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Discussion on What is the longest a horse can go w/o bowel movement?

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brian anderton
New Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 10:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have 2 mares with impaction colics. Both are mildly uncomfortable but manageable with banamine. The first is 9 months bred and has passed about all the mineral oil we have put in her but no manure. She had 20 liters of IV fluids for 3 days and then fluids via tube till now. Her kidneys are working and seems fairly comfortable but no bowel movement now for 7 days. She did drink about 3 gallon of broth last night made with warm water and pelleted feed. The 2nd mare is a little more uncomfortable and has passed no oil or anything. She looks fairly perky and we are doing the same things to her as the first mare. Her gut sounds are loud as you can her without a stethascope. Sounds like she has a barrel of water slashing around and may have since nothing seems to be getting by. I have not heard this mare pss any gas either. Both mares have been ridden in a trailer all over our county 2 times each day as well as a light jog for 15 min. under saddle. Just wandering at worst case how long could this go on with a hopeful outcome. Thanks Brian
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Sara Wolff
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Username: mrose

Post Number: 3463
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 11:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am assuming one of the trailer trips included a trip to the vet??
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brian anderton
New Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 2
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 11:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, they spent 3 days at the vet clinic and then we had to make decision to bring home. We try to do everything within reason but surgery was not an option considering expense and value of the mares. The vet doesn't think either is twisted but I am not sure on the 2nd mare. He thought if they were twisted they would be in alot more pain and dead by now. We are cautiosly optimistic that they will turn the corner but so far no such luck. We have not yet give up as we can do the tubing and additional IV fluids if necessary at home but how long can this go on before they die??? or get better.
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 1848
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 5:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian are your horses eating normally? I almost would have to think if they haven't passed any manure for seven days that they would be very very uncomfortable or dead. Are you sure they haven't gone somewhere and it was missed? I'll be curious what Dr.O. has to say about this.
Good Luck
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20154
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 7:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome Brian,
Concerning prognosis it is not a matter of how long they can go without passing manure. It is a matter of what the condition of the bowel is. Following their heart rate and vital signs will give you a better idea of your horses condition and prognosis than the number of hours since their last poop. For more on this see, Diseases of Horses » First Aid » Taking Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. As outlined in the article be sure they get at least 6 gallons of water, electrolytes, and vitamins a day, by tube if necessary.
DrO
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Elizabeth Kaufman
Member
Username: ekaufman

Post Number: 400
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Friday, Feb 29, 2008 - 9:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Brian,

Years ago I had a horse who impacted for 8 days. He did clear eventually, but the aftermath to the colic was a lethal laminitis/founder.

After the fact, I heard that laminitis is a frequent follow-on to a prolonged impaction (is this correct, Dr. O?). So if your mares do clear, I would suggest being very alert to the complications that may follow. I would assume that the pregnancies might also be at risk.

Good luck. It sounds very unpleasant for you and for the horses. I have no suggestions that you haven't already tried. Please let us know what happens.

- Elizabeth
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20155
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Mar 1, 2008 - 8:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

No Elizabeth I would not call founder a frequent sequelae to impaction perhaps the keyword is "prolonged". Anything that disturbs the integrity of the bowel can potentially result in founder so there can be a causal relationship if the impaction goes on long enough.
DrO
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Melissa Baker
Member
Username: mysi

Post Number: 192
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Sunday, Mar 2, 2008 - 7:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,
It's been a couple of days since your post, I was wondering how your mares are doing???
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brian anderton
New Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 3
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Monday, Mar 3, 2008 - 9:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well I just got back to the computer and its Monday morning and 10 days and still no change. One mare did have just a little small ball of manure when we palpated yesterday evening. It was very soft and I believe it must have worked past the impaction and not part of it. We are steadily tubing with 1 1/2 gallon of water and a vitamin supplement added to it 4 times a day. The mares seem to be getting a little bloated but neither has had to have any banamine in the last couple of days. While they don't seem to be just real bad uncomfortable they do seem to be a little more depressed. One time they look worse and next time they seem to look better... Still hoping for a fruit for our labor but to be honest we are getting a little tired and patience is running low. Thanks Brian Anderton
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brian anderton
New Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 4
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Monday, Mar 3, 2008 - 11:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr.O, Would allowing these two to graze on a little green rye grass say for 15 minutes a couple of times a day help to get things moving on through. I know we don't want to make matters worse but I know green grass is also like a laxative to a healthy horse. I have a field that we were holding off grazing for a couple more weeks that has real good rye grass about6" tall.
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Jo Ann Widner
Member
Username: jowidner

Post Number: 38
Registered: 5-2003
Posted on Monday, Mar 3, 2008 - 9:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian, I can well imagine that you are feeling the effects of this extensive care routine. Is there anyone who could help out and give you a little breather? If not with the horses then maybe with some of your other responsibilities? You know, all those non-horse things that we all have to do .

