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Discussion on Overflexion of the hock

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Isabella Forcella
Member
Username: Isabe

Post Number: 10
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 4:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr. O',

There is a horse in my stable who suddenly started to overflex one hock by galopping.
In italian we called this "arpeggio" and is normally observed at walk and trot, not at galop.
Somebody told the owner it should be arthrosis, but it seems to me a bit strange. Normally horses with arthrosis to the hock reduce the flexion istead of increasing it.
What do you think about it?

Thank you very much for your feedback.

Regards

Isabella
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 10454
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 7:40 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Isabella,
I am not familar with the term "arpeggio" is reference to horses. Are you talking about the disease called "Stringhalt" (see Equine Diseases Lameness Diseases of the Upper Rear Limb Stringhalt)? If so the article has a description along with a list of possible diseases that are confused with it.
DrO
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Isabella Forcella
Member
Username: Isabe

Post Number: 11
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 7:08 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear DrO,

Thank you very much for your reply. Yes, what I meant is Stringhalt. I read the article and in fact what was known to me is that this problem is normally more evident at walk than at trot and canter. In this case the problem increases drammatically at canter and is not present at walk. As I can understand this has nothing to do with arthrosis, which has a complete different type of lameness. Am I wrong?

Thank you for your feedback.

Best regards

Isabella
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 10465
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 7:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

As long as we both mean the same thing when you say "overflex the hock" I agree that this would not be a typical presentation for a arthrosis and would concentrate on the list of rule outs presented in the article on Stringhalt.
DrO
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Christos Axis
Member
Username: Christos

Post Number: 392
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Thursday, May 20, 2004 - 3:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Isabella,
Are you sure that this overflexion is involuntary?
There are several reasons for a horse to purposely overflex the hock, like too tight a girth or annoying rider's legs/spurs.
Some horses will try to "step" over the girth if you crank it up too fast / tight.
We have a mare that will successfully kick your heel off her side if you push her too much. At any gait, that is, and with no other complaint/ misbehaving.
Behavioural issues like these have to be differentiated from stringhalt, which is clearly involuntary.
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Isabella Forcella
Member
Username: Isabe

Post Number: 12
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2004 - 5:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Christos,
Sorry for answering only today, I have not checked the site for a while. I think the iperflexion is involuntary. I have not seen the horse for two weeks now (is not mine) but he has never done it before. What surprised me is what vet diagnosed: arthrosis. I saw many horses suffering from arthrosis and no one acted like this. I also wonder how a vet can diagnose arthrosis wihout X-ray.
Thank you for your input.

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