Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Scratches Treatment Recipe

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tami Attard
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 25, 2000 - 10:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O,

A recent article in Horse Sport magazine featured a topical treatment for scratches that consisted of DMSO, nitrofurazone, and one of the following - fenbendazole, oxybendazole, ofendizole, mebendazole, or thiabendazole. The 3 ingredients should be mixed in a 1:1:1 ratio and applied generously twice a day after the affected area has been washed with warm water and an antibacterial soap. Can you please explain to me what each of these ingredients is? Do I need to get the ingredients from my vet? Also, how is this treatment different than the Panolog cream (or is it ointment) that you recommend?

The most recent treatment I've tried is triple antibiotic Polysporin applied after washing with an antifungal shampoo. We've been using this for 1 month now and although the 3 stubborn crusty sores are not getting any worse, they're also not going away. Although no lameness is evident, my horse does stuck up occassionaly. Recent blood work was done (CBC). The vet recommended Nutriquin to supplement his feed and boost his system, but we continue to battle the sores. My horse is turned out to pasture only when it is dry and is turned out in the arena otherwise. His stall is thoroughly cleaned daily.

I'd like your opinion on the effectiveness of the above mixture before I try it. Or should I just try Panalog?

Thanks for your help,
Tami
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 25, 2000 - 4:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The above ingredients contain a sovlent, a antibacterial and a anthelminic (dewormer). I am unsure as to how well this would work. I recommend you try the panalog creme, it contains better antimicrobials and stronger antiinflammatories.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Pamela2
Posted on Thursday, Apr 27, 2000 - 2:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Tami:
Sorry to hear you have scratches too. I have been fighting the problem for a couple of months with one of my horses ( he also had swelling and lameness).
We washed the affected areas with an antibacterial/antifungal soap, left it on for l0 minutes, then rinsed it off. For the first couple of weeks we wrapped the leg after applying sulpha urea (an antibacterial cream). After that we switched to Conofite Cream (for ringworm) mixed with Polysporin Triple on a gauze pad and wrapped it, stopped washing, and changed it every other day. This treatment was on our vet's advice. My understanding is that scratches is a bacterial infection. My vet also suggested that a horse could build up a resistance to a product if you just use it continuously, ie, switching around after several days is not a bad idea.
Our final treatment was with green wound cream that we sent away for to a vet hospital in Alberta. It was recommended to us by a vet friend. She uses this cream herself. If Dr O will allow, I will mention the name of the clinic in an answer so you can try it.
I don't know just what treatment cleared up my problem. The wrapping seemed to be a breakthrough (gauze pads with creams over infected areas, quilted pads and polo wraps). It seemed like ages before we were making any headway with the scratches.
Keep your chin up. There is life after scratches, but as you can see from Dr O on my discussion page, it is just waiting out there to hit us again!
By the way, my paddocks are dry and the infected horse does not go out on pasture in winter (he runs and pulls his shoes). I have NO mud!
Pamela
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jordana Meisner
Posted on Thursday, Apr 27, 2000 - 5:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am the queen of scratches treatment! My 2yo has had it since August, and we are just maintaining a few spots now. What worked by far the best was Desitin! Actually, any generic with 40% zinc oxide, the cheaper the better, is what I use. I don't wash - why add moisture that you're trying to keep out? Of course, Rio's scratches never got infected, or made him lame (though I don't know why, his legs were one big scab). I just slathered desitin on twice a day, going through about 3/4 of a tube a day.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tami Attard
Posted on Tuesday, May 2, 2000 - 2:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for your input on my ongoing scratches problem. I've most recently tried Hibitane (which is apparently used to treat mastitis on cows). We mix it with water and wash Blue's legs at least once per day, twice if possible. We make sure that his legs are completely dried off with clean towels. We've been using it for 5 days now and it seems to be helping. His legs are not as stocked up as usual and the 3 stubborn weepy spots that I've been battling for 2 months actually appear to be smaller. Hopefully the positive effect continues!!!!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce C. Kramer (Rhonda)
Posted on Monday, Oct 30, 2000 - 7:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

After a couple of months, much money for vet visits and antibiotics, much time scrubbing with a Betadine scrub, putting on medicines, etc., etc., etc., a friend told me about a product called Shapley's Original M-T-G. It worked like a miracle on my horse's scratches! She had a sore that just kept getting bigger and thicker and nastier, along with others on her legs. She never became lame, but her leg was swollen daily and the scab was very sore to touch and incredibly thick - nothing seemed to soften it/them. Again, this product worked like a miracle! In only two days time, 3/4 of the scab was gone and the skin was pink and healthy looking underneath and little white hairs were already starting to grow. The leg is no longer swollen either! Even the people at my barn were amazed at how quickly the M-T-G worked. The first day, I put the M-T-G directly on the scabs. The second day, I poured the M-T-G onto a cloth and gently wiped her legs, reapplying the M-T-G and removing the scabs. Again, the scabs just loosened up and would come off as I wiped over them. I was truly amazed, that I had tried so many different things, spent so much money, and watched my horse be uncomfortable and this product worked in a couple days time.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 31, 2000 - 7:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Bruce,
What are the ingredients of the M-T-G?
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce C. Kramer (Rhonda)
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 31, 2000 - 7:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello DrO--

Unfortunately I do not have a bottle with me. As I said I was using a friend's M-T-G and am waiting for mine to arrive. However, I looked up their website, which I believe is www.shapleys.com and learned that the company has been in business since the 1930s and the product was created by a barber to originally treat his customers' psoriasis and dandruff problems. He also loved horses and found that it worked on them as well.

Sorry I'm not more help at this time with the ingredients. Again though, I cannot emphasize enough how quickly this worked on my horse.

Have a good day!

Rhonda (Bruce)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rachel Dahl (Rachel2)
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 16, 2001 - 8:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I tried the MTG but unfortunately it had no effect. In fact, it set us back a bit because I stopped using Panalog during the 2-3 weeks of MTG. I noticed his skin looked very red and inflamed during this time and he was more "ouchy" to being treated. Then his leg swelled up to the hock so I reverted back to Panalog. However, with the cream being $20/tube and our using at least 1 a week since late September, I'm anxious to find a more effective cure. The scratches area looks like the rim of a circle. As I pick off the scabs (charming, I know) new hair eventually grows but the circle moves out so there's always a black scabby rim moving outwards. Should I be treating the freshly picked skin any differently? Should I wait until the scabs are practically falling off or force them a little?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jordana Meisner (Presario)
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 16, 2001 - 8:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Rachel - I had replied above regarding Desitin, but since then have found an even better solution: 4oz of Desitin (40% zinc oxide), 2oz of Neosporin, and 2oz of cortizone cream. Generic of each will do fine. Mix them all together, and apply liberally a couple of times a day. Each time just wipe off the old stuff and put on the new. After a few days you'll find some scabs starting to come off with the old stuff. I wouldn't go picking them off, as it can be quite painful. Panalog didn't do diddly for me, neither did Gentomicin, "dew poisoning ointment", and various other (expensive) remedies prescribed by my vet.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 17, 2001 - 9:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Jordana, you impune my favorite remedy?
Your mixture looks very good and should be helpful: it is very similar to Panalog creme. It contains antibiotics, corticosteroids, and a soothing emolient creme. Panalog has a little stronger antimicrobials and much stronger corticosteroids but the zinc oxide definately is the better emolient. It should be cheaper and maybe being able to put large amounts on is important in your case.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Diane Edmonds (Scooter)
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 16, 2001 - 10:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi, My horses with white socks got scratches last spring, I just went out and sprayed them with bluecoat every day or when the blue went away, it cleared up in a couple weeks. Made sense to me as bluecoat is an anti-fungal plus a drying agent. They looked kinda funny with blue socks, but it worked great and was easy.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jordana Meisner (Presario)
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 17, 2001 - 10:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O - "impune"? You make me laugh! :-) I just know the panalog did absolutely nothing except drain my wallet, and in very short order I had the scratches gone with the home brew. I know, however, that panalog has gotten rid of many a case!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tami Attard (Tattard)
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 17, 2001 - 11:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi everyone,
Last year I had an ongoing battle with scratches, and I finally won! What worked for me was to wash the area daily (or as often as I could) with a little Hibitane mixed with warm water and thoroughly dry with a clean cloth. As a preventative measure, I applied Keratex Mud Shield Powder, which is a waterproofing powder with some anti-bacterial property. This year, the Mud Shield Powder is sprinkled on my horse's back legs before he is turned out into the snow. So far his legs have been fine. If I see the slightest sign that the scratches might be returning, I wash the area with the Hibitane and warm water and dry it thoroughly. I've only had to do this once this year, so the Mud Shield Powder seems to be helping. For more information on Mud Shield Powder visit their web site at www.keratex.com (for ordering in the USA) or e-mail Kath or Mark at hobbyhse@island.net (for ordering in Canada). I hope this helps,
Tami
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dana Marotta (Patch)
Posted on Thursday, Jan 25, 2001 - 4:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am also dealing with "scratches" and being a novice horse owner had no clue as to what they were until last Saturday. I've been washing the area with a Betadine scrub and then applying Vaseline to the dry patches along with a product called Micro-Tek gel which is supposedly made for fungal infections. I haven't gotten the Panalog creme yet. Someone I know suggested Listerine! My horse has Cushings and I'm wondering if it is related to any liver malfunctions> Any clues?

P.S. What is Hibitane and where do I buy it!
Dana
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tami Attard (Tattard)
Posted on Friday, Jan 26, 2001 - 4:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Dana,

Hibitane can be purchased at a farm/livestock store. Here is Ontario we have a chain of such stores called the Co-op. Apparently, Hibitane is used to treat mastitis on cows.

The method that works best for me is to wash the sores and let the sudsy warm water soak on the area for 10 - 15 minutes. This allows the scabs to soften so that they can be gently scraped away with my fingernail. Be very gentle though because you don't want your horse to think that every time you wash his legs it's going to hurt. I then thoroughly dry the area with a clean cloth, and that's all. I don't use any cream or Vaseline because, from what I've read, the idea is to keep the area dry. The Keratex Mud Shield Powder also helped in keeping the area dry. Clipping the area also helped, maybe because moisture was not longer trapped by the hair on his legs (?) Who knows!

That said, a friend of mine is trying the Hibitane with limited success. She's recently started using the Mud Shield Powder, so we'll see how that goes.

I understand that the root of the problem is sometimes fungal and sometimes bacterial, so you may have to experiement a little. Patience and persistence pay off!

Good luck,
Tami
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rachel Dahl (Rachel2)
Posted on Sunday, Feb 11, 2001 - 8:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just wanted to post a follow up and say thanks to all of you who responded with "recipes". My horse's scratches are MUCH improved with plenty of new hair growth. I tried the formula of Panalog/Desitin/Neosporin/Cortisone/Furacin. The advantages I see are that it's broad spectrum covering both bacterial and fungal; you can put more on; it's cheaper in the long run; and it makes the leg look white, thereby covering the unsightly blemishes while healing. Some of the most resistant, deepest areas have healed over the course of about three weeks of 1xday treatment. The area right above the heel in back(which is exposed to the most dirt I suppose) is being most resistant, and new areas are trying to emerge, but I treat them immediately and so far they're not turning into anything. This has been an awful mud/snow season here in Massachusetts so if the treatment is working gradually under these conditions, I certainly recommend it. I'm also keeping the hair clipped short and bathing with betadine scrub before treating. Thanks everyone.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

3rsatsmf (3rsatsmf)
Posted on Friday, Feb 16, 2001 - 8:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The M-T-G Lotion is great for growing back hair... like when my little 4 year old gets too rambunctious with the "elder statesmen" of his herd and he comes in at night sans one patch of hair on his croup! You'll notice the hair growing back in a little less than a week.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Saturday, Feb 17, 2001 - 11:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello 3rsatmf,
I have tried to find out what is in MTG do you have the ingredients. But I have to inject there are likely no ingredients that will speed up hair growth in it.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Carolyn Northcutt (Car75080)
Posted on Sunday, Feb 18, 2001 - 12:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

DrO: I have a bottle of Shapley's M-T-G and it does not list any ingredients. I too wondered what was in it. It smells like bacon grease. It was recommended to me for cuts, fungal infections Tail rubbing and yes, scratches. I tried it for my mares tail rubbing and it didn't help. I haven't used it for anything else. The company phone number is 1-800-982-22017 or 941-415-2275. I thought a company had to list ingredients on it's container but apparently not. It must be a "secret" formula.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Sunday, Feb 18, 2001 - 12:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

As always, I do not recommend folks use products that they do not know what they contain.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rachel Dahl (Rachel2)
Posted on Tuesday, Feb 20, 2001 - 9:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Carolyn's right - my bottle of MTG doesn't list any ingredients either. It didn't work at all on my horse for the scratches.

As a follow-up to using the Cortisone/Neosporin/Desitin/Panalog/Furacin formula I posted above, a cautionary note: My farrier said to beware of applying the mixture anywhere near the coronary band. One of my horse's deepest scratches was right on the skin immediately above the coronary band. The farrier says he notices a small ridge there now that may either have been caused by the cream, or (and this is what I suspect) the deep-rooted scratch itself. He told me to apply vaseline to the area. I don't think there's anything in the "formula", do you, that would produce this effect on the coronet?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Wednesday, Feb 21, 2001 - 7:34 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I agree Rachael the inflammation at the level of the coronet is most likely to cause such a ring. However if you applied anything regularly to the coronet for a length of time that either kept the area warmer or penetrated the skin and affected the physiology, even if in a minor way, might create a ring.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joy Drost (Joyd)
Posted on Wednesday, Feb 21, 2001 - 12:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I use a mixture of the following and it works great:

1/2 jar of Furacin ointment
1 tube of Panalog
2 tubes of Neosporin Triple Antibiotic
2 tubes of Desitin
10 cc's Dexamethesone (spelling)

Mix this all up and apply it to DRY heels twice a day...before going outside and when you bring the horse back in BEFORE putting the horse in it's stall...It works like a charm!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

3rsatsmf (3rsatsmf)
Posted on Wednesday, Feb 21, 2001 - 12:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Do you use the above mixture to prevent scratches? Or to treat them once they crop up? By the way, Dr. O, I called Shapley's and they were reluctant to give me ingredients. When I told them I had a pink-skinned horse, they did reveal that Sulfur was part of the "old time" formula and that would be the only thing to cause a problem from a reaction standpoint. Not much to go on there but I'm going to look to see that there are ingredients listed on all of my other grooming products. I appreciate the tip.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joy Drost (Joyd)
Posted on Wednesday, Feb 21, 2001 - 1:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

You use it as a treatment, however, in a horse that is prone to scratches, I use it daily anyway. I have a 5 year old mare that is very prone to scratches and gets them just thinking about them...I treat her twice a day and so far so good....I don't clip the hair away but am very careful to keep that area dry, dry, dry!!! I use a clean towel and rub the hair until it's clean and dry..then apply the ointment. This mare is not pink skinned, however, I did have a gray mare that had a terrible case of scratches when I got her...The first thing that I used was straight Panalog; it seemed to make it worse so I got this recipe from an old horseman here in Maine and it worked like a charm!

Joy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Guillermo García (Guille)
Posted on Tuesday, May 1, 2001 - 8:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My name is Guillermo García, a vet. from Pilar Argentine. Since many years I treat scratches in horses with Iruxol oiniment. This is a combination of Cloramfenicol and Colagenasa two times a day and I cover the area with gauze and bandage. Before this I clean the area whit Povidone Iodine solution an then dry the zone.
This is the best treatment that I had used for years.The recovery is too fast (7-10 days). I used Panolog, Furacín (Nitrofurazone oiniment), Propóleo without succes.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Wednesday, May 2, 2001 - 7:34 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello DrG,
Thanks for your imput. What is cloagensa? Here in the US the use of chloramphenical has been greatly curtailed because of the concerns of rare toxic reactions (fatal aplastic anemia) in humans that come into contact with it.

I am aware that these concerns of toxicity continue to be questioned due to the results of large epidemiological studies of aplastic anemia. In fact, when you look at all the data critically I think it is very likely that chloramphenicol will be shown to have been unfairly tagged with this comlication. Odd, as this is pretty widely accepted in the medical community, at least in this country.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Guillermo García (Guille)
Posted on Friday, May 4, 2001 - 10:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Dr.O: I know about the rare adverse efects of cloramfenicol in humans that could induce Aplastic anemia. In my conuntry this drug is not prohibed and exist for oral route also (capsules). Colagenasa is an enzime that degrade colagen bundles and then improve the antibiotic difusion.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Saturday, May 5, 2001 - 5:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ahh..over here we call this collagenase and for the readers that want to try it you can find this in a product called STYP-ZYME.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rachel Dahl (Rachel2)
Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2001 - 10:45 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I tried Guillermo's cream "IRUXOL" and, after battling scratches since summer 2000, in only 5 days of using the cream, my horse is almost completely healed. The hair has grown back and even the deepest of the scratches at the heel is looking nice now.

I bought the cream while on vacation in Italy where it's sold over the counter quite cheaply as an antiseptic. When I returned, the scratches were fairly bad because I hadn't treated them for a week. I've only been able to apply the cream once a day and since it's been raining here, my horse has been standing in a muddy paddock all week. So - if it works under these unfavorable conditions, I'd highly recommend it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Smith (Banger)
Posted on Friday, Aug 16, 2002 - 5:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Has anyone ever heard of using Pine Tar for Scratches and Grease Heel? An old-timer said he had kept Pine Tar smeared over the affected area through the winter months when he wasn't using his horse. The Pine Tar doesn't wash off, it has to wear off and this provides protection which allows healing. He said this was the only thing he found successful in clearing up the scabs on his Paint horse and best of all, it never returned.
What is your response to this?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Saturday, Aug 17, 2002 - 12:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I don't know if this effective but what a mess!
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Shelley Wiley (Swiley)
Posted on Monday, Aug 19, 2002 - 12:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Friend of mine has been battling scratches with her 18 yr old horse all his life. Every summer he gets it, and it doesnt rain here in CA. There has been some thought that sun can aggravate scratches. This might be why all of these coating products work so well(desetin, pine tar, zinc oxide etc). I know that in alot of horses, this area can be quite hairless even before the scratches. She is trying bell boots this summer, I will let you know how it works.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fiona Farrell (Lala)
Posted on Thursday, Aug 22, 2002 - 12:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just got off the phone with my vet after getting some advice that really threw me for a curve. I was calling to ask for some Gentomicin(SP?). He said "use Frontline."