This has been going on for a while but I think that its encouraging that the mares haven't gotten worse, even if they don't seem to be making much progress either. Hang in there. The grass sounds like a good idea to me but of course Dr. O would be the one to say for sure.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20171
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 7:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian I disagree that anything can pass the impaction so a little bit came off the back of the impaction is encouraging assuming the diagnosis is correct. My opinion is that any food you put in the front will just add to the impaction.

I believe that it is best to treat prolonged impactions with a oral isotonic electrolyte solution. For a inexpensive homemade electrolyte recipe and how to make a near isotonic solution using it see Horse Care » Equine Nutrition, Horse Feeds, Feeding » Electrolytes and Dehydration in Exercising Horses. I would be using 6 human vitamins once daily in the mix (not some horse vitamin supplement see article on vitamins as to why). Of course this all needs approval by your veterinarian.

Since the horses started out dehydrated, which makes horses look gaunt, the "bloating" may be be a sign of rehydration. The fact that they have become more comfortable argues against intestinal gas. I have treated impactions as long as a week so I understand the growing weariness but the alternative, as I understand your situation, seems to be to give up on these horses. I think continued treatment has a fair chance of working if a food impaction is the cause and I would continue to treat until the horses become uncontrollably painful or hopefully well.
DrO
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Corinne Candice
Member
Username: corinne

Post Number: 1283
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 9:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian hang in there! I know it's hard to be a constant care giver as many on this site can attest but hopefully the fruits of your labor as you say will be seeing them grazing and leaving more manure piles that you wish to muck out!
I am praying for your mares. Please if you get frustrated and signs don't point either way and you feel weary don't forget we are here for support! Once again hang in there! You are doing a great job and they will be indebted in their own horsey way if they are able to turn a corner.

May prayers!

Corinne
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brian anderton
New Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 5
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 9:34 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well the open mare was down yesterday afternoon when I came in from work. I decided to try a little more mineral oil and gave her a 10cc banamine. I did not give water at this tubing. I then turned her out in a lot for a little while where she was up and down alot and mostly down not in a resting position but flat out. A couple hours later she became more painful and the mineral oil had gone thru by looking at her rearend. She had a bad smell as well. We brought her back in to the barn as we were expecting severe weather and tubed another 1 1/2 gal water and vitamin mix down her at which this time she seemed like the water hitting her stomach made her extremely uncomfortable. And yes it went in the stomach. I put her in stall and she immediately hit the floor rolling and thrashing like what I have always seen in a colic and appeared to be giving up. I decided it better to let her die in the pasture than have to try and remove her from the stall so we finally got her to get back on her feet and led her to the pasture where she went down a couple of times along the way. I took the halter off and said goodbye. NOW this morning I went out to see where she was at so I could tell the backhoe man and she was UP and I made the decision to leave her alone and "trust in the Lord and lean not unto my own understanding" I will let you know how it goes. The bred mare still has no bm and I turned her back out in a lot with some green rye grass and water. I know this is not what you recommend but my logic was when I eat breakfast in the morning it triggers my guts to GO. We are not amatuers in the horse business as we own about 55 head and have been raising performance TWH for 25 years. Neither us, our vet, or anyone else around us has had a colic episode last this long. We are now left with one option, Hope.
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Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1623
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 11:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,

Sending "moving" prayers to your mares! How's that for some much needed humor, and poetry to boot, huh?

My gramma, age 88 1/2, swears coffee gets her moving every morning, in more ways than one. Maybe you should brew a big pot of coffee for the mares?

More seriously, ( I was serious about the prayers, wouldn't joke about that) I hope that left to nature, they just plain recover on their own.

It seems to be a bad winter for lots of troubles, so you are not alone with the worries. Heck, for the 1st time in 19+ years, my 4 got out into the neighbors woods. Luckily, they just looped around into our woods and come back into the yard. I was scared to death when I had no horses in the pasture. Roads were solid ice and I envisioned the worse!

This morning, I did a big NO NO, and left one stall open so my oldest mare got out into the aisle where I had stacked some moldy hay I didn't want them to eat....grrrr.

We all need spring like NOW...I bet that little bit of green grass you've got, and the movement of grazing, will help the girls.

Keep us posted, Hoping for the best!
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Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1624
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 11:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

P.S., have you checked into accupressure points to help relieve pain? I don't know the points myself, but I bet someone does and it might be helpful. Just a good hands on massage to the area might help too if you haven't done that already.
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Little King Ranch
Member
Username: eoeo

Post Number: 327
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 12:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Okay, you have done everything under the sun so far. Try this. Get some Gas-X from the drugstore. Take 14 of them and crush them up or grind them into powder with a small coffee grinder. Mix them into smoe apple sauce and administer them orally with an old empty bute or banamine paste syringe. Just suck it up into the syringe and administer 14 of them to each mare. I would give them another dose in about 4 hours. We had a 17h TB mare that did this same thing and we did all the mineral oil and stuff which she passed. Then we did the gas-x. After 3 days of little or nothing, I went out to give her another banamine shot about 12 midnite. She was laying down though in an upright position for the first time. She heaved herself up and it sounded like a shotgun going off. She splattered the back wall. After that she was fine. It was a pocket of gas that was blocking her. She never had a problem after that. Keep us posted. EO
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Little King Ranch
Member
Username: eoeo

Post Number: 328
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 12:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I forgot to mention, this mare was a month a way from foaling and she did foal out just fine. EO
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Fran C
Member
Username: canter

Post Number: 1410
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 12:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,
I cannot offer any advice, but do want to extend my hope that both your mares will fully recover. I think I would probably be going out of my mind with worry, right about now...I can only imagine the stress you are going through.

Best wishes for a positive outcome.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20177
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 6:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian, the problem with your reasoning is that when you need to go in the morning you do not have an obstructed bowel, if you did you would vomit up the new food, unfortunately something horses cannot do. You you feel you have to feed, which will usually cause impacted horses to become more painful, why not return to the pelleted slurry? If you let them out how will you monitor their fecal output? You are still 4 days short of the longest I have treated a impacted horse and I have never lost a impaction or had to send it to surgery.

While we are appealing to God remember he designed horses to consume water daily. If they do not drink it on their own it is your charge to replace it. If you need to go down get a fecal ball from another horse and put it is a jar of water so you can see how fast it will melt. And since you are giving them water, be sure to include the other things they were designed to get: the electrolytes and vitamins.

LKR, making sure the horse has adequate water intake is not really something that should be stopped. Gas-X is a surfactant and while ruminants do suffer from a frothy bloat situation where surfactants are useful, horses do not. I suspect your horses "blow out" was not a result of the simethicone. That said some believe surfactants have some other uses in colic, mainly helping hydrate the fecal mass, and DSS is sort of like super Gas-X. But if Brian will put the Gas-X in a gallon and a half a water and tube it in, best with electrolytes, that would suit me fine.
DrO
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Tonya Bauer
Member
Username: pbauer

Post Number: 412
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 9:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Brian,

The decision to just: "I decided it better to let her die in the pasture than have to try and remove her from the stall so we finally got her to get back on her feet and led her to the pasture where she went down a couple of times along the way. I took the halter off and said goodbye."

This beautiful mare that has probably given you (x number of babies), and even if this is her first...she doesn't deserve that kind of treatment. You are the caregiver, and responsible for every detail of this pregnancy that YOU brought about or let happen. To let her just wonder off and die with all the pain that you are fully aware of...and that she has endured is just reprehensible!

Very Angry,
Tonya Bauer
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Little King Ranch
Member
Username: eoeo

Post Number: 329
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Mar 4, 2008 - 11:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Holy cow, I am sorry if my post came across that Brian should do this in place of tubing the water he has been giving. Absolutely, he should continue the other things he has been doing. I was just suggesting that he try this also, in addition to the other treatments. Sorry if I confused anyone. EO
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brian anderton
Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 6
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 5, 2008 - 9:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

