Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Foal color

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lea-Anne Lesch
Member
Username: Mientjie

Post Number: 34
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Friday, Aug 11, 2006 - 2:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I just curious. What color might a foal be if the mare is bay(or bay dun) and the stallion is flea bitten gray?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 886
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Friday, Aug 11, 2006 - 2:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

50% chance of being gray.. unless the stallion is homozygous gray.. then GRAY for sure..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lori
Member
Username: Maggienm

Post Number: 194
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Friday, Aug 11, 2006 - 4:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lea-Anne, there are several possibilities.
If the mare is Homozygous for bay and the stallion is also H for bay(remember gray is a colour that goes 'overtop' the base colour)then the foal will be bay. and as Ann said %50 chance of gray.
If the mare carries bay and chestnut genes, and the stallion carries a chestnut gene you could get a bay or a chestnut which may turn gray.
If your mare is a dun(dun is like gray, it goes 'overtop' the original colour)
you could have one of the above colours with dun.
You can have dun and gray on the same horse.
Fleabitten is a term used more to describe the stage of gray the horse is at.
This info really doesn't narrow it down, just lets you know what you could have.
A friend had a gray stud that was nearly white in his old age. His colts were always interesting because his base was bay roan-pinto.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kristen B
Member
Username: Kris197

Post Number: 10
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Friday, Aug 11, 2006 - 11:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am thinking about breeding my buckskin with a full blooded fresian what do you all think.......I can get a pretty good deal on a breeding but I have to make up my mind by mon or tues because the vet is comming out to do swabs on two other mares that are going to get bred.My girl is a grulla
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vickie L White
New Member
Username: Vwhite

Post Number: 2
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Saturday, Aug 12, 2006 - 12:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kristen,
If you have to ask, I don't think you should. Your mare will have down time that you will not be able to ride her and there are alot of risks involved with foaling. Enjoy your mare and give it more thought.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lori
Member
Username: Maggienm

Post Number: 195
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Saturday, Aug 12, 2006 - 11:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kristen,
Are you wondering if breeding itself is a good idea, or if the cross would work. What breed is your mare?
Since you mention color are you hoping for a certain colour result?
Some questions to consider.
How much do you ride? Do you have a different horse to use while your mare is on maternity leave?
How old is your mare, if she is older and has never foaled there is increased risk.
Are your facilities foal safe?
Have you considered from breeding to riding is min 3-4 years.
I am sure I have missed a few important questions others with more experience could add.
You have referred to your mare as grulla and as buckskin. While I agree they can look fairly similar they are two very different colors.
A bucksin is bay that has been diluted with a creme gene.
Bred to a Friesan which is almost always homozygous(double)for black you could get;
black, bay, smokey black(black with the creme)once in a while a friesan will still carry a chestnut gene so if your mare also carried the chestnut gene there is a slight chance you could get chestnut, on this note if they both passed a chestnut gene and your mare is buckskin and she also passed the creme gene you could get a palomino,(remote but possible).
Grulla, on the other hand, is a black with dun overtop. So you could get all the above minus the smokey black and palomino, plus any of these colors could have dun overtop as well.
When trying to determine if you have a dun or buckskin remember that neither creme or dun can skip a generation, so one of the parents must be dun, buckskin, or palomino.
To see the difference between bucksin and dun look for leg barring, which can be very hard to see sometimes, lineback, wither stripe, ears trimmed in black.
A buckskin does not need a lineback to be a bucksin.
For more detailed info check out 'horse and pony color genetics.
You could do a search for theses colors to help you see the difference.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stacy Upshaw
Member
Username: 36541

Post Number: 165
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Saturday, Aug 12, 2006 - 9:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Isn't it awfully late in the year to be breeding? You end up with a mare heavily pregnant in the heat of summer, and more risk of things growing around and in your new foal with the heat and damp, at least that is what I thought was the general rule. Is it a myth that needs debunking?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kristen B
Member
Username: Kris197

Post Number: 12
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Saturday, Aug 12, 2006 - 10:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My mare is 15 yrs old,QH, she is a grulla, the fresian is homozygous for the black gene. I do have two other horses that I can ride, she foaled last year, this would be her 4th foal. She is a good mama.The women that owns this fresian has contacted me a few times in the last week, to see if I want to breed her, she fell in love with my mare and thinks they would make "beautiful babies" At this point I am just considering it,I do think the baby would be beautiful But I think I am leaning more towards waiting until next spring because like Stacy was saying I too think it is to late in the season, I posted a picture of her but it's not a very good one. I will have to take some better pics...........lol..............I've been slacking on the pictures this summer.Suzy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 887
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Aug 12, 2006 - 11:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

She is a beautiful mare.. i vote to wait till next spring..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lori
Member
Username: Maggienm

Post Number: 198
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Sunday, Aug 13, 2006 - 12:31 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Grulla is one of my favorite colors. Buckskin being my favorite.
I have never heard of things growing? Do you mean bacteria at foaling time?
This is exactly the time of year I bred my mare last year, her baby was born July 13.
Very hot summer temps aren't an issue for me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Erika L
Member
Username: Erika

Post Number: 352
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, Aug 13, 2006 - 7:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kristen, pretty mare. Can't see her conformation but wanted to bring up something that you have probably considered--but might not have.

The typical Friesian has an upright front (high set neck, higher action), a typical QH has a low set neck and often higher hindquarters.

Have you thought about how the two horses' conformation will meld on the baby? They don't usually "mix", but instead you might get the QH low set neck, but more action from the Friesian, or some other combo that might not be the best for whatever riding you do.

It's fine if you are planning to keep Junior, no matter what, but if breeding for sale,please make sure you have a purpose in mind so the horse has possibility of a good home.

Sorry, but this is kind of my "soap box issue". Too many unwanted horses out there so I say only breed if you are reasonably certain there is a market.

Personally, I'd keep and ride the mare. She looks lovely.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Shelley
Member
Username: Sswiley

Post Number: 209
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Sunday, Aug 13, 2006 - 11:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just for the record, I breed my mare for the first time, years ago. I waited till the end of her show season and bred her in september. She took the first cover and delivered the next summer. We had a few hot days, just like a typical summer in California and I made sure she had a fan and shade, but to be honest, she seemed fine. Of course she was a healthy 10 year old and has always been a good drinker.
I think it is a toss up whether to breed for a summer baby or one of those foals that have been targeted for the first of the year to take advantage of the age. I have always wondered how those babys are doing when I see them newborn in the middle of a February storm.
Either way you loss a good year of riding.
Dr O . . .? what is your take on breeding time ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christos Axis
Member
Username: Christos

Post Number: 1303
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Sunday, Aug 13, 2006 - 4:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

If you are breeding for top quality sport horses where every little bit of development counts, heat above 25 C is a thing to avoid during the last months of pregnancy and the first 3 months after birth, mainly because it suppresses appetite.

For leisure horses where a bit of smaller size or a little less muscle or bone does not matter, heat is not such a problem.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Patricia Bell
Member
Username: Boomer

Post Number: 92
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Thursday, Aug 17, 2006 - 1:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think it also matters where you live. My horses are in Eastern Washington where it get's cold really fast around the end of September. By October it's dipping into the low 20's or even low teens in the evening. I wouldn't want a two month old in that weather. My baby will be 6 months by the time the chill sets in. California on the other hand is usually fairly mild isn't it? I bred my TB mare to a Friesian in early July but she got sick with Guttural Pouch Mycosis (suddenly) and I had to euthanize her. I think the TB Friesian cross is fantastic.
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC