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Discussion on DMSO IV for the treatment of founder

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Valera A. Hascup
Member
Username: Vhascup

Post Number: 4
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Friday, Aug 22, 2003 - 8:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr. O: I apologize if you have covered this topic before. A knowledgeable horse friend of mine said that DMSO IV is useful in treating founder. My horse recently foundered, and is receiving the standard treatment of bute, banamine, isoxuprene, corrective shoes, no sweetfeed, turnout in a paddock with not much grass. He is still uncomfortable, and this regime was started on Monday. My friend told me I should take him to the clinic and have him receive DMSO. My question is, is it efficacious and what is the timing factor in receiving DMSO IV? He is a 19 year old Morgan gelding.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 8983
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Aug 25, 2003 - 6:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Valera,
There is no research into this question and it is not standard therapy. You can find some logic behind its use but whenever any inflammatory disease that should respond to IV DMSO is looked at it is hard to measure an effect.
DrO
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Valera A. Hascup
Member
Username: Vhascup

Post Number: 5
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Monday, Aug 25, 2003 - 9:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr. O:
Thank you for your prompt reply, and thank you for confirming what I suspected. My other question and concern is this: My Morgan gelding has been now on treatment for one week, with not a tremendous improvement. He has great difficulty turning, but once he's out of his stall and walking straight, he's better. He's 19, in magnificent condition as a dressage horse ready to compete at third, 4th level. He has become quite cresty this year, and we've been giving him a supplement of Quiessence daily. His insulin levels were high, but ACTH was normal. TSH levels indicated a slighly low thyroid functioning so he's on Thyrol L one scoop daily. The coffin bone has rotated in the right foot, I don't know the degree, and he developed laminitis in the left foot after treatment was started. The symptoms appeared very suddendly and were atypical initially: slightly lame in the right foot, initially diagnosed as a stone bruise. In your experience, in what time frame can I expect to see a turn around; will I see one at all; will be be rideable at all. I realize you cannot give me specific answers, neither can my vet; but I need realistic information to help me deal with this awful disease and do the right thing for my magnificent Morgan. Val
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 8998
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 26, 2003 - 7:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Nothing is harder to predict but it is possible you may have to deal with this for months, since being overweight is a contributing factor. I say this since he has become cresty this year. About the time you get some weight off you will start to see improvement. You need to review the articles on hypothyroidism in horses and perhaps the article on Cushings Disease. I do not think you have typical Cushings but look at the blue insert on the condition that has been termed "Peripheral Cushings".
DrO
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Valera A. Hascup
Member
Username: Vhascup

Post Number: 6
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 26, 2003 - 8:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr. O:
Is crestiness then, only associated with overweight horses?
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 9001
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Aug 27, 2003 - 6:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The crest is stored fat and develops when body condition scores of fat or above occur (see article on body condition scoring). MOrgans are certainly predisposed to a crest do to their easy keeping nature. Once formed it can be difficult to get rid of: the body does not use this fat easily so you can see it in thin horses, or more commonly thin burros.
DrO
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