First, Tanya I believe if you will notice the treatment and hours and days we have been devoting to these two you will realize that we are very concerned and caring. By the way this is the open mare. I also have sense enough to know this is a horse and not a human. I will do all in my power to try and meet their needs. Now as of today, Both mares were up in pasture this morning. The bred mare was tubed and yes we did try LKR's advice and added some gas x to her water electrolite solution yesterday. She seems to me to be bloated as she has been before we turned her in lot on green grass. She is markedly depressed looking. I have not heard her pass any gas while we were working with her as she was earlier in the treatment. Upon palpation the foal is not detectable now and intestines are felt very distended our vet thinks that maybe the foal has moved to the bottom of abdomen and intestines to top??? Whatever, we are continuing with water treatment till something happens. The OPEN mare was up yesterday and this morning but no doubt not at all well. ONE THING, when she got down the other night in such great pain and appeared to be dying she did pass minerial oil as this was the first time any thing at all had come thru her and she had probably had 5-6 gallons of it in her. Now she could be unstopped but at the time I suspected her to have ruptured internally because of her dramatic pain and the fact that the last time we tubed her she acted like the water hitting her stomach was killing her. SOOO now she is standing and moving with the herd and is eating some. I will check her this evening and see if she is getting dehydrated again and tube more water if necessary, my hope is she has passed the impaction and what she has eaten 2 days ago will be evident on palpation. Thanks for MOST everyone's imput and special thanks to DR. O Brian Anderton.
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Nicole Tucker
New Member
Username: rorien

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 5, 2008 - 10:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Brian,

I've been following this post from the beginning, and log onto the website several times a day to see if there's any updates on your mares. I applaud your efforts, and persistence, to do everything you can for them.

I don't have any advice, or ideas on things to try now, but just wanted to say that I'm praying for you and your mares.

I can understand not being able to choose surgery for horses. I, too, am not in a position financially to see surgery as an option for my horses, when I also take into consideration their monetary value. As much as I love my horses (trust me, they are what keeps me going sometimes), I could not see putting them through something like that, when alot of the time, you end up with diminishing returns. That, and the money I would spend on surgery could rather be used to ensure my horses cross the Rainbow Bridge, and forever be pain-free, and then find another horse that needs a home.

I do question, though, why you would just turn the open mare out, when you knew she was in such horrible pain, and fully expected her to die in pain. Why not have a vet come out to put her down? Or, at the very least, put a bullet in her head? At least then her suffering would be over. But, maybe you saw something in her, or knew deep down she'd pull through it anyway? I don't know, I'm not there, so I don't know the exact circumstances, but am just trying to understand them.

Anyway, keep us updated on your mares. There are probably many many people watching this thread, who appreciate your updates, but who have not commented. =)

Nicole
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Elizabeth Kaufman
Member
Username: ekaufman

Post Number: 418
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 5, 2008 - 10:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

You know, I think one of the greatest struggles for us as horse people has nothing to do with horses. It has to do with people, and learning to withhold our judgment unless we have full knowledge. We are all horse lovers on this board, with different resources and experiences and values for the care and treatment of those horses.

All we can do is offer Brian our support and advice, such as we can. For those who disagree with his choices, remember that words are like riding aids-- the lighter the better.

Brian, I'm hoping for good news soon.
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jos
Member
Username: paardex

Post Number: 571
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 5, 2008 - 1:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well written Elizabeth!
Please keep us updated Brian, I keep my fingers crossed.
Jos
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Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1626
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 5, 2008 - 6:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,

I can't top Elizabeth's words. Well said.

I know you are a horse lover; otherwise you wouldn't be posting on here for guidance and support. Their fate may have been decided long before you even knew they were ill. And it may not make any difference whether you did anything or not, but bless you for trying to do all you can for them.

Looking for good news tomorrow!
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brian anderton
Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 7
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Wednesday, Mar 5, 2008 - 8:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well thanks to everyone for your support, we really do appreciate it from the bottom of our hearts. The good news is the open mare that I would have bet everything I own would have been dead Tuesday morning has appeared now to be recovering. when we went to catch her up today she had a B/O while laeding to the barn!! Then upon palpation she had a lot of manure in that area as well. Her intestines still seem to be full but we turned her in lot with lots of new rye grass and she had 2 more large soft piles before dark. Now none of what I have seen was dry or hard which leads me to believe the water and prayers worked. I do not feel we are out of the woods yet as she looks very depleted now which may should be expected. She is drinking water very well and eating some but not like a starving horse, just nibbling. It may be that the other night when she was in so much pain and appeared to be dying that everything was breaking loose, I don't know. She looks alert and better now. As for the bred mare she was dead this afternoon. Autopsy was hard to say but possible rupture, and uterus and colt had definatly moved out of normal position. There was probably 3 to 4 5gal bucket full of soft wet hay in her. There was a enormous amount of gas as well and a lot of water and fluids in abdominal cavity which leads to a possible rupture thinking. maybe that she ruptured after she died as she had been dead for at least 3-4 hours before I got home. I hated to loose this mare as she was about 20 year old and had produced 2 world champions. Now for the mare that is still living and appears to be turning the corner is there anything special we need to do for her to help get her back strong again, probiotics, ulcerguard ?? Also if she does continue to recover is she going to be safe to AI this spring. Brian Anderton
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Lee
Member
Username: paul303

