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Discussion on Fall 2000

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Linda Christian (Savage)
Posted on Sunday, Oct 1, 2000 - 4:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My Appaloosa has Anterior Uvitis, but he has not had a flare up in over a year now, and one of the things I did to help him at that time was to put a patch on his fly mask to keep the eye protected from the sunlight. I cut a piece of felt, about 5x5 or so and glued it on the inside of the fly mask, I used sticky glue which you can get at any craft store, it works great! and it's cheap! and when you're done with it you just take it out and wash the fly mask. He now has a small ulcer and the patch is doing it's job again, and he feels much better. :)
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Nancy Herbert (Gemtwist)
Posted on Thursday, Oct 5, 2000 - 11:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My husband saw this on another board, but I thought it was such a great idea I'd pass it along. When we first got our orphan filly at 10 days old, many people suggested feeding her chopped hay, but we couldn't find it anywhere. The idea my husband found was to run hay through our garden shredder (you know the thing you put the small branches, hedge trimmings, etc. through that chops them up into mulch). It does a wonderful job making chopped hay. In the US, you can usually pick up a small shredder for about $100. Just be sure to feed the hay through slowly. Also, the shredder needs to have a bag attachment ... unless you have a very brave soul with a big catcher's mitt :).

Nancy
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Brenda Artman (Heavenly)
Posted on Thursday, Nov 2, 2000 - 10:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Healthy, long , and luxurious tails are achieved through proper nutrition and lots of TLC and consistency. I will share the method that I personally use to grow and maintain a long tail on all my horses. I use Infusium 23 shampoo and conditioner on the tail. I often spray the tail with Healthy Hair conditioner. By keeping the tail braided, balled, vet wrapped, and bagged up , you will prevent breakage and drying. Remember to take the tail down at least once a month to brush out, wash, condition, and rebraid. With this method I have been able to add up to 3 feet of new growth to my tails.
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Julie Markich (Julieann)
Posted on Thursday, Nov 2, 2000 - 6:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Infusium 23 is the best shampoo & Conditioner i have ever used myself and yes i agree that it works great on horses as is removes the buildup of oils mixed with dirt very well.

Protecting the tail is the best way to get a fuller tail. Why? because every time a horse swishes it's tail hair breaks causing it to become odd lengths and not as full.
Very good point Brenda.
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Jim and Kristi (Hunter1)
Posted on Saturday, Nov 18, 2000 - 2:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Heres a tip for anyone that shows or travels a lot with their horses. We were told about it by some people in our area that spend more time at shows than they do at home.

If you have a horse that is particular about its water such as when you move from place to place and the water has a different taste or smell, you can add a little of the powdered Gatorade to it. Not enough that your actually mixing full strength, but enough to give the horse the taste and smell as the place before. The people we know have actually gone as far as to figure out which horse likes which flavor the best. They also believe that the Gatorade also helps them to recover from a hard ride or show.

DrO, would you see any truth in the last point?
Thanks, Kristi


If you use it to lightly flavor the water, I suspect there will not be enough electrolytes to make much difference~DrO
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Jordana Meisner (Presario)
Posted on Tuesday, Nov 21, 2000 - 9:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Here's a super time and back saver for packing and wrapping an abcessed foot. Put a piece of cardboard under the horse's foot so that he can make an imprint in it. Cut out that imprint. While your water is heating, lay out long strips of duct tape, sticky side up. I use 4 overlapping vertical strips, 3 overlapping horizontal strips, and an X in the middle. Put the piece of cut out cardboard on top of that and smooth down, making sure the tape is sticking nicely. Put a slathering of icthammol (or whatever you're using) on top of the cardboard. Once you've soaked and dried the foot, put the cardboard on the foot, icthammol-side against the sole, and press down the tape that is now overhanging the foot. Put the foot down, and wrap a couple of supporting pieces of duct tape around the foot, and voila! A packing that has been known to last for a couple of days on soft ground.

