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Discussion on Eye Ulcer won't completely heal

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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 219
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 10, 2004 - 3:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Over 3 weeks ago my gelding came in with an eye injury-diagnosed as an eye ulcer. Treated it with AK spore for a bit-nothing...then treated it with Gentak 5 times a day, blood serum drops 3 times a day and Atropine 2 times a day(now once a day).

It has reduced to about half size-it is not big at all, but is still staining and just won't go away.

Any suggestions on what to do next-my vet does not feel it is fungal.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 10962
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Aug 11, 2004 - 9:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It sounds like it is healing Leah, just slowly. This prolonged healing would be normal if there was damage to the stroma Leah and not just the outer epitheal layer. I can see I do not have enough in here about healing ulcers (the article just covers the serious infectious cases) and will make it a priority. I will post when I get it up.
DrO
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 221
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Wednesday, Aug 11, 2004 - 12:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you Dr O---my vet is coming out late today or tomorrow--he spoke to an opthamologist (sp?) and felt it might be an indolent ulcer? One that has a film sort of over it, preventing it from healing properly?

Well I look forward to reading the updated ulcer information!
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 10972
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Aug 12, 2004 - 10:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

If it stops healing Leah, yes that is most likely. But so far your time frame and continued healing seem OK for a deep injury to the cornea. Not knowing how serious the initial injury is, I cannot know if this is too slow or not.
DrO
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 222
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Thursday, Aug 12, 2004 - 10:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The original injury was actually not very bad-he came in with a swollen eye-I assumed a sting at first, then found a broken board in his field...so I assume he scratched his face on the board. Once the swelling came down (about 24 hours), i could see a white spot about the size of....not even half an eraser head-maybe 1/3 if it were round in shape. not it is about the size of the hole opening of a ball point pen...

and again, this was about 3 weeks ago.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 10983
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Aug 13, 2004 - 10:23 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It is difficult to evaluate the severity by the size of the wound Leah, it is how deep the damage. While even a large wound to the outer epitheal layer heals very quickly, the deeper stroma can be quite slow and may even require blood vessels to invade the cornea to the damaged area to supply help with the healing.

Our stallion had a small but apparently deep wound to the cornea many years ago. Despite my best administrations, the recommendations of our local board certified veterinary opthamologist, and even a trip down to the opthamology department of NC State it took almost 6 months to heal and a small scar remains to this day.
DrO
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 223
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Saturday, Aug 14, 2004 - 7:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well I wanted to update you-the vet came out and stained his eye-the size of the ulcer had reduced. Since it is getting smaller and still on a healing path, he wanted to wait to scrape it. So just continuing with meds 4 times a day and restaining in a week.

Dr O if you are telling me you spent 6 months putting eye ointment in a horse's eye several times a day I will simply pass out now.
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 224
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 17, 2004 - 7:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O, I am curious how did you treat that stallion? Was it just triple antibiotic ointment or did you use additional or different medicine? Did you ever scrape his eye?

Did he have periods where it appeared he wasn't healing at all?

Yesterday Julian's eye showed elevated irritation...he was was puffy and squinty again so I restained him. We are sitting stagnant again.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11033
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Aug 21, 2004 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

NPB ointment 3 times daily, atropine and bute if the eye seemed painful. Yes there are times healing is aggravatingly slow, particularly during the time that neovascularization is occuring so that the stroma can be repaired. No, we did not ever get into what we thought was a indolent ulcer situation. Though he would have periods where the eye would become a little more painful the lack of purulence and the appearance of the eye not worsening ruled out infection for us but it should always be considered as this would be the very first sign of a worsening infection.
DrO
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 229
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Sunday, Aug 22, 2004 - 10:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Continuing the updates...a few days ago the vet did tranq him and "scraped" his eye withe sterile Q-tips...we are now treating 6 times a day, altnernating between to different eye ointments (tiple antibiotic and one that begins with a V--the name escapes me)....it appears to have reduced in size again...and holding steady at this new size.

I guess we will just plan on the long haul-at least smaller or the same is better than bigger!
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 231
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Sunday, Aug 29, 2004 - 7:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O, a question or two more for you if you don't mind ;) (seems you are the only one I can find that has an eye injury that took over a few days to heal).

During the 6 month period you were treating the eye, did you periodally stain the eye? Did it take up stain for the whole recovery time?

Did you ever use steroids after stain stopped showing up to reduce the scarring-if not, then why not?

After the scraping, the injury reduced again-now we are proceeding more how you treated yours. The equine opth wanted us to back off and let things handle themselves for a bit.

He is getting triple antibiotic ointment 3 times daily, is not puffy or tearing-which is good...but still is taking up stain.

All in all, I think we are on the upswing.
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Stacy Upshaw
Member
Username: 36541

Post Number: 30
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Sunday, Aug 29, 2004 - 8:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Leah,
Just wanted to add my own experience for you to consider...
7 years ago I had a mare caught in a bee swarm get stung directly in the center of her eye. I had the non-healing ulcer experience for almost a year, and many times considered having the eye removed, due to her pain and the eternal meds and monies. Her cornea healed over but was opaque for many years. In the last four months, the bluish-white cornea has started to disappear, revealing the pupil underneath! I add this only as a positive testament to staying with it - horses are amazing when it comes to healing! Stacy
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Leah Hinnefeld
Member
Username: Belhaven

Post Number: 232
Registered: 1-2001
Posted on Monday, Aug 30, 2004 - 7:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you Stacy...you sound JUST like my dad---"relax Leah, horses can heal themselves! Give it time"--and for the most part, I do believe he is correct.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11092
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Aug 30, 2004 - 8:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes we continue to stain. One of the ways I diagnose the need for debridement is looking for stain uptake under the margin of the edges of healing. To me this suggest a poor contact and improper healing. I never use intraocular steroids in an eye that has been traumtically damaged: it is prone to infection and needs a intact immune system.
DrO
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Wendy Gleason
New Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 1
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Monday, May 30, 2005 - 5:27 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My 11yr THB gelding has injured his left eye. He has been in the hospital for 10 days. He has a la vage in the eye for an ulcer and the treatment regimen has been aggressive every two hours. The eye has been scraped three times that I know of. Now the vet is saying he should go to UCDavis for a surgery to remove some dead cells??

He said he would feel more comfortable with an opthamology specialist performing the surgery. I understand his feeling. Yet my feeling is have I done everything possible to help my horse? Have I just wasted 10 days?? Possibly has this done any damage to the eye? The eye is not worse it is just not better.

The horse is wearing the eye cover that resembles a race horses blinker yet it is completely covered with very small air holes. The eye has been dialated with atropine the entire time by the hospital. The horse is also getting myconozole and the genticin. They are also using Banamine.(which from reading your site other people are using Bute?) He also gets a bran mash every day to prevent colic from the atropine.

I am looking for an equine opthamology specialist in Southern California or any where in California. Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 12973
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, May 30, 2005 - 10:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Why not UCDavis Wendy are you a long way from there?
DrO
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Vicki Zaneis
Member
Username: Vickiann

Post Number: 60
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Monday, May 30, 2005 - 8:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ulcerated corneas are very frustrating to treat and certainly require extreme care and treatment. I've lived in my barn treating such an injury that did come 100% right after treatment, which involved the atropine, banamine, and two eye ointments alternated, done every two hours. Treatment went on for a number of weeks, and had I not been able to do it myself could have sent my horse to the home of a Vet. Tech. who worked out of my Vet's office and will accept such cases. The banamine and atropine did not go beyond three days, however, though the eye ointments went on what seemed an endless time and the pupil dilation lasted for a couple of months, or more. In my case systemic antibiotics were not used. I would not do the bran mashes as the banamine is sufficient to prevent colic (give the banamine 45 minutes or so prior to the atropine ointment) and believe personally that bran mashes cause more trouble than they prevent.
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Wendy Gleason
New Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 2
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Monday, May 30, 2005 - 9:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, I am far away from UCDavis. I live in Pacific Palisades and all of the haulers are heading out for Spruce Meadows this week. I can't seem to book a hauler this Tuesday to go that far for one horse especially since the horse will not get in a two horse trailer. Although if you are telling me that UCDavis is the best without a doubt, I will go there.

I do want to be with the horse everyday as I have been the last two weeks. Now that I know how serious this is, I will take him anywhere. The vet told me, it was like a scrape on the knee nothing too serious. Yet we need to hospitalize and aggressively treat the eye every two hrs and wait and see.

I have found a Vet in Santa Barbara who studied under Dr. Alan McMillian Equine Opthamology Specialist for 35yrs of San Diego. This Doctor attends every Opthamology seminar, clinic, class, and has all of the high tech instruments and toys. He also has performed countless eye surgeries including corneal transplants.

What state are you located? Can I fax or email the horses med records to you for a consultation?

I am not sure if this is a proper question to ask, can you tell me if sending this horse to Dr. Charlie Boles at Specifically Equine Hospital with Dr. Dave Jensen who would perform the debridement and or surgery over UCDavis would be the right thing to do?

This is my first hospital experience in 42 yrs. I honestly do not know which hospital is the best and I am looking for the best.

I am very greatful this website exists! If there are any statistics on hospitals in California I would appreciate any info.

Sincerely,

Wendy Gleason
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Wendy Gleason
New Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 4
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 1:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I forgot to mention that my horse is also getting the blood serum treatment to protect and regenerate healthly cells.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 12980
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 9:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The questions are fine Wendy but I do not know those folks so cannot comment nor are there statistics on this type of work. Your own veterinarian should know best who would be the best choice for your area. If UCal is too far, perhaps asking their opthamologist for a local referral would help you decide. I would be glad to comment on any posting you have.

Concerning review of medical records we do provide such a service for a fee but I have to say Wendy, me reviewing an opthamologist' records on a eye disease would be a bit like the student judging the teacher.
DrO
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Wendy Gleason
New Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 5
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 - 9:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr.O,

It pains me to write this we were unable to save the eye. The opthamology specialist said that no matter where or when I would have taken the horse it would not have mattered. The damage was too severe to save the eye. So I had to save his life by removing the eye. I'll be in therapy, and the horse doesn't even seem to care at all. He is happy just to be home with me and his girlfriend Angel(a 28 yr old mare).

It has been 13 days since the surgery. The first day home I rode for 15 minutes on the flat canter stretching each way. He was very happy to be home and to have me on his back again.

The vet said no limits on his come back, but I am taking it slowly. The second day I couldn't help myself so we popped over a couple of crossrails and a 3' vertical. He jumped better with one eye than two. This is a horse that with two eyes would not touch a rail jumping 4ft 6" oxers. Now that he has one eye he can see his distances better, he is not racing at the fences like he used to try to do even though I would always talk to him and slow him down.

Throughout all of this I have been telling people to check their stalls for anything protruding even if the horses have been living there for awhile. My horse had been in this particular stall for two years. This last winter with the horrific rains shifted the pipe corral enough to shift the screws into my stall. Before the rains the screws were facing in a safe direction away from the horses.

I have obviously taken drastic measures to improve my horses stall. Now I check the stall daily. I would encourage everyone to do so, so they don't have to learn the hard way like I did.

God Bless all the animals and the people who care for them!!
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 720
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 - 9:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wendy, I'm so sorry your guy lost his eye. However, it sounds like he is having a remarkable recovery. As a word of encouragement, a lady a few miles from us has a beautiful QH stallion who had been blind in one eye for several years. She reins on him and you'd never know he only had one eye.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13143
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 15, 2005 - 7:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wonderful to hear he is coming back so strong Wendy.
DrO
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WTG
Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 8
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jun 18, 2005 - 5:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Sara,

Thank you so much for your support. We are getting along wonderfully. I am truly surprised.

Thanks again!!
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Shannon Rae
New Member
Username: Srae

Post Number: 1
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 - 11:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr.O-

I joined this sight in a desperate search for help on an eye issue. About 6 weeks ago my 3 y.o paint gelding had a watery eye which I initially thought was seasonal allergies, but about a week later the eye became completely cloudy. The first vet put him on atropine and triple antibiotic ointment because the eye actually held stain in a small area the size of half of a pencil eraser,the cloudiness went away and the white scar appeared.. the next vet put him on banamine, fluorbuprophin, and Cipro to try and penetrate deeper into the cornea, the white scar got a lot of vascular redness in it, and I was told it was healing. He also had his tear duct flushed by my local vet to check for abnormalities, it was fine. I then went to Texas A&M University to see a small animal opthamologist (only one avail) who first diagnosed him with a very deep corneal injury, then keratitis, but possibly a fungus and some uveitis....I walked away very confused and still needing answers, getting a lot of shoulder shrugging. He is on week 3 of banamine daily with atropine added every few days for pain, it will clear up when I block out the light, then swell again and cause him pain. I don't want to lose his eye, but feel I am not getting the right answers...I am being urged to have a corneal transplant as the only way to verify if this is fungal, or remove the eye...there has to be a better way. The trauma is deep within the cornea, the surface of the cornea is now perfect, no stain holds, but scarring and neovascularization seem pretty steadily there, pain and swelling seem to come when I uncover the eye for more than a day. It is now covered with a fly mask taped over to block out light, is there a better way to do this when you cannot avoid light altogether? Please help if you can! Sorry this is so lengthy

Shannon
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LL
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 124
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Friday, Jun 24, 2005 - 6:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Shannon,

DrO will advise you on the medical part, but as far as blocking out the light is concerned, you can get the kind of blinkers that racehorses wear. Each blinker is like a half-cup shielding the outside of each eye, so if you remove one half-cup and stitch it to the other, you have a complete cup covering one eye entirely.

I hope you find the correct diagnosis and the right treatment as soon as possible.

Good luck

Lynn
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 114
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Friday, Jun 24, 2005 - 5:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon,
How close are you to San Antonio? There is a very good ophthalmologist here.
Kathleen
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Shannon Rae
New Member
Username: Srae

Post Number: 2
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Sunday, Jun 26, 2005 - 1:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kathleen-

Only two hours, do you have info on how to contact them? His eye is looking worse in the last 2 days, very swollen and much more painful since I have been adding the miconizole, and with this going on over 6 weeks now I am frantic to get it fixed, actually had a vet at week two say this was no big deal and would heal on its own and to stop medicating him.
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WTG
Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 13
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Sunday, Jun 26, 2005 - 1:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Shannon,

I have just gone through the most horrific few weeks with my horses eye. The vet initially said it was like a scrape on the knee no big deal right??? Well the eye had to be removed on june 1, 2005. I am not a vet although I have had horses all of my life. My advice would be call an opthamology specialist. The first vet misdiagnosed a fungal infection when the horse actually had a bacterial infection in his eye.

This horse is a jumper so this has been especially difficult on both of us.

A horses eye is nothing to take lightly no matter what some vet says. Get a specialists opinion. I wouldn't want your horse to lose his eye like mine did.

Good luck!!!

WTG
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WTG
Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 14
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Sunday, Jun 26, 2005 - 2:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Shannon,

I forgot to mention that you can get what is called the eye saver. It is like a fly mask with a eye cup. It completely covers the eye with a strong plastic eye cup with small holes for ventilation. It is like a race horses blinker but only one eye is covered. It velcros onto the halter at the crown of the head with throat latch velcros as well.

Good Luck!!

WTG
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Nancy S. Kaplan
Member
Username: Redalert

Post Number: 127
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Sunday, Jun 26, 2005 - 10:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon,
HURRY and get him to a specialist ... if it is a fungal infection(or for that matter whatever it is), TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE! I hope you can get him somewhere fast, where the eye can be evaluated by a specialist, and get going on an effective treatment. One word of caution, since you mentioned the corneal transplant ... check out the stats on this VERY EXPERIMENTAL and most often UNSUCCESSFUL procedure. If you get to that, ask DrO about that one!
Good luck and many good thoughts are being sent your way from Georgia. Keep us posted!
Nancy
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 115
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Sunday, Jun 26, 2005 - 1:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon,
The vet's name is Dr. Bonney @ Animal Eye Hospital in San Antonio. His phone number is 210 349-5831. He doesn't do horses at his clinic, I had to take Yogi to my regular vet's place where he could be examined in a dark room if necessary and our vet was there to sedate if necessary. I believe he is a small animal vet who specialized in eyes. He is great. He couldn't save the sight in Yogi's eye, did a very thorough exam, including glaucoma test. We've had a few flare-ups in the last two years, but have been able to treat it ourselves (with vet approval) except for one time. Let me know if there is anything I can do. If you decide to come here, I can help with that also if you want.
Kathleen
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13230
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Jun 26, 2005 - 1:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon I think you are confused by all the terminology much of which has similar meanings. For instance he can have deep corneal injury and keratitis which may all be caused by an infection. It would be usual for the inflammation from such a infection to cause the uvea to become inflamed also.

It sounds like the only question is what is the initiating cause: infection, trauma, or further down the list would be autoimmune disease. A corneal transplant seems a bit extreme for a focal though deep corneal infection. Has no one suggested surgery to open the deep lesion so that it can be biopsied, cultured, drained and treatment can get to the source of the defect? I presume the eye is still visual?
DrO
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Shannon Rae
New Member
Username: Srae