Background: The scratches on my mare's pasterns have suddenly gotten far worse despite treatment with tea tree oil and Hibiclens mix I tried, before that I had been using my fave Nolvasan higher up on cannons to soften and pull off months old scabs that then partially healed. Some part of the scratches problem is also exacerbated by her foal who steps on her pasterns/coronets.

If one enters "Frontline scratches" in the HA search engine one gets to UCDavis Horse Report Oct 2001 "Pastern Dermatitis in Shires and Clydesdales." The thinking in that article is that scratches is a complicated immune-mediated systemic disease so that different agents can set off the problem that also set off a misdirected response by the horse's own defense mechanisms. This is cited as a partial reason "why the list of failed treatments is so long."

But the article did have some practical recommendations that echo a lot of what people who have had success have cited in this and related threads.

1. Cleanliness and dryness extremely important.

2. Topical antimicrobial or antifungal preparations are marginally helpful because other organisms arise and they do not treat the underlying disease. If do use, best if rotate types every three days. Basically don't use toxic or irritating preps.

3. One topical that helps is sulfur based preps applied daily. This may explain the help some have seen with the mysterious M.T.G. The article mentions two forms for sulfur. A. Wetable sulfur dusting powder from gardening supply stores, mix with mineral oil to milk shake consistency, massage deeply, key is working it into affected areas of skin (seems problematic to me in open wound situations so prefer second suggestion). B. Sulferated lime solutions such as used for dermatitis in dogs and cats, LymDyp was cited. This calls for soaking the skin "for a sufficient period of time" but does not say how long sufficient is.

3. And then they get to the third approach which is what my vet recommended and what threw me for a loop. I'll just cite from the article.

"Additionally, mange mites definitely must be controlled as they can be both an inciting cause and a compounding stimulant to the condition. To control infestation on an individual horse, a 0.25% fipronil (Frontline) solution, the commonly used canine flea and tick agent can be used. This solution can easily be periodically sprayed on the horse's legs to prevent infestation. . . . In conjunction with the treatment of the individual horse, the stalls, wash racks, feed rooms, and other working areas of the barn should also be cleaned and sprayed periodically with a permethrin aerosol spray to remove environemental mite infestation."

So, maybe this info will help someone. I'm going to try the Frontline, permethrin spray and go to my dog and cat vets for some sulfur dip. And I really like the sound of Jordana's either pure desitin or desitin based mix -- they simply sound soothing and protective tho of course there is that resistance worry. I also wonder what difference fly boots might make to simply keep flies from landing/irritating/as vectors.

Has anyone tried Frontline or sulfur solutions on their horses? Results?

Hope this info is as interesting to you all as it was to me, and even more here's hoping it helps, Fiona

PS - those of you who have seen my posting re people depending on articles should get a big laugh out of this. But the quality of info in this article compared to the one in Equus on weaning are worlds apart. I also think the need for cleanliness in all of this, both the horse and its environment, is something the old stud grooms knew.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Friday, Aug 23, 2002 - 6:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

WHOOOA OUT THERE!
Pastern dermatitis caused by mange mites have a very specific presentation: the horses are very itchy down there. The cause of the dermatitis is frequently the self-mutilation caused by the itching, this should not be confused with the all too common "scratches". For more on mites see Equine Diseases: Skin Diseases: Lice and Mites of Horses. For more on scratches see the article at Equine Diseases: Skin Diseases: Scratches, Grease Heel, Dew Poisoning, & Mud Fever.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Janet Milligan
New Member
Username: Janmilli

Post Number: 1
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 11, 2002 - 9:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Howdy,

I am a novice horse owner with little knowledge but lots of determination. I have a nearly 2 yr old arabian filly with white socks and nose, and she has a "sunburn" to beat all sunburns! She also has what I think is scratches on one white foot which started out looking like a patch of dried mud behind her pastern, and now there are also bumpy areas and horizontal lines up her cannons. I am wondering if these two problems could be related (photosensitivity, allergic reactions, etc.). There is another horse on this pasture who has the white nose and feet but no scratches or sunburn. My filly is never in a stall, always in a dry paddock at night, but out in a pasture every morning and day. I'm sure there is dew on the grass in the morning. The pasture was left to grow very long before it was trimmed, so there is lots of stubble as well as burdock and thistle which could cause small cuts which could later be infected. I have read about so many treatments, should I start with the Panalog or iruxol? Where do I get them? Should I clean first with Hib. or not? My filly won't let me put anything on her nose- it is cracked and sometimes bleeding- she just tosses her head and fights any treatment. I think it hurts her a lot. She is otherwise an eager to please girl. I don't have any way to shut her out of the sun- she has a run in, but would go nuts if kept in there because she is used to freedom and being with other horses. I tried a long fly mask and found it shredded in pieces the next day in the pasture! Help!! anyone!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jill V. Reed
Member
Username: Verlaj

Post Number: 23
Registered: 6-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 11, 2002 - 10:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Maybe the severity of my horse's dermatitis on his white pasterns is pretty mild compared to some of the descriptions here, but I've had great success with a preparation called "Healex," which is an thick ointment that contains zinc oxide and boric acid, I believe. My horse is always turned out, so there is no protecting him from wet grass or dirt. I have found success in clearing up the skin problem if I wash the affected areas with soap, rinse, gently blot dry, then apply a generous coat of "Healex." I only have to do this every two to three days. Obviously, others have attested to the helpfulness of zinc oxide, but I think maybe the Healex also helps because the coating remains and keeps the dirt and moisture from the pasture from reaching the skin. This year when I came back from vacation, his skin looked pretty bad - red, oozing, scabby, and very sore to touch. Only a few days of treatment as above really eased the situation and now there's hardly a problem.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Linda Antipala
Member
Username: Alika

Post Number: 185
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Thursday, Sep 12, 2002 - 3:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My friend's gelding had a bad case of scratches, same situation, out in a wet pasture. She applied Panalog (from our vet) and it worked wonders. The first few treatments, she just wiped with warm water and removed the worst scabs. The sores cleared up so fast. Janet, wanted you to know that my arab mare sometimes get bumps and cuts on her pinkish nose. Could be a reaction to some tall weeds, still kind of a mystery. I've found Desitin to be the answer. Yes, it is difficult to apply a smelly cream on their nose of all places, but it's one of those necessary procedures (like worming, fly spray) that a horse must get accustomed to for their own good! It is heart breaking to see them in pain, but you probably need to just get something on her nose and get it over with, especially with the bleeding. I know it's not easy, but remember it is for her own good. Be careful, maybe get a helper, take your time and let us know how it's going!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 6899
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Sep 12, 2002 - 7:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Janet,
What you have told us is that you cannot do any of the important treatment/environmental changes that might help you prevent these problems. You need to rethink what you can and cannot do.

If you cannot put sunblockers on your horses nose you must get him out of the sun or else the suburn will continue to worsen, at least till he gets use to the sun, but some horses always burn. There skin and hair coat are too light. For some advice on changing your horses behavior towards treating the nose see, Training Horses » Behavioral Problems » Behavior Modification, Conditioning, Desensitization, and Counterconditioning.

The answer to your questions on proper treatment are answered clearly in the article associated with this forum. The easiest way to get to it is to go to the top of the page and select: » Scratches, Grease Heel, Dew Poisoning, & Mud Fever ». On this page you will find the link to the article. Also notice that there are a list of other discussions on this subject and a button at the botom for starting a new discussion (thread).
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Claudette C. Dumont
Member
Username: Madame

Post Number: 26
Registered: 7-1999
Posted on Monday, Sep 23, 2002 - 10:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi,

First encounter with what seems to be scratches... Actually thought they were burns from my horse's bell boot...

Cleaned the area soaking with warm water and Javex. All the scabs came off easily and the spots were left a bit granulous and oozy... I event thought of proud flesh... I poured a herbal solution called something like Schreiner... The same evening I went back the whole spot was dry and already the healing process had seemed to start. I rinsed again today with the water javex mixture... I will keep a close eye on this and let you know the exact name of the product... And how things turn out...

Thanks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Claudette C. Dumont
Member
Username: Madame

Post Number: 27
Registered: 7-1999
Posted on Monday, Oct 28, 2002 - 7:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well what do you know...

Or do you care?

A week treatment whit this herbal solution... All is fine... The hair has grown back... Yeah...

If anyone is listening!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

KATHLEEN WHEAT
Member
Username: Kathleen

Post Number: 73
Registered: 9-1999
Posted on Monday, Oct 28, 2002 - 8:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Claudette,
What exactly did you use? What is Javex?
Kathleen
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 7190
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 29, 2002 - 7:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Claudette,
You seem upset that you did not get feedback. Let me make some suggestions to help you get more responses. Though this was an OK spot to post this if you want more responses you should start your own discussion. More folks will find your post that way. Though we are delighted whenever someone posts their experiences a response is not always needed. Be sure if you want feedback that you make it clear.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Claudette C. Dumont
Member
Username: Madame

Post Number: 29
Registered: 7-1999
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 29, 2002 - 2:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi,

Javex... is chlorine bleach... ;)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Claudette C. Dumont
Member
Username: Madame

Post Number: 30
Registered: 7-1999
Posted on Tuesday, Oct 29, 2002 - 2:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

And the exact name of the product is: Schreiner's Herbal Solution

;)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

C. Chew
New Member
Username: Kchew

Post Number: 4
Registered: 2-2002
Posted on Friday, Jan 3, 2003 - 8:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi there,

A question from yet antother horse owner battling scratches: Has anyone tried using hydrogen peroxide rinses before applying desitin, etc?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 7524
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Jan 4, 2003 - 10:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peroxide is not a very good antiseptic. In fact it is down right poor at killing anything but anerobes.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

C. Chew
Member
Username: Kchew

Post Number: 5
Registered: 2-2002
Posted on Monday, Jan 6, 2003 - 8:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the info Dr. O. My latest approach is to use commercially available alcohol impregnated tissues plus furacin and the Corona mastitis cream (?udder butter). This actually seeems to be working! A racetrack veteran suggested sauerkraut juice. Any idea how that might work?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kerry bixby
Member
Username: Parfait

Post Number: 26
Registered: 5-2001
Posted on Monday, Jan 6, 2003 - 11:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have actually used this once while living in Ohio. I was told to put a bread bag on my horse's foot, pour a can of sauerkraut in it (with juice) and tape it up and leave it for 2-3 days. I managed to leave it for 2 days before curiosity killed me and I have to say, it worked. I had been using all kinds of very expensive and conventional stuff before that--could be the combination. :-) Good luck!

Kerry
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 7544
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 7, 2003 - 7:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello C,
How it might work...no...but if you run a search you will find others who have recommend it on this board.

Your mixture is not surprising that it works, it protects the legs from moisture and is antibacterial. Be careful with frequent furacin use, both humans and horses have developed contact sensitivity (allergies) to it.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

C. Chew
Member
Username: Kchew

Post Number: 6
Registered: 2-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Jan 7, 2003 - 7:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O and Kerry,
Thanks for the input. Sauerkraut very interesting! The racetrack person speculated it might be the acid (?). Thanks for the furacin tip, Dr.O.

Has anyone tried to culture the sores to see what kind of bacteria/fungi are present? My horse gets round weepy areas on both back feet, which have white socks, and sometimes also on the foot in front with a white sock but never on the solid chestnut front foot.