Not as strong as our bandage in Equine Diseases: First Aid: Hoof Diseases and First Aid in Horses but yours is much easier and has great instructions~DrO.
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Zoe English (Nonie)
Posted on Tuesday, Nov 21, 2000 - 10:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Boy do you sound like an expert, Jordana. GRIN.
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Linda Chapman (Lchapman)
Posted on Wednesday, Nov 22, 2000 - 3:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm not sure if this has been mentioned before but I thought I would put my 2 cents in for others that are not aware of it.
A couple of months ago I had plans to go to a show that was a couple of weeks out and I noticed several bite marks, caused from another horse across the fence, on my horse that I had planned on showing. I had heard that vitamin E applied to the hairless areas would help the growth of new hair very rapidly. I couldn't find any of the oil so I got the capsules and with a matter of a couple of weeks, all the hair had grown back.
Being an old timer in the horse business, we use to apply bacon grease. Is there any other old timers out there that would agree?
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Sally Payette (1sally)
Posted on Wednesday, Nov 22, 2000 - 8:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I remember the bacon grease, Linda. Everyone used it, including me, but really don't know if it did any good. Vit. E is another story though. Some surgeons recommend vitamin E to reduce scarring. So, I assume it does work.
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Elizabeth Ann Walker (Event)
Posted on Tuesday, Nov 28, 2000 - 5:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have used the bacon grease. It works great for growing the hair back but the major bummer is that it attracts the flys! Vitamin E doesn't attract the flys and works even better.
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Emily French (Jcsmoon)
Posted on Wednesday, Nov 29, 2000 - 4:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

How to beat the winter riding blues – Helpful Hints:

1) Take you winter riding gloves and sticking them on your calmest horses ears, then make funny noises to cause their ears to flip back and forth.
Caution DO NOT do this during hunting season, they look amazing like a 5-point buck!

2) Do #1 on the less than tolerant horses, it has an equally amusing effect. Make a game of who can launch the gloves the farthest when they shake their head.

3) Put on you husbands winter cover-alls and attempt to jump up on your horse bareback… for that matter, try to get up period without the aid of an overhead crane!

4) Challenge your barn mates to an Ice Ball Removing contest, awards given for the Fastest Removal, Largest Ice Ball, and Bloodiest Knuckles.

5) Ice Skate on the frozen stock tank … go ahead; you might as well because you know darn well it is going to be spring thaw before you break through that ice.

6) SMILE and keep things in perspective, remember when winter ends then you always have haying season to look forward to.

7) In a fit of desperation, string out 600 feet of extension cord and attempt to thaw your frozen arena with your hair dryer. It won’t work but what the heck, you got nothing better to do.

8) Clip your initials in your horse’s rear end. It can’t possibly look any more ridiculous than what your teenage son shaved in the back of his head.

9) Sit in the barn and think of as many oxy-moron horse related terms as you can: i.e. “easy keeper” is there anything really easy about keeping horses, “horse safe fencing” I dare you to show me a fence my filly can’t injure herself on, “safety stirrup” there is NO safe stirrup to fall from.

10) Try to convince your spouse that Rogaine for your balding Appaloosa IS a necessary medical expense.


Have a great holiday season :0)
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ANN COLLIER (Dres)
Posted on Thursday, Dec 7, 2000 - 6:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

A TURKEY BASTER...yes that is what i have been using all this month on cleaning my young horse's abscess... i found that to be much more user friendly then trying to push up the end of the syringe with one hand and, i can get more fluid in the baster then i can the syringe..!~ another point that helps is that if your horse won't let you get to close to the wound, well the baster is longer and with your arm attached even longer still.. :)
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Kim Fotter (Fpony)
Posted on Thursday, Dec 7, 2000 - 8:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Now that the weather is soo very cold and the air dry, static electricity makes brushing my Arab's coat impossible. I'm just glad I don't have to blanket him as the static from some blankets must be torture.

