Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on MSM supplement for contracted knees in foals

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

sharon wilson
Posted on Friday, Apr 7, 2000 - 3:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

We would like to know if you have had any luck or are familiar with the use of MSM to help foals with contracted tendons after tetracycline has not seemed to fix the problem. We have three foals (all with the same sire) who have had tetracycline after birth because of contracted knees. They had straightened out for a while, but after exercise, they come in very shaky and bending at the knees. One has been restricted to a small paddock and only out for an hour, and the other has only been in a large foaling stall since his birth (one week ago). They buck and play, but are very shaky after they get tired. Any suggestions?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Saturday, Apr 8, 2000 - 8:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am afraid the tetracycline is just a temporary affect: the calcium binding action causes the flexor muscles to relax, but the affect is temporary. We think it is useful in some cases but where it works I wonder if they would not have relaxed on their own. Their is no rational for the use of MSM. How old and what breed are your foals? Is it just the kness that are buckling or are the feet upright also?
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

sharon wilson
Posted on Monday, Apr 10, 2000 - 10:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The foals are all Thoroughbreds of different ages. One was born 2-23, one 3-16, and one 3-31. They are all by a large-boned 16.2 hand stallion who's foals generally mature late (as 3 or 4 year-olds).
Usually only the knees are weak and buckle, not the ankles or feet.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Monday, Apr 10, 2000 - 12:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Sharon,
I think you need to talk with your veterinarian about slowing down the growth of these foals. Though it appears that just the flexors to the carpus are affected this has worked well for me with digital flexor contracture. I need to put these experiences in the article. If we cannot correct it this way there are surgical options whose efficacy is not well explored.

You may be able to accomplish this through decreasing the feed to the mares but this works best by weaning the foals early. I suspect they are growing quickly. Where they this way at birth and how has it changed?
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

sharon wilson
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 11, 2000 - 2:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

All of these foals (who are all colts) were contracted at birth, improved slightly after tetracycline and limited amounts of exercise, but when allowed to be out in a large field for 6 hours, they come back in shaky and buckling at the knees. They are all way too young to be weaned- the oldest is only 6 weeks old- so we need to find a way to manage them while they are with their mother, hopefully without confining them to a stall. It this something that they will probably grow out of and not to worry about so much, or are we right to restrict their exercise?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 11, 2000 - 5:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

No Sharon they are not too young and foals have been sucessfully weaned as early as 2 weeks. Though they grow slower the first year they have caught up with their later weaned age groups by 2 years of age. Weaning this early is certainly not desirable but the most effective way I know to correct the problem. So don't count out the possibility.

It is difficult to predict whether this will improve or worsen overtime. I have seen both occur with the digital flexors, so watch for a pattern or improving or worsening. If the exercise noticably worsens the conditon I would say yes, restrict their exercise but not to a stall but a medium paddock. I think it is important to understand that there is very little work on this particular form of contracture so recommendations are drawn from digital flexor contracture.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joan M. Rogers
Posted on Tuesday, May 2, 2000 - 2:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just reading this discussion about contracted tendons--I had a filly last year with this problem. Same description as Sharon's. Our vet finally cut the check ligaments and put the filly in tight casts. Today, as a yearling, there is some scarring from the casts, and the filly is not as developed as our other yearlings, but she's running in the pasture with them, the knees are flat, and she may yet have a racing career.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Terry Moe (Winky)
Posted on Friday, Jul 28, 2000 - 3:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O

I have just read all of the above discussions, as you will remember we have talked about this foal of mine, born July 1, 2000 , orphaned and then diagnosed with hypothyroidism dysmaturity sydrome. The goiters have resolved he is growing, but after reading above I question, is he growing too fast? My foal also had IV oxytetracycline therapy, and I am finding the same problem as above. The foals front legs look great but after too much exercise (this even being confined to a small 10x10 outside paddock) his legs look tired, shaky and weak at the knees. When I observe this I immediately confine his to a smaller space and support wrap his legs. These wraps stay on only about 12-16 hours and when removed the legs look great. I'm up to about 48 hours with no support wraps or splinting if I confine him and decrease his exercise. He sounds so familiar to the above posting by Sharon. This foal is 28 day old. Should I be cutting back his caloric intake, he gained 17 kgs in the first 12 days and although he hasn't been weighed since , he is very obviously growing. I am feeding him foal milk replacement and he takes in approx 9 -10 litres a day with another 2-4 litres of H2O. I am afraid to let him out in a larger paddock due to the incomplete ossification of his hock joints (these appear resolved , no swelling, tenderness etc) . Part of me thinks he needs more exercise but I'm afraid I'll undo all that I have accomplished to date.

Ps , Do you think sharon's foals could be afflicted with the same problem as my foal? (ie: hypothyroidism. Maybe the stud is not to blame)

Thanks

Terry Moe
Emerald Appaloosas
Horsefly, B.C.
Canada
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Monday, Jul 31, 2000 - 11:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Terry,
Concerning Sharon's foals: probably not, this is a common disorder with many causes.

Concerning your foal cut and paste this in the original discussion so we can keep all the facts together.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Terry Moe (Winky)
Posted on Monday, Jul 31, 2000 - 12:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O

I'm not sure how to cut and paste this as you advised. Did you want it moved to all the discussions we've had under hypothyroidism.?

Sorry for the trouble.

Terry Moe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 1, 2000 - 12:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I moved it Terry
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Julie C. Walstrom (April)
Posted on Sunday, Aug 13, 2000 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a 5-wk. old foal that is buckling at the left front knee. One vet said it is too late for the tetratcycline shot and also said that creeper feed I found may aggravate the condition (I came across a feed for young foals that was high in calcium and said it would help prevent orthopedic problems in foals). Another vet said I should feed the foal the feed. I am now confused as to what I should do. Please shed some light on this situation!
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 1997 - 2016
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC