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Discussion on Weanling QH filly 8 months with "ongoing" cold

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Dave Hill
Member
Username: Dhill

Post Number: 17
Registered: 5-2001
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 12, 2004 - 2:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a weanling QH filly now 7 months of age. For the last two months or more she has had an ongoing cold. A definite gurgle in her lung, snotty nose and a cough. The cough and snotty nose have not been constant but the gurgle definitely has been.

I have had our vet look at her at least 4 times, dispensing a number of antibiotics/penicillin etc. that I have followed and given her as directed. We have had her on Ventipulum? and as well have given her the flu and strangles vaccinations. This filly is extremely well cared for, and fed quality feed and has daily turn out on clean, green pastures. I am at a loss as to why I have not been able to get her to shake this. This weekend she had the cough back, she had a snotty nose and her gurgle was quite pronounced. The odd part is that she does not look or act sick. Her appetite is excellent and she had good energy????

Any thoughts????

Thanks!
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Virginia E. Brahmer
New Member
Username: Ginny

Post Number: 5
Registered: 11-1999
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 12, 2004 - 11:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have had the same problem with my 5 month old colt. He has been fighting an upper respiratory infection since August. My vet has seen him three times and each time he has prescribed sulfa tabs twice daily for 10 days. I have followed his directions religiously and made sure he had plenty of turnout. Each time he seemed to get better and then after a while the coughing and snotty nose would reappear. The last time I talked to my vet he suggested that the antibiotic was killing the "bug" but that my colt was not developing his own immunity to it and as a result he would catch it again. He put him on sulfa again and also on an immune stimulator for a week. I had hoped that this would work but I noticed tonight that he has a snotty nose again. Am I dealing with another respiratory infection or perhaps an allergy?
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Nancy Reynolds Kiester
Member
Username: Albionsh

Post Number: 65
Registered: 9-2001
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 12, 2004 - 11:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

This may fly in the face of all we try to do for our beloved horses, but let me share my vet's advice. He says to leave them alone, keep them from getting overly chilled, and give them plenty of tasty things to eat. The worst thing that will happen is that they might go off their feed because it doesn't taste as good as usual due to the cold. He says to not give antibiotics unless the cold turns into a more serious condition. The reason for this benign "neglect" is that they must develop their own immunities. So far it has proved to be good advice.
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barbara
Member
Username: Oscarvv

Post Number: 594
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 13, 2004 - 6:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Have you done blood work on your weanling? I would be concerned about the 'gurgling'. Has your vet considered a chest u/s?

I have one who has had a cold off and on for the last 2 months. She hasn't coughed but a few times. She has had no temp, cbc was normal and she is eating well. I have left her to her own defenses. She is in with two other weanlings and they have not gotten sick.
Often times these colds are viruses and need to run their course.

-B
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ANN COLLIER
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 427
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 13, 2004 - 10:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have to agree with letting them run the course, or that is what we feel around here.. I have two young horses, one that came home from a training barn ( 3 year old)with a cold, snotty nose and cough, she gave it to my yearling.. the 3 year old still has an exercised induced cough, clean nose... the yearling is going on two 1/2 months of snotty nose on and off and exercised induced cough.. the vet has been out checked lungs and throat.. his advice is to let it run its course.. neither has been off feed or run temps..

dang horses.. Ann


On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted the good ones!
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Nancy S. Kaplan
Member
Username: Redalert

Post Number: 7
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 13, 2004 - 12:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Dave,
I agree with most of the advice you have gotten...except for the fact that you can hear that gurgling sound, and that your vet has prescribed a number of antibiotics with no result. You could ask your vet about a transtracheal wash, which would give you the gram specific antibiotic and you could be done with it! Of course, as already stated most illnesses run their course and the youngster develops much needed antibodies on his own. SO, since the weanling seems to feel fine, and as long as their is no temp, maybe you can let it go unless the youngster starts feeling lethargic or spikes a temp. By the way,CONGRATULATIONS, a good horse always gets sick .So he will be a GOOD one!!!! NANCY
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Nancy S. Kaplan
Member
Username: Redalert

Post Number: 8
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 13, 2004 - 12:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

oops,SHE,WILL BE A GOOD ONE!
NANCY
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Dave Hill
Member
Username: Dhill

Post Number: 18
Registered: 5-2001
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 13, 2004 - 4:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for all the feedback. I too am a huge proponent of letting them be and letting "it" run the full course. I actually tried this theory on her when she first came down with the symptoms. Build up those antibodies and they will be better in the long run for it! However that being said here we are 3 months later and really it is the gurgle in her upper lungs that concerns me. I can live with a runny nose and the odd cough, heck they all go through that. I have asked our vet to do a transtracheal wash and I also know we are thinking of "scoping" her lungs in the next few days.

And yes she is a good one!

Thanks!

Dave
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11343
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Oct 14, 2004 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello All,
We really do not have enough information to know whether Dave has a serious problem or not, this would require a thorough exam. It is very commom for foals (and children) to develop a chronic snotty nose or cough follwing a respiratory infection that might take weeks or even months to completely abate. The tissues have to heal and because the upper respiratory system is constantly under attack (whether you give antibiotics or not), it takes a little longer. That said there are also some forms of lung infections that are chronic and serious.

The fact that otherwise the foal is healthy argues against this possibility but there is more information at, Equine Diseases Respiratory System Foal Pneumonia: Rhodococcus.

Concerning this noise you really cannot hear gurgling in the lungs without a stetascope, these are sounds are most likely referred from the trachea or farther up the upper respiratory track. I agree that this needs to be checked into.
DrO
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Dave Hill
Member
Username: Dhill

Post Number: 19
Registered: 5-2001
Posted on Thursday, Oct 14, 2004 - 2:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Dr!

All noted. Our vet has seen her regularly over the last few months and has listened to her lungs every time. Thus I can confirm the upper respiratory gurgle. He currently has her on Gentamicin (spelling?) and has given her a steroid to boost her immune system. He made note that she has a "very" dished face and that perhaps her airways are hindered because of it and that could be causing some of the breathing noice we can hear without the stethascope? She is a QH but wondering if you have experience with some Arabs have issues with their breathing depending on the dish in their heads?
I have passed faxed our vet the info/reading you suggested and am waiting for him to call me when he gets back in to his office.

Thanks!
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Nancy S. Kaplan
Member
Username: Redalert

Post Number: 9
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, Oct 14, 2004 - 7:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Dave,
I own Arabians and Arab crosses all of my life, and their dished heads have never presented a problem with breathing, so cross that worry off of your list, unless your filly has a dish like I have never seen before! NANCY
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KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 100
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Thursday, Oct 14, 2004 - 8:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Nancy,
Ditto that.

Dave,
Your vet actually said that the dished face could hinder her breathing?

Kathleen
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11351
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Oct 15, 2004 - 1:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I agree with Nancy and Kathleen, we are talking about the breed with the most endurance. It does not mean that this individual might not have some problem but I don't think it has to do with his Arab characteristics. Also the steroid thing has we wondering as it decreases the ability of the immune system to fight infection. On the other hand it also decreases a lot of the symptomology associated with inflammatory diseases.

My last comment is that if antibiotics are warranted gentocin alone has a fairly narrow spectrum and should be used in combination with potentiated sulfas or penicillin.
DrO
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Little King Ranch
Member
Username: Eoeo

Post Number: 85
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, Oct 15, 2004 - 2:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Glad to see your response DR.O as it reinforces my thoughts that I hesitated to post, especially the steroid part. I think a second opinion might be warranted here. This vet seems to have some treatments and thoughts that go against the norm.
EO
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