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Discussion on What causes a sway back?

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cp
Member
Username: Cpacer

Post Number: 267
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 9, 2007 - 10:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just out of curiosity. Is it the way a horse is brought up and trained, or hereditary?

In the past I've mostly noticed that cart horses seem to have deep sways--is there a connection? Do they become cart horses because they can't be ridden, does pulling a cart cause the sway, or do they have nothing to do with each other?
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Karen Trojnar
Member
Username: Karent

Post Number: 48
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 9, 2007 - 12:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

This is the info I got on swayback horses from one of the books I have. Maybe DrO can be more specific.

Swayback appears in three forms in horses. It can be present in a newborn foal, it can develop in horses during the first year, or appear in older horses. The old age form is more common in brood mares.

The newborn form is a component of neonatal contracture, the so-called contracted foal syndrome. This form is more commonly a scoliosis. Scoliosis is a lateral or sideways bending of the spine.

In older horses weight bearing over the years and multiple foals gradually stretch the ligamentous tissues of the vertebral column, allowing the column to sag into the swaybacked position.

Very few cases of juvenile lordosis have been examined at postmortem, and, as is so often the case, understanding of the disease process is hampered by lack of pathological data. In those cases which have been examined, however, there is a clear-cut and distinct anatomical reason for the lordosis. Anatomical is emphasized because even though the lesion which causes the lordosis is evident, the cause of that lesion is not known.
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Erika L
Member
Username: Erika

Post Number: 652
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 9, 2007 - 4:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

http://www.equisearch.com/horses_care/health/anatomy/swaybacks_081205/

Here is a link to a study on lordosis (swayback)
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 17465
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 9, 2007 - 8:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello cp,
Most horses that I see have it mildly when young and it worsens as they age and in some becoming quite remarkable with age. I don't think it has much to do with riding and in at least two cases appeared hereditary.
DrO
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cp
Member
Username: Cpacer

Post Number: 269
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 10, 2007 - 8:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

interesting. Thanks for the info and the link.
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