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Discussion on Coggins Test: What is cost, essential?

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dee
Posted on Saturday, Apr 3, 1999 - 7:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

How much do Coggins tests cost, and do you think it a good idea to have this done?
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Amanda
Posted on Saturday, Apr 3, 1999 - 7:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

In NY it cost me $30.00 a horse. It obviously varies throughout the country. ask your vet.

We are never going to stamp out this disease if horse owners don't step up and get their horses tested!
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Vera
Posted on Saturday, Apr 3, 1999 - 7:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I suppose that it should cost $18 but as i don't live in the Us i do not know. However i believe that you should do a Coggins test every year. You must be sure whether our horse has this, and if it does you must protect the other horses from contracting it. Here in Greece we do such a test every year and we must have proff that it is negative before being able to compete in any equestrian competitions( apart from race track which does not belong to the same federation and i don't know anything about) I am also aware that they also do this test in Europe as well and no horse can take part in competititions or travel to another country without proff that the test was negative.
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Amy
Posted on Saturday, Apr 3, 1999 - 8:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It costs me about $18 to have a Coggins test run... but I only have them on horses that are
for sale, ones I buy or ones that are going off to show/ breed.
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The Advisor Vet, RN Oglesby DVM
Posted on Saturday, Apr 3, 1999 - 8:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

In my area the incidence of new cases is nonexistant. We do get the rare reactor that has been brought into the area. Because of our local situation I tell my clients that if they are not going to places that require proof, once every 3 years is fine. However, they should always insist on a negative coggins not more than a year old when new horses are brought on to the farm because of purchasing, selling, boarding, or just visiting. I also advise you do not take your horse that does not require a recent Coggins test.

Negative horses are not going to become positive unless exposed to infected horses. So as to how often you need a test will depend on how often you need to prove to other people your horse is not infected and your risk of exposure which will differ consideraby from year to year.
The Advisor Vet, RN Oglesby DVM
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Claudette C. Dumont
Posted on Thursday, Aug 12, 1999 - 5:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi everyone,

Dr Oglesby, I read that Coggins disease is carried by flies. I guess the flies have to come in contact with an infected horse to carry the disease but I'm wondering how far do we have to keep from an infected horse? Also, I would like to know what are the symptoms of a horse having caught that disease?

Thank you keep up the good work!
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The Advisor Vet, RN Oglesby DVM
Posted on Friday, Aug 13, 1999 - 6:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Not just flies but they must be biting flies. I believe 300 yards is officially recommended. I would like a good half mile.

Clinical signs vary from horse to horse and 3 forms of the disease are described:
Acute vs Chronic Disease
Acutely: fever, depression, and cardiovascular shock would be anticipated with about a 40% mortality rate during the acute phase. Those that live through the acute form go on to develop the chronic form, about 30% of those infected, waste away over a year or two.
The Inapparent Carrier
About 30% of those infected recover to become inapparent carriers of this disease. These horses have no clinical signs but during times of decreased resistance develop viremia and become contagious.
DrO
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