Post Number: 3
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 29, 2005 - 4:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O and all who have posted on Cowboy's eye-
You are correct, it all was very confusing in the beginning with all of the names mentioned and the link not explained until I read several articles, the vet kept changing what she thought is was. To me, bacterial or fungal infection matters, they are different. I did go to another ophthalmologist in San Antonio (thanks Kathleen, got your message after returning, I saw Dr. Rainbow at Retama Park) He thinks the eye had a Stromal Abscess and has healed on its own (five days after visit to A&M with 5 days of praying for healing), I am now phasing off of Banamine to see if the pain returns, if so he thinks I need to go in and do surgery to deal with the abscess which the surface of the cornea may have healed over and trapped. Maybe I called it the wrong surgery...what would that be? He said it was close enough to the center of the cornea to heal itself and not as deep as the first Ophthalmologist thought. First good news, and I did know about the eye saver mask mentioned, it is a great mask for this type of injury and for future users with eye injuries you can find them at Jorgensen Laboratories in Loveland, CO. (970) 669-2500 for about $80.00. I think it is one of the keys to healing, NOT a fly mask with tape, too easy to re-injure the eye. Thanks all-will keep you posted reference his healing.

Shannon
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 116
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 29, 2005 - 4:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon,
Glad you made some progress. And thank you for letting us know about the mask. I will check it out. Our gelding Yogi needs some protection for his blind eye and I can't keep a fly mask on him for more than an hour.
PS - when you were at Retama, you were about 5 minutes from my house. And I didn't know there was an ophthalmologist there. Thanks again.
Kathleen
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Shannon Rae
New Member
Username: Srae

Post Number: 4
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jul 2, 2005 - 11:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kathleen-

Wow, that close huh! Dr. Rainbow does not work there, but he treats horses on Tuesdays and Fridays I believe. Another option to the eye saver mask is the Guardian Mask, that sounds more like what Yogi might need. Looks more like a fly mask with a protective eye cup that even has UV protection. Number for that is 760-564-7557 or www.horsemask.com

Cowboy's eye still seems to be on the upswing, even as I phase off of the banamine, must admit I am watching it like a hawk and am praying we do not go backwards!

Shannon
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 117
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Saturday, Jul 2, 2005 - 5:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon,
Thanks for the link. I ordered a Guardian Mask today. We'll see if we can keep it on him. Wish we had one when we went thru this with our mare a few years ago. Good luck and keep us posted.
Kathleen
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WTG
Member
Username: Angel77

Post Number: 26
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Thursday, Jul 7, 2005 - 5:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Kathleen,

Glad to hear you have had some good news!! The guardian mask has two velcro attachments behind each ear which attach to the halter and two long velcro that go under the jaw. Word of caution during my ordeal, I had to have my horses leather halter altered a little smaller so that it would be safe to attach the eye saver to the halter which apparently is how this device operates. Safety has always been my first thought in everything with horses.

Good Luck,

God Bless all the animals and the people who care for them

WTG
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Carla McKenzie
Member
Username: Jivete

Post Number: 11
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Thursday, Jul 7, 2005 - 2:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kathleen,

I've used the Guardian Mask on my filly for her blind eye for about 6 months and I like it pretty well, although it's rubbing a little without her winter coat to protect her. I use the one that's like a fly mask and keep it on 24 hrs a day since my girl is in the pasture. I removed the second eye (velcro and all, covering the rough edges with binding tape) though because it seemed to interfere with her vision a little and she managed to break the velcro strap in the first week but I've re-attached it and it's working fine.
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 118
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Thursday, Jul 7, 2005 - 4:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

WTG & Carla,
I ordered the one that is like a fly mask like Carla did. Yogi is out 24/7 on 5 acres of pasture and a lot of oak and cedar wooded areas. He came in one morning to eat and his eye was solid red, scared me. It apparently was some kind of leaking of blood? between the cornea and the lens? Don't know if he bumped it or not, but vet said it would be a good idea to try to keep a fly mask on him, at least have something between his eye and the rest of the world that will maybe give him some warning that he is too close to something. Also to keep the flys off so he will be less likely to rub that eye. Hope we can keep this one on him. It gets old really fast when we have to go out and find his mask in the woods.
Good luck to all who are dealing with horses with eye problems.
Kathleen
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Shannon Rae
Member
Username: Srae

Post Number: 6
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 12, 2005 - 5:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kathleen-
How is the Guardian Mask working out for you? I am happy to say that Cowboy's eye looks better each day, he still has a white scar and I am OK if that remains as long as I know he is not in pain. He is still wearing the protective mask while he heals, but when I take it off he does not seem to favor the eye much at all. I know the frustration of keeping the masks on, he has a buddy who keeps helping him out by taking it off even though it has velcro fasteners all over!

Shannon
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 119
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 12, 2005 - 5:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shannon,
Glad to hear things are going well for Cowboy. I haven't received the Guardian mask yet. I'll let you know when I get it.
Kathleen
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Stacy Upshaw
Member
Username: 36541

Post Number: 224
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 10, 2007 - 11:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello, has anyone got the phone # for the Guardian Mask folks? I really need to see the product and talk to them but the site and the related site horsemask.com are down when I try tonight. Any pics anyone has handy would be helpful too. I will be needing the mask designed for injury protection. Thanks, Stacy
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Stacy Upshaw
Member
Username: 36541

Post Number: 225
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, Jan 11, 2007 - 7:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

OK, the site is up and running this am, I hope my mare can benefit from this great product ASAP. She had an old corneal injury from 10 years ago that she re-injured over Christmas. Now she has a dime sized corneal ulcer, and as of Monday I was close to the decision to enucleate, a place I have been with her before. We're going to give her some more time, but the challenge of q 6hr meds is a big one, what with work and the non-horse spouse. Wish us luck, it looks awful but I have seen her recover from this point before. Stacy
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 1100
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Thursday, Jan 11, 2007 - 10:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Stacy, I have one of the masks, they are wonderful.. Good luck with giving her the meds...

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Stacy Upshaw
Member
Username: 36541

Post Number: 226
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Friday, Jan 12, 2007 - 7:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Ann, the saga continues. Yesterday, with Chelsea under local anesthesia and systemic sedation, Dr. Mims placed a lavage system through the eyelid. Boy, do I wish we'd done that immediately. Now it only takes one person to medicate her eye, and no fighting. The view of the eye was not encouraging. We are down to Desmecet's(sp) membrane in a dime-sized area. The blood vessels are moving in towards the deficit, but I was told they would not drop down into the hole to cover the membrane - the stroma would have to do that. I thought he would advise we take the eye, but he says we are not down to complete zero on her recovery chances yet. We will look again Monday.
I spoke to Sid at Guardian mask yesterday. What a really super guy and a motivational story about someone determined to make a better mousetrap. Their website at guardianmask.com is worth a look, even for horses with normal eyes, or just for us as horse people to know what is available.
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Karen McClure
New Member
Username: reinnrun

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2009
Posted on Sunday, Dec 27, 2009 - 12:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My friend has a horse that started with ulcer and recovered but re-injured and was not healing. It is not going to recover and I would like to know if the only option is to remove it or can the horse go on with the eye disentigrating and just monitor and treat any pain or tearing? The horse is 21 and unsure of the risks of removal. Please give some advice.
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Vicki
Member
Username: kpaint

Post Number: 535
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Sunday, Dec 27, 2009 - 7:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Karen, so sorry to hear about your friend's horse. Welcome to HA. There are many more people on this site more knowledgeable than I am; however, I will venture to say that the vet(s) examining the horse can best make the determination whether to remove the eye or leave it.

Also, you may have a quicker response from Dr. O and others if you create a new discussion with your question rather than attaching your questions to an old, but related, discussion. Go to the menu list and select Diseases, then select Eye Diseases, then select Corneal Ulcers... and that should get you to the section where you should post a your new question. There should be a button at the bottom of the page somewhere that states "Start New Discussion"--or something similar--I can't remember right now exactly what it states...

Wish I could be of more help.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 24245
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Dec 27, 2009 - 9:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome Karen,
Let me help you get started off right as there are several advantages to you if discussions are kept separate:
  • there is no confusion about which question is being discussed
  • it will help keep Horseadvice more organized
  • you review the Article and "ALL" the existing discussions
  • more folks are likely to see your post and so you will receive quicker and more responses

You will find the "Start New Discussion" button at the bottom of the "List of Discussions ". This list is on the parent page to this discussion along with an "Article". Getting there is easy, for example on this page:
  • Scroll to the top of this frame where you will find a navigation bar.
  • Click on the "parent page" link. The parent page is the page immediately preceding the title for this discussion.


Before posting you should review the article as you will find helpful information. If it does not answer your question and you don't see a related discussion that answers your question you should "Start a New Discussion" with your question. For more on this and other important information see Help & Information on Using This Site ยป Welcome to The Horseman's Advisor.

Thanks for helping us stay organized.
DrO
PS, by copying your post you can easily paste it into a new discussion.
PPS, many members prefer not to display there full name in their posts. You can edit this in your profile to display your chosen moniker.
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