Kay
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 7551
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 8, 2003 - 5:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes culturing can be very helpful and the article on Scratches addresses this briefly.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rita Terrell
Member
Username: Taerie

Post Number: 2
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Jul 5, 2003 - 10:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My horse came up with what must be what is called greasy heel. Oozy scabs on the back of his heels under his pasterns. I tried Jordana's recipe above of cortizone/desitin and neosporin and it cleared it up in only a couple of days. He has had something going on on the skin of the very fronts of his pasterns for some time. Just slightly scabby and the hair is thin. Might this respond to the same stuff? I may try it. My vet is scheduled to come out at the end of this month for his WNV booster so if nothing works she can have a look at it then I guess. Kansas has been very hot and humid lately and its hard to keep him dry.. but the cannon thing has been lurking for a long time.. never QUITE going away even over the winter..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jordana Meisner
Member
Username: Presario

Post Number: 508
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Monday, Jul 7, 2003 - 10:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Rita - my bay gelding has the cannon bone crud frequently too - never seems to QUITE go away during the winter, comes in the Spring, I scrub it away, it goes away leaving the front of his cannons fairly hairless, hair grows back, and the crud comes back. I just live with it after all these years :\ Glad the recipe worked for you!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bobbi Balgobin
Member
Username: Balgobib

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 10, 2003 - 9:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I read with great interest all the various scratches cures folks had posted in this string. Being the retentive person I am, I opted to rotate a few of them when my gelding came up with really nasty scratches on his hind fetlocks. After nearly a month of trying different combinations of treatments, the following worked like a charm. Betadine scrub, rinse and dry. Panalog ointment with diaper rash ointment over that. The scabs virtually fell off in 48 hours and there is pretty pink healthy skin.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

cindy mette
Member
Username: Cindylou

Post Number: 6
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Saturday, Sep 20, 2003 - 8:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

You know- this is so interesting- and i can't help think that my gelding's sunburn and scatches are related. He had terrible sunburn- even below his mouth- which doesn't make sense since sun never hits there- at the same time has scatches that are better after the clean traz I did- but stil not gone- I am starting to think it may be an allergy or photosensitivity...anyone have any thoughts/experiance on the matter??
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

George Taglioli
Member
Username: Tagloili

Post Number: 39
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Saturday, Sep 20, 2003 - 9:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It is my understanding that scratches are caused by both photosensitivity and grasses eaten at a certain time of the year.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 9155
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Sep 22, 2003 - 6:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

For more on all of these see, » Equine Diseases » Skin Diseases » Overview of Hair Loss & Irritated Skin where reviews of these conditions and links to more detailed articles is provided.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

monica Quinn
New Member
Username: Mjq1

Post Number: 2
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Thursday, Oct 30, 2003 - 7:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My horse also had what many people assumed was a sunburn situation. I disagreed, as his dark skin and chin were also affected. I purchased 100% Aloe Vera Gel and rubbed it on his entire muzzle (after I cleaned it) daily and he got immediately better. I think it is a type of burn from the grass when he grazed as no other part of his body was affected.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathryn Faille
Member
Username: Mymax

Post Number: 5
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Saturday, Jul 10, 2004 - 4:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Dr. O
The discussion here is interesting. With all the rain this spring both of my walking horses developed scratches. I have been very successful in treating with scarlet oil spray and Desitin ointment. I spray the scarlet oil, let it sit a few minutes and then cover the area with the Desitin. It has cleared up both horses in less than 7 days even with them still on wet pastures. (We don't have a dry lot.) Maybe I am lucky but it worked.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joni Valerio
Member
Username: 3rsatsmf

Post Number: 106
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Saturday, Sep 4, 2004 - 6:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Perhaps the best thing I've tried for scratches on my Friesian (those feathers!) is Dermafas cream. I see a noticable improvement over the course of a week; you don't even have to apply every day - I only see Remy 4 times/week and IT WORKS!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11130
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Monday, Sep 6, 2004 - 6:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Joni, what is in the Drmafas?
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Pam Catlin
Member
Username: Pam1

Post Number: 11
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, Sep 9, 2004 - 11:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr.O,

I have a gelding that has scratches and we have been dealing with it in the traditional manner, but now my vet has prescribed a "sweat" consisting of Ivermectin mixed with DMSO, wrapped in saran wrap and polo's for several days. . . .

I saw a prior post regarding other wormers used with DMSO, but still don't understand the application to scratches. Could you give me your opinion?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Pam Catlin
Member
Username: Pam1

Post Number: 12
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, Sep 9, 2004 - 11:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr.O,

One more question - is it Desitin (for diaper rash) or Desinex (for athlete's foot) that should be used? I've seen both mentioned in the posts and my vet has mentioned both. Are they interchangeable?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11156
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Sep 10, 2004 - 9:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Though I have heard of a treatment similar to this for certain types of mite infections that occur in the feathers of the fetlocks, I have not heard of this for typical scratches. We have an article that explains the treatment options, including the use of Desitin. See the article associated with this forum, Equine Diseases » Skin Diseases » Scratches, Grease Heel, Dew Poisoning, & Mud Fever.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michelle Boake
Member
Username: Rein

Post Number: 2
Registered: 1-2004
Posted on Friday, Sep 30, 2005 - 12:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi,

I've too had many a horse with scratches. I spray the area with colloidal silver then slather on hibitane cream. I then cover with a wrap of gauze, then vet wrap and duct tape onto hoof (over and under) to keep it down on heels. If it's a bad case I'll redo the next day, if not then I'll leave it a few days. I have yet to have this fail me.

Good luck to all!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Karen Reilly
Member
Username: poncho

Post Number: 11
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 26, 2007 - 7:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The ingredients to M-T-G are: Petroleum distillates, sulfur 4%, zinc stearate, glycerin, cade oil rectified. I am trying it on my filly with scratches. I will let you know if it works.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 19264
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Sep 27, 2007 - 7:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hmmm....kerosene(?), sulfur, zinc, glycerin and oil. It should work for some cases Karen as it is antibacterial and provides a barrier to moisture.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Hocker
Member
Username: heidih

Post Number: 222
Registered: 9-1999
Posted on Thursday, Sep 27, 2007 - 8:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I believe the petroleum distillates in M-T-G are heavy mineral oils, not kerosene. This stuff isn't flammable, but is pretty oily. I work with Kerosene and it doesn't smell at all like kerosene.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellab
Member
Username: ellab

Post Number: 49
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Friday, Sep 28, 2007 - 7:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wash the area really well and then apply DMSO and furizone and wrap it up - they don't like it - it must really sting but it clears the scratches up really quickly. I have not had scratches they have become a huge issue since I have been using this treatment.

EllaB
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 19270
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Sep 28, 2007 - 8:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Heidi, they should make clear what the petroleum distillates are as this can range from as you say heavy mineral oil all the way up to gasoline. Mineral oils vary tremendously in their properties and level of contamination and should be defined as to whether they are of medical/food grade. And they do have odorlos forms of kerosene. Do you have a reliable source for what the actual distillates are?
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Hocker
Member
Username: heidih

Post Number: 223
Registered: 9-1999
Posted on Friday, Sep 28, 2007 - 1:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I agree they should make it clear.

