Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Tripping behind

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Susanne
Member
Username: scrupi1

Post Number: 76
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 12, 2011 - 9:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello,
I purchased a 4 year old underweight TB gelding about 2 months ago, he has steadily been gaining weight on our feeding regime and is starting to gain muscle but at 17 hands is all legs and still a bit on the uncoordinated side. He was progressing as expected in work until we decided to put back shoes on. Ever since being shod he has been catching his hind toes behind resulting in his hind legs kind of collapsing under him. This mostly occurs at the trot and happens several times each ride. He doesn't feel lame at all or any different in any other way. Our farrier has been working with us for several years and we have not had any problems before. This TB does tend to swing his feet close to the ground as a rule, with the added weight of the shoes is he now just having a harder time clearing the back feet effectively or should I be worried about some other issue? It has not quite yet been a week since he has been shod. Thank you!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Z
Member
Username: vickiann

Post Number: 2514
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 12, 2011 - 10:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

With all due respect to your farrier, to me it sounds like a foot problem due to the work that he did.

How else can you explain that the horse was going well until the farrier put the shoes on?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Z
Member
Username: vickiann

Post Number: 2515
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Oct 12, 2011 - 10:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

In my experience, again and again, tripping has most often been solved by competent farrier work.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 25998
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Oct 15, 2011 - 10:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Susanne,
Your history certainly suggests that putting shoes on the back has caused problems but the part that makes me wonder is your prior statement he seems a bit uncoordinated. This sounds like this was before being shod. Has the horse been examined for lameness or ataxia issues?

If the horse is only having problems with the shoes on, reviewing how the horse is trimmed and shod certainly should be done.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Suzanne Reed
New Member
Username: simplysu

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2011
Posted on Monday, Oct 17, 2011 - 11:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Susanne,

Besides a possible shoeing issue, another possibility would be the horse's fitness.

If your horse was not fit, was undernourished for a long time, or never allowed to run and romp as a baby to achieve proper development, then he may need to be worked up slowly to build his back, hind end, and leg strength. You didn't say what discipline you ride or how long your rides are, but you could be asking too much, too early. If reducing his work load doesn't help, an exam for lameness, ataxia, Wobblers may be in order.

Good Luck with him. I just love TBs. Suzanne
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC