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Discussion on LAME GELDING AFTER ROUND PEN WORK

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GAYLE HOWARD
New Member
Username: doc61

Post Number: 1
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 - 1:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I HAVE A 14 YR OLD GELDING AND HAD HIM IN THE ROUND PEN ON SUNDAY EVENING. HE HAS NOT BEEN IN THE ROUND PEN FOR A COUPLE YEARS AND i WAS TRYING TO GET HIM BACK IN SHAPE. HE WAS JUST STARTING TO CANTER AND FOR SOME REASON HE PUT ON THE BRAKES AND STOPPED SHORT AFTER THAT I GOT BEHIND HIM AND STARTED HIM AGAIN I NOTICED HIM LIMPING SO I STOPPED IMMEDIATELY. I PUT HIM UP AND NOW HE IS NOT EVEN ABLE TO PUT WEIGHT ON HIS FRONT FOOT. IT REALLY DOESN'T LOOK LIKE IT IS SWELLING IN ANY OF THE JOINTS. I DID NOTICE A PIECE OF THE HOOF ABOUT 3/4 INCHES BY 1/2 INCH BROKEN OFF COULD THIS CAUSE HIM SO MUCH PAIN HE CAN HARDLY WALK DO I NEED TO GET A VET OUT RIGHT AWAY? I HAVE HIM IN A STALL AND I AM GIVING HIM BUTE FOR PAIN. I JUST DON;T KNOW IF HE NEEDS A VET OR IS IT OK TO WAIT A COUPLE DAYS AND SEE IF HE GETS BETTER ON HIS OWN.
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Lee
Member
Username: paul303

Post Number: 1112
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 - 11:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

First step is to read "Localizing Lameness in the Horse", and any other of Dr.O's articles that apply. If a light bulb doesn't go on, then it's probably best to get your vet out. Sometimes, the sooner you get your vet, the better the outcome, and the less time and money of your own is wasted.

Couple questions: Is he shod or unshod? What kind of work has he been doing since his last work in the round pen?

With pain this severe, it's always possible that there is an abscess, and the sooner it is treated, the better the horse will feel. But the best thing is to read the articles on lameness here, they are excellent, and if nothing becomes apparent, call your vet.
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Linda H. Schilkowsky, DVM
Member
Username: lindas

Post Number: 21
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 10, 2008 - 11:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

So he was normal one minute and seriously lame the next? If you don't see anything obvious and easy to take care of, like a big rock in the foot or something, I would get the vet out right away. If he is not markedly better in the morning pick up the phone and call!
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20822
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 - 7:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

WelcoMe Gayle,
I agree with DrS above, you should consider rapid onset lameness to the point of non-weight bearing a potentially serious problem needing a veterinary's attention. From your description I don't believe the hoof wall defect likely to be the cause of the problem.
DrO
PS: It is considered "shouting" when you write in all caps. On top of that it is a bit harder to read. You will get more responses using proper capitalization and punctuation when you post.
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GAYLE HOWARD
New Member
Username: doc61

Post Number: 2
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 - 7:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sorry about the all caps thing I am at work and my computer is usually always on caps lock. I just recently moved and do not have an established vet I did call one last night and they didn't want to come out because I was not an established customer. I am going to try to call another one today and see If I can get him out. It was weird because the day he did it he limped right after it happened but then a little while later while he was still limping he was walking around and did not want to stay in the barn to the point I finally let him out because I was afraid he was going to go into heat exhaustion because he was dripping wet with sweat from pacing and pawing in the stall. That was on Sunday on Monday he was out in the field all day still walking gingerly. But on Tuesday he was not bearing any weight on his foot except to take a step and it was right back up. I put him back in the stall and brought my mare in too so he would calm down and that seemed to help. I still do not see any swelling. I have rubbed up and down his leg and picked up his foot bent his knee and ankle and he doesn't act like he is in pain. So I am at a loss, as what to think. He has been a yard ornament for the past few years as I was hurt on one of my other horses and just had not had the nerve to get back in the saddle again. I finally decided it was time to try again and this happened..... So now I am quite discouraged. I thought about putting boots on him to see if this relieved any of his pain but I guess it would be better to just find me a vet I just wish I was back at the old house because my old vet would have already been there. If you have any other ideas on what it could to to keep him comfortable until I can get a vet to him It would be very much appreciated. Thank you!
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GAYLE HOWARD
New Member
Username: doc61

Post Number: 3
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 - 12:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lee,

I forgot to answer your question he is unshod. I had the farrier out on the 26th of May for a trim, I just haven't been putting shoes on them since I wasn't riding them. As for what type of work he was doing before... Nothing he was a yard ornament. I bought him from a horse trader and he was skin and bones when I got him I could see every bone in his body. his spirit was broken and walked around the pasture with his head down I had to move him away from my other geldings because they were beating him up, he is healthy now but I can tell he has been abused he spooks at everything. He is a sweet boy but has a whole lot of issues, Starting with respect I thought some work in the round pen would be good for him now I have hurt him. Thank you for your input I am really worried about him and I am trying to get a vet out ASAP!
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Elizabeth Kaufman
Member
Username: ekaufman

Post Number: 574
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 - 3:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Gayle,

I just needed to horn in to say, it's not at all clear that YOU hurt him. Sure he might not have shown you this lameness if you'd left him in the yard, but he may well have had a pre-existing problem that this incident has brought to light.

Horses are large animals that need to move. It is very hard to keep them bubble wrapped, even when we know they have some sort of fragility. So don't beat yourself up for giving him something to do, and wait for the vet to find out what hurts. Let's hope for a big icky stone bruise.
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Linda Schilkowsky, DVM
Member
Username: lindas

Post Number: 23
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 11, 2008 - 6:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Maybe you can find a veterinarian with a standing clinic that you can trailer to. These large animal guys are stretched to the limit, especially in the spring time. There are a couple around here who will only come out if the client is on a regular preventative care program. They will see you but you have to come to them during the hours they are in their clinic. It is an unfortunate reality when so many vets (like me!) take the small animal route for the easier lifestyle and the large animal sector goes extremely short handed. Most vets are good people who want to help but they just cannot work 24 hours a day or be in six places at once. A good way for a new person in town to be sure to get service when needed is to indicate when you call that you intend to use them for your preventative care, and would like to set up an appointment to float teeth, vaccinate, whatever.... that way you will have their ear when you have an injury, a colic, or whatever. It will cost more at first but it is nice to have somebody who you know and trust already when there is a real emergency.
Good luck with your guy...and don't blame yourself, it could have happened if he was just galloping around in the pasture and stepped wrong.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20833
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Jun 12, 2008 - 6:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Gayle, until you get a veterinarian out consider the advice in Diseases of Horses » Lameness » First Aid for the Lame Horse for keeping him as comfortable as possible.
DrO
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GAYLE HOWARD
New Member
Username: doc61

Post Number: 4
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Thursday, Jun 12, 2008 - 10:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you all for the kind words I do feel a little better about what happened I just hate thinking that i caused his pain. When I got home last night I took him out of the stall soaked his hoof just in case it may be an abscess coming up and then I took a baby diaper (since I didn't have a boot) and taped it on his hoof. He seemed to try to use it a little more with that on but he is still in a lot of pain. I did notice this morning that his knee is a little swollen not much just slightly so I put some DSMO on it before coming to work. I did finally get a hold of a vet that will send someone out but the Dr. that they want to send out is on Vacation until Monday (UGH) but they assured me that I was doing all I could and I was not endangering his health by waiting the extra days. I am going to call my farrier today and have him come out tonight and see if he can look at his hoof and see what he thinks. I will continue to give him bute and keep him quite as possible until the vet can get there. Once again Thank you for all the info and words of encouragement. All I want is for him to be ok and out of pain. I am so glad I found this site as it has so many informative articles and the people on here are very nice and helpful. I will let you all know what I find out from the Farrier and the Vet and keep you posted on Doc's condition.
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