I knew it wasn't kerosene, based upon years of experience as a chemist working with kerosene (and other pet. distillates), but I didn't have any specific documentation. So I called Shapley's and requested an MSDS. The MSDS lists the hazardous components as Heavy paraffinic petroleum oil and precipitated sulfur. The hazards are listed as inhaling a mist of the petroleum oil and inhaling the dust of the Sulfur. Both of which are unlikely when using the product as directed (and not putting it in a sprayer).

I intended to attach the MSDS below, but I can't make it small enough and still be readable. The PDF file is too big and a jpeg that's small enough can't be read.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Reka Schippers
New Member
Username: reka07

Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Friday, Sep 28, 2007 - 4:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have read most of the posts on this topic today and I am amazed how many people are on trial & error with scratches.
BtW I use DMSO only as carrier for other medications.

I believe there are scratches and there is a liver disease resulting in scabs all over white parts of the horse, it might be a good idea to differentiate between the two.

In my trial & Error period (over the last 20 years) and that is still ongoing I tried similar concoctions of any one above mentioned ,I found out that sulfur seems to work good for my horses.I mix up Zink Creme (diaper rash) with sulfur powder and apply on cleaned and dry scratches.This seems to help.This year was particularly bad here in BC Canada and I put out a high sulfur salt block for my horses , that is supposed to help against bug's.
I thought sulfur, I will try it for the scratches and both mares that had scratches cleaned up within a week of adding the sulfur block.
Hope this might help someone, as it is not easy to find the right remedie for scratches we will all need to keep trying.
My thought on it is , if it does not clear within max 2 weeks ask your vet before you try something else .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 19276
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Sep 29, 2007 - 9:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Reka there are actually many causes of scratches and often the horse's management creates conditions that promote it to the point that any treatment does not work. This may account for the reason some folks trouble with any particular treatment. The article on Scratches explains this and gives therapy and management factors based on diagnosis and a fairly logical progression of therapy if one fails.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Diane
Member
Username: dianes

Post Number: 30
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 5, 2008 - 11:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Boy, seems like a lot of folks have had problems with scratches. I didn't read all these posts, but after a few minutes, I realized my favorite treatment remedy hadn't been mentioned. I SWEAR by this, having treated my white-socked mare each spring with a variety of topicals, always treating thru the entire summer. However, NOW I just get the Clorox out and mix it 50/50 with water. I wash her feet every other day with an antibacterial hand soap and a soft brush. Then towel dry and spray on TONS of the Clorox/water mix. You only have to do that every other day. Within two weeks, her scabs were DRY, DRY, DRY and falling off when I suds her up. And her white socks were REALLY white! This treatment is effective and cheap, and the every other day approach is great. It does seem to sting her for the first few applications, but then she's fine.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alicia Moore
Member
Username: aannk

Post Number: 866
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 5, 2008 - 11:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

this mix (bleach and h2o) is also good for thrush
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jos
Member
Username: paardex

Post Number: 952
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 5, 2008 - 12:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

French recipe:1 part Imaverol 1 part corticosteroid creme 1 part baby creme 1 part vaseline. I was desperate so I tried it[the imaverol part scared me a bit] but it worked and is inexpensive too. because of the vaseline it keeps the skin dry to for a reasonable amount of time[once a day while on pasture works fine over here]
Jos
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Janice Todd
New Member
Username: gurgi

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2008
Posted on Friday, Nov 7, 2008 - 2:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My nice mare has scratches, it's winter so everything is frozen but the scabs on her left hind heels seem persistent. I've been soaking in epson salt and water or providine and water and scrubbing.
Then apply a 1:1:1 mixture of DMSO, fenbendazole, and furazone and wrap it with vet wrap. But, this is caused by damp/wet. Should I NOT wrap it with the vet wrap??? Thanks,
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nadia F
Member
Username: nadia

Post Number: 151
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Friday, Nov 7, 2008 - 4:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

For the past few months, one of my horses has had a large patch on his hind foot - twice as big as a half dollar. The scabs were so tough. I had started out using water to try to soften the scabs, then soaked the scabby area with betadine, then put a mixture (1:1:1) of neosporin, desenex and desitin (generic version) on it (found this recipe somewhere on this site). Nothing seemed to help for awhile. I think the water was feeding it. I then decided to stop the water entirely. At the same time, I ran out of the generic desitin and subsituted the real stuff. I didn't want to use it as I didn't like the smell, but within a few days, the scabs started falling off in chunks! I had found an earlier post here that said to use the real stuff, not generic. Another post had mentioned using Vicks (suggested by a vet). My horse did not like me messing with the area at first, but he no longer is kicking out when I apply it. Almost all the scabs are gone now (about a week) and I think it is mostly healed up. I'm not sure how to keep this from coming back though. Once there is no broken skin, I may put a little vicks on there every few days. It is now cold and rainy here, so I suspect it could come back very easy. I hope the vicks isn't too harsh.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Zaneis
Member
Username: vickiann

Post Number: 793
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Friday, Nov 7, 2008 - 5:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Once you get rid of all of the scabs and broken skin, the Desitin is also useful for prevention when the horses are in less than ideal circumstances with regard to moisture.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fran C
Member
Username: canter

Post Number: 1737
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Friday, Nov 7, 2008 - 5:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

If the horse will tolerate it, blow dry the area after washing with the betadine scrub and before putting on the Neosporin & Desitin. That way you're not trapping more moisture under the ointments.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Diane
Member
Username: dianes

Post Number: 31
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Saturday, Nov 8, 2008 - 9:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have an Arabian mare with 3 white socks, and she gets scratches every spring. I've tried an assortment of treatments, ones sold to me by the vet, some concoctions I've read about. I've spent entire summers doing daily treatments fighting an outbreak of scratches on this mare. Long story short, I no longer do any of the above. When she predictably shows signs in the spring of scratches, I mix up a spray bottle of half bleach/half water. I scrub the affected socks with an antibacterial soap, then towel dry. I then SATURATE her socks with the bleach/water solution. You only have to do this every other day. After a week or so, the scabs begin to disappear. I keep at it until they're all gone. I don't think I've ever had to work beyond a month at it. It's easy, it's cheap, and it works - my formula for success!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 21690
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Sunday, Nov 9, 2008 - 10:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome Janice,
For our recommendations on treating Scratches see the article associated with this discussion. To access it click on Scratches, Grease Heel, Dew Poisoning, & Mud Fever above.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Janice Todd
New Member
Username: gurgi

