vulnerable as ours and it just worries me that too many people don't take that into consideration. I work at a Vet Clinic that does both small and large animal and believe me, we get chewed out for feeding the occasion carrot. Which I have to say I give to my dogs and my horses but only once in a while.
Equine Dental Specialist are very expensive and very hard to come by. An alternative might be to cut the feed ration and use the difference as their treat. It's a lot harder to carry around but a lot less sugar on the teeth.
Just a thought.....
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Imogen Bertin
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2000 - 12:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Jackie

What's wrong with carrots? I always use them for catching horses as most will pop over to investigate the first flash of an orange object.

I can understand the anti-sweet/teethrot logic and also the problem with horses that get nippy because of being fed too many titbits. But if your animals aren't nippy what's wrong with a carrot every couple of days?

Just interested... horses here will also kill for fodder beet (not the same as sugar beet - they look like massive carrot/turnip crosses and are grown for feeding to cattle) in the winter. They love to chew away at them.

Imogen
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A.F.M. Hyde-Clarke
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2000 - 1:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Agree with you, Imogen. My horses adore carrots, and never need or ask for sweets. They have never had sugar or peppermints, quite unnecessary. For a very special treat, they get a quartered apple, but not too many as my previous vet used to say that too many could cause colic.

I'm the one with the bad chocolate habit, and one in the family ruining her teeth is quite enough!
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Jackie Aldrich
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2000 - 3:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Imogen and Alexa,
It's the natural sugar in carrots that can cause the same effect as giving a piece of candy. We are constantly lectured on diet with our animals including treats. We tend to think our animals need treats like us. I'm not saying never to treat but to do it in moderation. It's kind of like kids "love and praise goes a long way". I don't mean to sound so neurotic, like I said, I too feed the occasional treat. Like any thing else, moderation is the key.
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2000 - 12:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Jackie-
I, too, take into consideration my horse's teeth. I'm the one who started this whole discussion and gosh, am I surprised at the response. :0) My colt loves peppermints, but I don't give them to him much. One every now and then, that's it. He also likes carrots, apples, and ice cubes. I wonder if it's the crunching he likes, I don't know. haha Anyway, he isn't nippy or in any way demanding on receiving treats. He knows I give them and will sometimes look for them, but that's it. He knows what they are, and practically begs for them if he thinks I have one. haha He behaves though, he has been taught to stand in a certain place and he waits there for me until I give whatever I have to him. I never hand feed, always in the bucket. That helps with the nippiness. My point is, I don't see any harm in it as long as it isn't overdone. I have seen people go a little crazy with the treats and the horses get a little hard to deal with as a result. I've tried to teach my baby his manners. He's still a baby so he's still learning, but he does real well. I agree, though, you have to watch yourself. They are so easy to spoil. :0)
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SK
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 27, 2000 - 12:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm also a carrot person, but my horse also gets apples in the fall. However I believe my mare would eat almost anything. I did try cereal once though when I was desparate for a treat. Hey since Oats is the main component of cheerios I thought she'd like them. Apparently not.

Yes, she loves peppermint but I keep these for the occassional treat when she's been REALLY good.

Actually I was applying the same principal with the carrots as they tell us in human nutrition (stuff you learned in school or from your mom, but hey it keeps changing). That the fiber would actually brush the teeth and excercise the gums. Hmm, I guess hay probably does a much better job.
Also, I can understand the comment about sugar content, but what about the molasses in sweet feed? Does anyone know if there are any correlations with this and dental problems?
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Jackie Aldrich
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 27, 2000 - 1:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Skeller,
Your not going to get people to stop feeding the sweet feed but you can break it down into smaller feedings to be used as a treat.{you know how they come running for that!}I think with the molasses in their diet, we shouldn't be adding more. And they say smaller frequent feedings throughout the day is better for them anyway.
Happy Trails!
Jackie
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Monday, Jul 24, 2000 - 11:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi everybody-
I just wanted to tell you all that I discovered a new treat for my horses and they go wild over it...popsicles. Has anyone tried these?
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Tammy Taylor
Posted on Monday, Jul 24, 2000 - 4:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes,

My horse has had a popsicle & I believe he enjoyed it a lot. Another treat that my horse will pick my pockets if he knows they are there are Starburst Fruit Chews. I had them in my pocket for me, but he caught wind of them & wouldn't do anything I asked of him until I handed one over. They probably aren't good for his teeth, so he only gets one every once in a while.

He spit out the peppermints.
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 25, 2000 - 3:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tammy-
You gotta love these guys, they always have a way of making you laugh, ya know? Rio (my colt) is waiting by his feeder with his whole face lit up if he so much as hears the wrapper from a peppermint or sees me opening a popsicle. Funny.
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Gay M. Walker
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 25, 2000 - 8:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

We had a horse that went gaga over Oreo Cookies. If he caught you eating them (and they sold them in the barn office), it was "one for him, and one for me" if you were lucky--otherwise it was "two for him, and one for me." I got to be very secretive with my cookie habit, but did make a point of buying them to reward him with at shows because he was always such a good boy.

We also have a pony who is nuts over jelly donuts. One time, she escaped from her stall. The trainer searched everywhere to no avail, and then went up the steps into her temporary office trailer to make some phone calls re the missing pony. In it, she found Miss Annie delicately cleaning up the leftover jelly donuts from that morning's staff meeting...The pony had actually climbed the stairs and gone inside!
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Stephany Coate
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2000 - 9:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Gay-
That is so amazing about your pony, what a character. :0)
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Dawn Adams
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2000 - 10:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My Paint LOVES root beer! can't go to the barn with a glass or he will do all he can to get it away from you. He will actually take a large plastic cup, hold it between his lip and teeth and turn it up! Course he spills a lot, but he gets a good bit of it too! His former owners bottle raised him and I'm pretty sure they had to have let him drink out of their cups for him to be so good at it!
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ruth sanderson (Thor)
Posted on Sunday, Mar 11, 2001 - 5:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

One of my horses has no interest in most treats. He ignores apples,bread,various types of hard candy, and jellybeans. He will occasionally accept a piece of peppermint stick, and will take carrots some of the time, but I have yet to find a treat that he really likes. There must be something. I hope so, because I want some way other than praise to reward him. My other horse will eat ANYTHING. On his birthday he always gets Twinkies and potato chips, and some Iced tea,(he likes Snapple best) which he would slurp by the gallon if we let him!(Good thing his birthday is only once a year)
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Dominique May-Guy
Member
Username: Dommay

Post Number: 2
Registered: 3-2003
Posted on Friday, Mar 14, 2003 - 1:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi there,
new to this forum and reading this post helped me remember my first Quarter Horse gelding that loved pepeomint life savers. I would give to him before taking his bridle off and of course the next day, no probs moving away from getting bridled. sucked it right up because the flavor of lifesavers was on the bit. He also loved the soda and egg salad sandwiches.

I have a question for the Doc and anyone who can provide some information for me on a hypp n/h gelding I just brought home to get out of a terrible area/care.

Question is what type of treats can I give him that will not give too much Potassium? Hypp horses need to be on a very low Potassium diet. Not sure how this baby was raised other than halter showing but he will not take a treat from me hand other than feed!
Thanks!
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