This is what I tried and it worked! I spray my brush with static guard for clothes. I also spray my pants and jacket to keep the charge down while grooming. The first grooming, with it, needed repeated spraying-I even spray my curry! Hey, I bet spraying the car seat would help with those shocks you get when shutting the door!

Have a happy holiday!
Kim
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Jordana Meisner (Presario)
Posted on Friday, Dec 8, 2000 - 11:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kim - I found that a cheap generic equivalent to J&J No More Tangles does an excellent job at keeping the shocks away. If I'm having that problem, I spray a mist all over horsey, and through his tail, and it's gone. Hmmm, however, now that I think about it, I haven't had a problem with static in his coat since I added oil to his diet. Hmmmmm...
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Angela Spucces (Rubysmom)
Posted on Friday, Dec 15, 2000 - 2:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I learned this one grooming for my instructor at a horse show last weekend.
If you have a gray horse, keep a spray bottle of alcohol handy. Of course gray horses seem to "attract" green manure spots, even with a sheet or blanket on!
Take a rub rag, spritz a bit of alcohol on the green spot and rub, Voila! Green spot is gone!!!
This beats rubbing and sponging out spots any day.
Another benefit, it is very inexpensive to use.
Also works on white socks, blazes, etc...for spots on the face, spritz the alcohol on the rag first, then rub.
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debbie borden (Debbicoo)
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 2, 2001 - 11:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I guess this is more of a human care tip. I've always had a problem with getting a sport bra with adequate support. After having surgery on both breasts Dec. 15 I was anxious to try riding again. The doc said it would be ok if I could get enough support to keep the bounce out. I thought of trying the ace bandage from the hospital but ended up putting on two bras. One on top of another. I was really surprised with the difference! I was really happy to find something that works so well.
Has anyone had a particular brand of bra that they especially liked?
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Imogen Bertin (Imogen)
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 3, 2001 - 3:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

(For European users...) Marks and Spencers sports bras are great especially now they started doing the black ones again. I must be getting old(er) because I hate the new ones that don't clip up that you have to struggle over your head and shoulders instead. If they have enough elastic for support then they are a nightmare to get on.

Imogen
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Linda norton (Norto)
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 3, 2001 - 7:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Champion Jogbra made for hi impact sports works for me. The cheapest place to get them is RoadRunner Sports (www.roadrunnersports.com)
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claire sidebottom (Claire)
Posted on Thursday, Jan 4, 2001 - 3:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have found that the bra's that look like short vests and have no cups as such, just an elasticated band all around under the bust are a million times better than the normal sort with straps. you pull them on, they dont undo and they have a t shaped back. sloggi do a good one that fits over my ample bust!!
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Cheryl Anderson (Canderso)
Posted on Friday, Jan 5, 2001 - 7:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O, No comments on bras from you???? ;-)
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Helen Weedon (Cara)
Posted on Friday, Jan 5, 2001 - 8:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Claire - great minds obviously think alike! I always use crop tops when I'm at shows. Like you I find them more comfortable and efficient - I think its because they push the bust down and the body then supports it, rather than pulling it up into thin air :) Thankfully I was at the end of the queue when boobs were being handed out and so I didn't get a huge amount!
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Friday, Jan 5, 2001 - 10:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

No but I do have some athletic support recommendations: don't skimp on the quality if you are going to ride young horses.
DrO
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Emily French (Jcsmoon)
Posted on Friday, Jan 5, 2001 - 11:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sport bras are also great places to pack treats when you have no pockets in your breeches (yes I am talking about carrot niblits stuffed in your cleavage). Though I must say it is a bit embarassing when your horse learns where the treats are coming from and requests a treat in public by flipping your boob! LOL - Oh, point of note, dont pack anything that crumbles when wet... after a good hard lesson you could find yourself a pound of molassas treat oatmeal in your bra.... Eewwwww!

Cheers!
Emily
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claire sidebottom (Claire)
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 10, 2001 - 1:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

don't you allways find a load of hay 'stored' down there too!!
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