Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Easier botfly egg removal?

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stacy Upshaw
Member
Username: 36541

Post Number: 41
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Friday, Jan 7, 2005 - 1:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi everyone. The last discussion I found on this subject was 9/00. I know of the knife and stone for removal but now with two kids under two I need to move faster! Haven't they invented a spray or salve that will cause those sticky suckers to drop right off? We do have a man on the moon AND an International Space Station!:-) Stacy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christine C. Mills in NC
Member
Username: Chrism

Post Number: 1061
Registered: 4-1999
Posted on Friday, Jan 7, 2005 - 2:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

As long as your worming program is regular and covers bots, the removal of bot eggs is mainly for appearance.

I use a lava stone which works quickly and effectively. It is the same type of stone used to grab loose hair off of a dog's coat. I don't use a bot knife at all.

Be sure to press fairly hard with the lava stone when you are dragging it across the hair with bot eggs.

One stone will last several years.

Cheers.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11794
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Jan 8, 2005 - 1:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have read that sponging down the infected areas with very warm water will get the bots to hatch out making removal easier over the next few days. I do not have any more details (do you need to do this more than once?) and have not tried this so let me know what happens.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Leona Hill
Member
Username: Jlhill7

Post Number: 9
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, Sep 22, 2005 - 8:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am not very smart when it comes to horses. But I went out to my horses tonight and they have little yellow lice looking things on them. From what I guess it is bot fly eggs. Do these need to be removed and is there anything else that I should be aware of?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Zaneis
Member
Username: Vickiann

Post Number: 108
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Thursday, Sep 22, 2005 - 10:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

There is a fly spray I've seen in catalogs in the past that you can spray onto the eggs that is supposed to kill them. It is more expensive than regular spray and I only seem to buy it in the years I have no bots! It is very strong and smells almost like flea killing chemicals. I've seen and used the stones, bot knives and some stuff you can dump on before using the stone ("remover")that is supposed to make them come off easier, but that just seems like some kind of silicone spray, like Show Sheen so would improvise rather than purchasing that product again. I have read both to sponge and NOT to sponge them with warm water because that will make them hatch faster, but not necessarily prevent ingestion. Standing and watching a bot fly, they seem drawn to darker colored horses as their first preference and suspect it is because of the heat absorbed by the dark coat color. When I get the eggs on my boys I scrape them off with the stone and also make sure to use an Ivermectin wormer for my next worming or two.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Leona Hill
Member
Username: Jlhill7

Post Number: 10
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Friday, Sep 23, 2005 - 12:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Okay all I just wormed them with Strongid which does not cover bots. When should I worm them again with Ivermectim?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Little King Ranch
Member
Username: Eoeo

Post Number: 207
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, Sep 23, 2005 - 12:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wait until after the first hard frost if you are in an area that has all four seasons. Warmer climates I am not familiar with. EO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13765
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Sep 23, 2005 - 8:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Leona,
Since Strongid does not kill the larval forms of any of the the parasites. As this is a important component of the parasites life cycle, we don't recommend its routine use. Check out these 2 articles:
1) Equine Diseases » Colic and GI Diseases » Parasites and Worms » Bots (Gastrophilus spp)
2) Care for Horses » Deworming & Parasite Control » Overview of Deworming.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Zaneis
Member
Username: Vickiann

Post Number: 109
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Friday, Sep 23, 2005 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

In central Florida our bot season seems to start in October and we would worm with the Ivermectin the following worming or two. When done properly, bots will disappear from a farm unless there are other horses near that do not practice good control.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Judith L Gordon
Member
Username: Jgordo03

Post Number: 16
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Friday, Sep 23, 2005 - 3:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I was just thinking about asking the same question Vicki asked. Do you think some kind of oil would smother them? Like Olive or Apricot kernel oil? It wouldn't hurt the horse to ingest the oil, and I would think the bot egg would need air to hatch.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13772
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Sep 24, 2005 - 10:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Apricot kernel oil(?), how about something cheap like mineral or baby oil? Others have written this works but I have not seen any research or other proof.
DrO
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC