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Discussion on What is your definition of pasture sound?

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LynnL
Member
Username: lynnland

Post Number: 180
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Thursday, Mar 31, 2011 - 10:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Gang,

Just doing some thinking about my young horse that we recently had an MRI on and was given a poor prognosis.

I always thought of a horse as pasture sound if he was sound at the walk and sound for the occasional trot about (on his own) and would not be in pain after a short canter if he got a bit silly with his pasture mates. I also guess that it might be dependent upon the behaviour of his pasture mates.

Any thoughts?
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 6327
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Mar 31, 2011 - 10:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

We have a mare, Libby Rose, who I consider pasture sound although she is often lame with changes in weather, etc. On her good days, I turn her out to wander around with her friends. If she's really feeling good, she will forget herself and buck a little and run a few yards, other wise she just enjoys the sun and company. IMO if the lameness isn't really hurting the quality of life, and pain can be managed, the horse is "pasture sound." This might be stretching it a bit, but the quality of life is what I go by.
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LynnL
Member
Username: lynnland

Post Number: 181
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Thursday, Mar 31, 2011 - 11:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Sara,

For some reason I also tend to feel different when I see an old versus young horse limping about. An old horse dozing in the sun and walking slowly, but still very alert, makes me feel very good but seeing the exact same thing in a young horse tends to make me feel sad and ask some serious questions.

Lynn
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: mrose

Post Number: 6328
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Mar 31, 2011 - 1:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It's good to ask questions; but ask if the horse is happy and enjoying life, not how it makes you feel to watch it. Given the choice, I think most horses would rather be limping around a field than dead (assuming they aren't in a lot of pain.) If a horse can socialize some, is eating and drinking, has a good look to it's eye, doesn't seem dull from pain or illness, than imo it's not ready to be euthanized. I don't believe a horse should have to live all coopped up in a stall 24/7, drugged up so much to control pain that it is stupified, or be kept alive only for the emotional needs of the owner. That isn't the way a horse was meant to live (or anything else imo!) However, if it is still enjoying life then it doesn't bother me to see it limping around in the pasture. Sometimes the movement helps them physically, and it always helps them mentally imo. Of course, I am lucky because I have a lot of pasture. I realize in some areas pasture board can be pretty expensive, and I'm realistic enough to realize money often plays into decissions people have to make. I'm just giving you my opinion.
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LynnL
Member
Username: lynnland

Post Number: 182
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Thursday, Mar 31, 2011 - 2:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Good point Sara! Thanks for the reminder that it is about the beastie, not me.
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Lee
Member
Username: paul303

Post Number: 1507
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Apr 2, 2011 - 1:23 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

As long as their eyes are bright, and they partake in the herd dynamics I'll let them be. My eldest now, will be 31 on May 2. I take her (on a lead), and my dog for walks through the woods. She's medicated for Cushings and arthritis ( previcox )daily. I have the property and the means to keep her comfortable. If I didn't, I wouldn't hesitate to.... She's been fairly severe navicular since the late eighties when we had to retire her from showing, but with intensive care of her shoeing and feet, she's always been fairly sound - trail wise. The education she has given me about navicular ( she's an old King ranch mare - bulldog type ), has been incredible.

My attitude? If you have the luxury of being able to keep them as "pets", the things you can learn from them are unbelieveable. My old mare has had lameness problems since 1985, but you know what?? I've had rotten arthritis problems since then too. Over the years, I've watched my farrier employ the latest methods on my mare. My vet and my farrier have said that they have learned so much from my mare....I have too.

Only you, can decide your horse's future. Some horses are better off - not going on. It all depends on the circumstances and the horse's attitude.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 25646
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Apr 3, 2011 - 10:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

To be able to stand, walk, and obtain adequate food and water in reasonable comfort so as to maintain condition would be a fair definition of pasture sound.
DrO
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