Post Number: 1052
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 1:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

So very sorry Brian. That's a hard way to lose a good horse.
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Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1627
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 7:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,

I am sorry you lost the mare and the foal. From a woman's point of view, I'd say wait to breed the other mare til next year. I think she's had enough stress on her body for awhile. Pregancy is taxing to a body!

When you get a chance, love to see pics of the horses. We had a TW mare and foal years ago. I had to sell the colt and still miss him. I keep hoping to run into him again, so my ears perk up whenever someone mentions they have TW...but he wasn't shown as far as I know, but I still love to see pics of these mares if you feel up to it.

(((HUGS)))
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jojo
Member
Username: jojo15

Post Number: 1004
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 7:31 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

so sorry to hear you lost the older mare. and i've been following this throughout.

I'm curious what made 2 mares go down like that together? and not the other horses. have you identified the culplrit? i just find it so odd that two had the same issues at the same time.

i'm not fluent in any pregnancy issues, so bear with me if this sounds like a stupid question, but wonder could an ultrasound have shown anything? or helped determine if surgery would have been feasible? was the foal forming incorrectly, or malpositioned in such a way its foot was causing the blockage? and can one maneuver things from the outside? or in thru palpation? or at that point doing something to abort the foal? to save the horse? i know all these questions are after the fact the mare is already gone, so these are just what if curious questions...

hope the other recovers.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20191
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 8:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

One success, one failure it is hard to know whether to cheer or cry. Considering where we started from, impacted for the previous 7 days, I tend toward a somber cheer. Brian were you able to identify where in the lg bowel the impaction occurred?

At this point she needs to be returned to what her system is adapted to. Back on grass would be my first choice but otherwise you want to return her to good quality hay of the type she is used to eating. For recommendations on preventing further colics, especially impactions, carefully review the Colic Overview article. Let's get her completely well and on a normal diet before we look at the upcoming breeding season.
DrO
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Nicole Tucker
New Member
Username: rorien

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 8:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,

My condolences on the loss of the mare and foal. It's hard losing them, but rest knowing that you did everything you could for her.

Still sending healing prayers to the surviving mare. Sounds like she may be on the mend, and that's awesome!!

Nicole
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Erika L
Member
Username: erika

Post Number: 1159
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 8:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

What a terrible ordeal you've all been through!
So sorry for the mare that died. It sounds like she fought very hard to make it.
Prayers for your remaining mare to fully recover.
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brian anderton
Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 8
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 9:32 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well here we are 13 days after this all began. The open mare is up, fairly perky, drinking and had passed at least 6-7 piles of soft feces during the night. For that we are gratful. My instinct tells me to give her some B-12 And B complex shots for a couple of days. Maybe some Malox for stomach irritation from all the tubing. Probiotics to get evrything back in order that all the mineral oil just setting their for 11 days may have caused. This mare looks very depleted and weak but she is drinking and nibbling some grass so I think she may make it now. As for what caused it, My opinion is this, I feed rolls of tifton 44 bermuda hay and it is the best quality in this area. Fine stuff. Pure. High dollar. I set it out free choice. One day I supplement it as well by feeding a pelleted feed mixed with corn so they will chew it up and not as likely to choke. The next day I feed pure Alfalafa hay. All this while they have free access to the bermuda rolls. Loose trace mineral salt in a mineral feeder by the pond. 3 days before theses events started was when I would have been due to set out rolls as we have been letting them clean up what we put out before we set the next ones out due to the drought and shortage. BUT and here is where I believe this started, I worked 16 hours at work that day and when I got home it was Bitterly cold and they still had a little left so I stupidly made the decision to wait till the next day. Now understand there is some green grass beginning to put up and we are not starving them as we raise colts to sell so we are going to do the best to feed the mama's to the best of our ability. When I set out rolls the next day with feed just prior to that, They had really cleaned up what was left. I believe they ate the feed and then ran over to the rolls and pigged out on the new rolls and this caused the impaction. Lesson learned, Don't make them clean up hay if feeding rolls. If it gets very low, set some more out. For us instead of setting 4 rolls out every 6 days we will be setting 4 out every 5 days. Next year we plan on trying to find a good mixed grass hay. We put up some fine crabgrass hay for the ones in the barn and they eat it better than alfalfa. Another lesson learned for me and my local vet is if you have an impaction colic, treat with fluids via nasal tube till it passes and don't give up. The past 13 days has seemed like forever. Last and most importantly, Cast ALL your cares on HIM, For HE cares for you. Thanks everyone , Brian Anderton.
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Lilo
Member
Username: lilo

Post Number: 744
Registered: 4-2000
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 9:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sorry to hear you lost the older mare and colt. Best wishes for complete recovery of the other mare,
Lilo
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Ann
Member
Username: dres

Post Number: 1726
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 10:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian, thank you for your updates .. you have educated a few of us here .. I am sorry for your loss and happy that things are turning for the other mare..
Your instincts sound correct to me.. might give that mare some TLC to while you are at it..

Good luck .. you are very right .. keep the faith..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1630
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 12:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts on what might have caused the colics. Since reading this thread, I've changed how I feed. I don't just put a bale out a.m. and p.m. and call it good. And the small amount of grain w/supplements, I am trying to be more consistant on the timing of that also. So now my horses get hay in the morning, after noon with the grain/sups, and again at night. I am feeding less, but I think it's a lot healthier for their digestive systems as well as helping with the boredom. Maybe now they won't eat fence posts and escape on me!

Give yourself and wife a much needed break now!! Maybe supper out, and a good up lifting movie tonight, followed by a candle light soak or hot tub with a glass of wine!!! You all deserve it.
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Shirley Johnson
Member
Username: shirl

Post Number: 582
Registered: 2-2002
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 2:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian and Family,
My Condolences along with everyone else's. You've been through a real ordeal and I'm so sorry you lost the mare. Your caring and doing what you thought best is admirable and I certainly have learned a lot from your experience and thanks for sharing.
Now get some rest. Prayers are going up for you.
Shirl
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Debra Dove
Member
Username: 5691

Post Number: 38
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, Mar 6, 2008 - 11:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Brian,

I also extend my condolences to you and your family on the loss of your mare. I can't imagine going thru that with one horse, let alone two with one in foal... All of you (two and four footed) must be exhausted.

Peace, healing and comfort to all of you.

Debra
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Tonya
Member
Username: pbauer

Post Number: 416
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, Mar 7, 2008 - 1:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Brian,


The principal I should have followed: One can be honest about how one feels without being unkind.

I’m sorry for the way I treated you, it was wrong.


I pray that all will go well with the other mare~


Very Sincerely,
Tonya
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jos
Member
Username: paardex

Post Number: 576
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, Mar 7, 2008 - 4:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian, sorry for your loss and happy to hear the open mare seems to do well, I will keep my fingers crossed.
Also thank you for writing down what you think has happened it was enlightening and may help someone else not to make the same mistake. I applaud the way you hung in and kept trying.
Jos
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Fran C
Member
Username: canter

Post Number: 1413
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Friday, Mar 7, 2008 - 7:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Brian, adding my condolences for the loss of your mare and foal...and so glad the other mare seems to be turning the corner. Keeping my fingers crossed for her complete recovery.
Fran
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brian anderton
Member
Username: walkingd

Post Number: 14
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Monday, Jun 2, 2008 - 4:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just a quick update, the mare that lived has made a complete recovery. Not overnight but slowly but surely everyday kept looking better. She is now about 45 days in foal and everything looks fine. Thanks to all who helped. Brian Anderton.
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LL
Member
Username: frances

Post Number: 637
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Monday, Jun 2, 2008 - 7:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

That is wonderful news Brian!
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 2198
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Monday, Jun 2, 2008 - 7:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Great news Brian, hope she has a lovely foal for you
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Melissa Baker
Member
Username: mysi

Post Number: 240
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, Jun 2, 2008 - 7:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thats great news! Thanks for the update!
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