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Discussion on Increased digital pulse in rt front only

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Kerrie
New Member
Username: kerrief

Post Number: 4
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 - 9:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello,
Are there any other problems beside abscesses and laminitis that causes an increase in digital pulse, in one leg?

Hoof test neg, hoof not warm or hot. Positive on flexion.

Any input is greatly appreciated.
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 4027
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 - 10:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kerrie anyone on this board that knows me, knows I am a digital pulse freak. My horse has foundered before so I monitor them daily.

I can say he gets DP's quite often, sometimes in just one leg. Dr.O. has finally convinced me that sometimes they do get them for no reason. If his are really THUMPING something is usually brewing.

I also have noticed when it gets warmer out they seem to elevate a little in all my horses

Do you suspect he has something wrong? Why are you checking his DP?
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 22859
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Apr 27, 2009 - 8:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Kerrie,
Well not for "no reason" but sometimes for normal physiological reasons that are not readily apparent. We think the blood flow to the feet is under very fine control to maintain proper temperature. So if the horse is standing with one foot in the sun and one in the shade the two feet may have very different blood flow dynamics.
DrO
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Kerrie
New Member
Username: kerrief

Post Number: 5
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Monday, Apr 27, 2009 - 2:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My mare was dx with pedal ostitis Nov 08 (bone scan); and suspensory strain all 8 branches, as well as, hind PDS. We recently changed her Epona shoes to aluminum natural balance. She was and still is sore footed since we did the change (4 weeks ago). My vet came out yesterday, because, like you Diane...I too, am a DP freak! She was lame on the rt at the walk and sore footed on both, so I took her pulse which was slightly elevated. Vet felt we had a abscess brewing and pulled shoes (this is the 3rd time we've done this in 2 years with no resulting abscess!). Horse has rock hard feet, no obvious bruising or abscess noted when we took off shoe.

So, you can see why I am wondering if a elevated DP could mean something other than laminitis and abcesses, as neither fit her symptoms. Which by the way, when you get her moving she does work out of lameness a little.

She has been quite an enigma for my vet, as she has multiple issues.

Any input is greatly appreciated!
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 4030
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Monday, Apr 27, 2009 - 5:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Boy Kerrie, your horse has a lot going on...From your history it sounds like the new shoeing change doesn't "agree with her"

Which foot has the PO? Have you tried any kind of pour in pad... Though Hanks problem isn't the same as your mares, the wide web shoe(routed out to relieve sole pressure) with the pour in pad was the only thing that made him comfortable and protect his CB

Quite a few people on this board use it for varying purposes and have had good results.

I have read, that if the natural balance shoe isn't applied properly it can make matters worse. Is your farrier well versed in NB trimming and the application of NB shoes?

IF(wish I knew how to underline IF) your horse is a little sore from the trimming and shoeing it can bring on a DP...IME anyway.

If you suspect her hooves, maybe trying some very soft ground or boots with pads, and a little bute would help.
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Kerrie
Member
Username: kerrief

Post Number: 6
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Monday, Apr 27, 2009 - 11:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Diane,
She has PO in both front feet, specifically the wings of the coffin bone lite up on the bone scan.

Yes, I agree about the Natural Balance shoes and it is not my first choice for her.

The pour in pad you spoke of; it is silicone? I have heard Equithane is a good choice. What style of aluminum shoe worked for your boy?

In reference to bute- at this point the vet does not want her taking it, as she wants to treat this immediate crisis as an abscess. My mare has done this before and it was not an abscess then, and I really don't think it is now.

Tonight I went out to see her and she is not as sore footed and seems more comfortable barefoot. Perhaps she didn't like the shoes or pads? I am concerned about leaving her barefoot though, as we need to protect her sole.

Thanks again for your comments!
Kerrie
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 4036
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 28, 2009 - 7:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes Kerrie it is the equithane I use. I personally like the equipakCS as it keeps thrush away too.

Hank doesn't wear aluminum just a regular wide web shoe routed out to relieve sole pressure. I believe they are called extra EZ's.

The pour in pads have to be applied right too. If applied to thickly it can cause sole pressure too. Though it is pretty easy as long as it is kept within the rim of the shoe it's usually fine.

My farrier had never used it, and got it right the first time The relief for Hank was immediate.

Sounds like your horse may have been made a little sore from the shoeing, especially since she had been sore since she was shod.

Glad she's feeling better.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 22864
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 28, 2009 - 8:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

To address your primary concern, no I would not use changes in the DP alone as a way to diagnose the existence of a foot problem. There are too many cases where it is not a significant finding.

To read more about pedal osteitis see, Diseases of Horses » Lameness » Diseases of the Hoof » Pedal Osteitis.
DrO
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Lee
Member
Username: paul303

Post Number: 1267
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Apr 29, 2009 - 1:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've been using the equithane for a few years now. It started when a new mare of mine that had very flat soles became quite sore. I experimented by having her step on a piece of styrofoam, and then cutting it out to fit her hoof. I applied it with vet wrap and covered it with duct tape, and then ( after she freaked, and did backflips and handsprings over her "weird feet" )lunged her. She lunged sound. When I took it off, she was immediately sore. I then asked my farrier for equithane and got the same results as the styrofoam. I've used it ever since, and also use it on my navicular mare. Both horses get incredible relief and their soles have remained wonderfully healthy. At times, over the past few years, either my farrier has run short on equithane, or I decided to leave their soles open to the air, for one shoeing. I've found that when I skip the equithane, both the horses get sore.

I also find that the feet of both horses maintain a good moisture balance and cleanliness. No problems with thrush or sole bruises. And, boy, there is nothing like it in winter to avoid snowballs in the feet.

You might possibly consider beginning to roll those front toes a little and adding a silicon fill in product. Especially if you try the styrofoam "tape on" experiment and see some relief.
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Kerrie
Member
Username: kerrief

Post Number: 7
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Thursday, Apr 30, 2009 - 12:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello all,

It's been 4 days since the vet pulled her rt shoe, and she still is comfortable barefoot! My current farrier (and new to us), clenches nails a bit differently. Instead of clinching the small bit of nail, he counter sinks it. I'm wondering if that was what made her sore?

I wanted to share an observation with you all to check if my logic is sound (ha ha...pardon the pun! ).

When walking and trotting in straight lines,she does pretty well. When lounging on hard and soft surfaces, to the right only, there is a definite head nod. When leading her and turning to the left around me, she is sore; but not turning to the right at all.

I'm thinking the soreness was a result of the shoeing; and the lameness exhibited lounging to the right and turning left (in hand), are the result of her issues with the branches of her suspensories of the right leg.

If this is true, then what would be the best course of action?

Thank you all again!
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Kerrie
Member
Username: kerrief

Post Number: 8
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Thursday, Apr 30, 2009 - 12:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Lee,

Thank you sharing your experiences as well. I plan on talking to my vet about using Equithane or Equipak CS.

On your navicular horse, are you using Natural Balance shoes?

Thank you! This forum has been very helpful!
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Diane E.
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 4053
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Thursday, Apr 30, 2009 - 8:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kerrie it's hard to say really, I have theories on my horses sometimes and I'm about 50/50 as far as guessing Tho I would have sworn I was right at the time!. If you are lucky enough to have a good vet see what they have to say.

If not addressing her hooves would be a good place to start, when their hooves hurt, or are poorly trimmed/shod it can make other "lameness issues" worse
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