Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Hard lumps under skin

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cynthia G
Member
Username: cgby1

Post Number: 170
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Saturday, Sep 29, 2007 - 2:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Quite some time ago I found a hard lump on my arab gelding just above and on the outside of his knee. I had my vet look at it and he wasn't too concerned about it, though he mentioned that draft horses seemed to get lumps like it on the back legs. Recently I found a very small one just behind his elbow by the girth and a couple days ago I noticed a much larger one on his knee. The one on his knee is not causing any lameness, he is eating normally and not losing weight. After I saw the thread on Paddy, I looked up lymphosarcoma and realized that cutaneous lymphoma described what I saw. Are there any other possible causes for these lumps and what should I have the vet do to diagnose this?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 19278
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Sep 30, 2007 - 10:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Cynthia, there are many common causes of lumps in horses and just finding a few lumps on your horse is in no-way diagnostic of lymphosarcoma. If you would like to see some of the causes see, Diseases of Horses » Skin Diseases, Wounds, and Swellings » Bumps / Nodules / Warts / Tumors » Overview of Bumps, Nodules, Warts & Tumors.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sharon Greiner
New Member
Username: caviar

Post Number: 1
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Sunday, Apr 27, 2008 - 10:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I purchased a GV 1 1/2 ago, direct from England he was 5. Did very little with him during that time - light riding, due to family schedule. this week I sent him to a wonderful driving stable to have him broke to drive. He also doesn't like being hose down, or getting his feet wet, so trainer agree, desensitize him would also aid in his driving abilities. Now, is where my problem begins, Titan, has bumps the size of grapes under his feathers so we clipped his feathers off to be able to treat is many bumps. Oh and he is off in the front.. Any suggestions as to how to get this under control, what to expect in the future, and is this a potential death sentence to my beautiful GV?? I thought I did all the homework before the purchase, but never heard or advised to check feathers daily...I do believe Titan has CPL .....Our vet is involved and has him on antibot, steroid cream, daily feet bathing.. My vet didn't have a name for this, I did a web search and strongly believe he has CPL..Many grape shape bumps, very painful for him.. rolls of skin on his just above his cor. band.. I'm horrified..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Erika L
Member
Username: erika

Post Number: 1199
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, Apr 27, 2008 - 11:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Sharon and welcome! Sorry to sound ignorant, but what is a "GV", and also what is "CPL"?

BTW, you might find more responses if you start your own thread. Click on the heading and go to the bottom of the list. Click on "Start a new discussion".

I hope your horse doesn't have anything life-threatening. Best of luck finding out what the problem is.
Erika
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathleen Carroll
New Member
Username: kfc330

Post Number: 1
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Monday, Apr 28, 2008 - 12:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Sharon... I'm afraid I also don't know what a GV is... but I have two Friesians, and have friends with Friesians -- so I'm familiar with problems with the skin under the feathers. This time of year is especially bad as you basically have a nice warm, wet environment under the feathers for bacteria, fungus, or insects to grow! And, if the area hasn't been treated for some time (which you mentioned not knowing to clean the feathers daily), the area can get very painful, so much so that my friend's horse actually stopped eating or drinking. Sounds like you have got a good start on the problem with your vet... if it is related to the feathers, it will eventually get better although plan on a constant battle! My boys have their feet cleaned with a medicated shampoo, their pasterns shaved short under the feathers (so I can dry the skin), medicated gel/oil, and every three months they are dipped for 10 mins. per foot in a mild insecticide! No kidding!! - and that's at the advice of the State University of Vet. Medicine. (I do live in the wet and soggy NW!)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathleen Carroll
New Member
Username: kfc330

Post Number: 2
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Monday, Apr 28, 2008 - 12:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi again Sharon... found out GV is Gypsy Vanner AND that they have white hair on the legs! Unfortunately, that makes everything I said about what I do on the Friesians even more necessary as the pink skin is even more sensitive than the dark. You didn't mention where you live, but you will want to keep him up and out of the wet as much as possible. I use a variety of things and will check out the names when I'm at the barn... but the best shampoo is Microtek for scratches, or baby shampoo - do not use iodine based shampoos as they are too hard on the skin. Keep the feathers clipped for now, they will grow back in no time! (I have to clip my boys about once a week.) Good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

SharonG
New Member
Username: caviar

Post Number: 2
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Monday, Apr 28, 2008 - 5:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

THank you all for your wonderful words and encouragement. GV - Gypsy Vanner - CPL is Chronic Progressive Lymphadema.. Scrubbing all feet, feathers off the front he will not let us touch his back legs, so tomorrow Vet coming to tranq. him to eliminate risk of injury to all .. we are using Microteck and steroid cream from Vet he is on antibo.. Not sure what the future holds for him.. Has your Friesians totally healed? I have Friesians also and never ever had anything like this in their feathers,,,, I feel so dumb..
Thanks again..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathleen Carroll
New Member
Username: kfc330

Post Number: 3
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Monday, Apr 28, 2008 - 11:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My boys have both been imported in the last year, and according to the Dutch - they all have this skin condition - and the Dutch don't do anything about it! I was running my hands over my big boy's pasterns and felt these hard areas (he was 5 yr. old)... his skin didn't feel like skin... it felt like rocks, or like he had additional bony structures under the skin, it was so hard. Anyway, a year later, I check on his feathers all the time, he has been checked for mites at least 3 times, and I just make his pasterns (and the backs of his knees) a priority. Both he and my stallion live at a very nice dressage barn 9 mos. of the year because I knew that I needed access to hot water for feather maintenance, as well as a dry riding arena. I shave them from the knees to above the ankle... think "poodle" cut... and also lift up the feathers and shave from top of pastern to top of coronet band. Side feathers conceal this shaving very well. While your boy is tranq'd, have your vet take scrapings for mites... I've never had them found on either of mine, but apparently many horses come over from Europe with them. My understanding is that keeping on top of the problem is what is most important, so those beautiful feathers are kinda "high maintenance" for sure! I don't think I can ever think of them as "healed" - unless it is August and very dry, but definitely "under control" and both horses have skin instead of rocks for pasterns. One last thing... stamping of the feet is one of the clues that there may be a problem - my very docile gelding kicked the side of the barn several months ago! That's when I started the sulfur (insecticidal) dip! (P.S. Don't do this if your boy's skin is open and weeping-your vet can give you other products to kill the mites if he has them-ivermectin cream for example.) Hope you guys get the situation under control!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20558
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 29, 2008 - 6:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello SharonG,
I am not personally familiar with Gypsy Vanners. I know they are draft types but uncertain if they are predisposed to CPL as are other draft breeds. We do have an article on this disease at Diseases of Horses » Cardiovascular, Blood, and Immune System » Chronic Progressive Lymphoedema (Lymphedema).
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

SharonG
New Member
Username: caviar

Post Number: 3
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 29, 2008 - 9:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you will review that article.
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC