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Discussion on Aquired flexural deformity in 4month foal

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Jo Wightman
Member
Username: lexi

Post Number: 79
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Nov 4, 2009 - 5:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi I have a 4month old colt who is very lame on his left hind - it stays bent at the hock and he walks on the toe and rests the toe on the ground. It has no heat or swelling anywhere but it will not straighten out at the pastern/fetlock. I have restricted him to a small pen and as he is not yet weaned cut his mums feed right back and they are just having good quality hay and vitamins and limestone flour. As they were on a clover rich pasture I suspect flexural limb deformity but is flexural limb deformity likely in just one limb? And how soon should I expect to see an improvement if this is the case? Thank you.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 24038
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Nov 5, 2009 - 7:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Jo,
I can't quite put my finger on it but your description does not sound like a typical acquired flexural deformity. There is the unilateral quality, very lame, and the hock position does not sound right. Let's be sure we have the diagnosis right. Did a veterinarian examine the foal?

Would it be possible to see images of this foal while bearing weight on the leg? How long did it take for the condition to develop? And which came first the contracture or the lameness?
DrO
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Jo Wightman
Member
Username: lexi

Post Number: 80
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Thursday, Nov 5, 2009 - 4:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks i will try and get a photo. No a vet has not been out yet as I do not have the foal insured so was trying the rest in small corral first. This foal has been lame on and off on different legs over the past 2 or 3 months in varying degrees, it gets better then worse then clears up then appears in a different leg! I put it down to his tearing around like a mad thing!This time round he has been lame for about 7-10 days but got a lot worse 2 days ago. I wondered if this could be due to me strip grazing them so they get lush grass for say 2 hours a day until its eaten down. After rest for 2 days and hay diet with no hard feed the foal seems a lot better, he is not lying down as much and will bear weight on it. The hock straightens out again when he walks and he is even putting the heel to the floor now and though the pasterns looks upright it is not tipping over the toe so you may be right perhaps I jumped to a hasty conclusion. He is mobile again and playful and there is still no heat or swelling.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 24047
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Nov 6, 2009 - 7:32 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

If I have this pictured right Jo (the chronic intermittent lameness, the severity of the lameness, the quick onset and turnaround) the history is not as consistent for flexor contracture as it is for severe lameness who's pain was exacerbated by putting the heel down.

I hope you can get some help with this so a proper diagnosis and treatment can be instituted. Be sure to check that sole for abscess or a nail.
DrO
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