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2008
Posted on Monday, Nov 10, 2008 - 6:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

We have wet snow now. any ideas on how to keep a heel dry? I can blow dry the areas and she's fine with that, but I'm having trouble getting scabs off in the heel area... soaking first? does that help? or changing the pH of the heel with vinegar or the 50/50 chlorox and water???
But the big question is how to keep her heel dry.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rachelle E. Morris
Member
Username: rtrotter

Post Number: 62
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Monday, Nov 10, 2008 - 9:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

SInce we are all talking about remedies for scratches. Here is my remedy. Mane & Tail puts out a shampoo that is Antibacterial and Anti microbial very similar to Nolvasan scrub but 1/2 the cost. Squirt a bit in a bucket and fill it 1/2 full with warm water. Wash Horses legs and heels and make sure you rinse the horses legs off. Wipe legs and heels off with a dry towel. Take some Furafree paste and spread in heels and rub in good. Let sit for a few minutes to soften scabs and then rub with a towel to remove as many scabs as you can, you may have to do this a few times on each heel to clean up the loosening scabs and you may not be able to do this all in one day. It depends on how much your horse will tolerate.

I have used several things to keep the heels clean and dry and it also depends on whether your horse is in or out.

You can use Desitin ( Generic) or talcum powder on heels, put a kotex pad in the heel and use a few sheets of sheet cotton to make a lower leg bandage that goes from halfway down the foot, (you will need to tape the vetrap on the foot to keep it in place)to right above the ankle, vetwrap this and leave on 1 day.

This works whether or not your horse is in a stall or out in a field and this only has to be done when the heels are very scabby. Once the scabs are off and well healed. The Desitin will keep them dry.

The trick is once the scabs are gone to make sure they do not come back. Keeping the heels dry is the best remedy.

I had a girl taking care of my horses for a while and my horses started to get really bad heels which they didn't have before and I could not figure out why. Then I watched her one day. On one horse, she was putting coldwater bandages on and putting ointment on the heels while the horses legs were wet, since the heels were never dry, the ointment made the scratches worse. The scratches cleared up once I stopped the coldwater bandages, dried the heels, picked off the scabs ( first softening them with the furafree)and using the Desitin on them. Everything was cleared up in 3 days.

IMO, I also noticed that I have less problems with bad heels on horses where their fetlock hair is not clipped. I think the water drips away from the heel instead of running down into it and that helps the heel dry more quickly.

Good Luck with your horse.
Rachelle
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sharon
New Member
Username: sgrinage

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2008
Posted on Tuesday, Nov 18, 2008 - 11:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello everyone. I am new to the site. My horse has had scratches (dew poisoning) for a very long time. I was using a fungus ointment with the destin on top. It kept it under controlled but never went away. After reading everyones post, I am using the betadine scrub which got most of all the scabs off and I did a mixture of the cortizone,noesporin and destin. I caked it on and tried to wrap his back ankles but the plastic and vet wrap just rode up his ankles. One leg he will not pick up at all due to his shivers.I want to know how important it is to wrap his legs because he was already getting shavings on his ankles. Any advice would be great. Thank you. Sharon}}
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michelle Boake
New Member
Username: rein

Post Number: 1
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Tuesday, Nov 18, 2008 - 11:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Sharon,

If you can get him to ever so slightly step forward so his heel is off the ground. Then you can get a few wraps of vet wrap under his heel. Then rip about 4 5 inches of duct tape and put a few under and over as well. That should do the trick, I can have that stay on 3 to 4 days even.
Good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michelle Boake
New Member
Username: rein

Post Number: 2
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Tuesday, Nov 18, 2008 - 11:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thought I may as well put my two cents in here too. We have had many a horse with scratches too. The best I have found is to just slather with hibitane cream/ointment. Wrap gauze around, then vet wrap, taking it under to hoof to hold down there. Duct tape the back 3/4 of foot up and leave for two days the first go then a few more and all the scabs pretty much rub right off. Even worked with the one mare who was real bad and walked like she had broken legs. Worried about sunburn after though so wrapped fleece on her for a week or so after. Her white stockings were pink after all the scabbing was off. Simple!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris Mills in NC
Member
Username: chrism

Post Number: 1262
Registered: 4-1999
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 23, 2009 - 2:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My 26 yo has been battling scratches the last few weeks and I was doing Dr. O's routine ... But, my friend suggested a recipe that has worked so much faster and is much easier, especially if it is cooler and you don't want to splash a lot of cold water around.

Her recipe is equal parts of 1) diaper rash ointment, 2) triple antibiotic ointment, 3) hydrocortisone cream and 4) athlete's foot cream. We buy the generic equivalents in Wal-Mart and the tube of the athlete's foot cream is the smallest, so that is the basis of the volume mixing.

Then we just rub this mixed paste into the scabby areas, gradually softening and picking off the scabs and then topping off with a protective layer. ONE treatment made a g'normous difference to my mare. I was so excited by the results. If my mare's legs are dirty, I first curry with a small face curry.

My friend suggested keeping some mixed up and using at the first hint of scratches. She also uses it as a topical for other skin ick.

Thought I'd share.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 23791
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 23, 2009 - 10:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the information Chris but this does look just like the treatment in the article recommended for horses refractory to topical Desitin / triple-antibiotic alone. As scratches is only rarely (if ever) a fungal disease I thing you can leave the athelete foots creme off. Sustituting a OTC hydrocortisone creme is going to be less expensive than veterinary compounded steroid antimicrobial products and a good idea, one I often recommend.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cheryl Person
New Member
Username: briperso

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2009
Posted on Monday, Aug 9, 2010 - 9:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have not had a case of scratches in many many years. Yesterday, I found a case in my 21 year old stallion and today, I found it on the 24 year old gelding in front of his sheath, pretty bad patch. I've never heard of it occurring there. He also has mastitis as a result. Neither have ever had it, do not live in the same pasture, and it is very hot and dry. I have to guess they got into the same weed perhaps? Are steroid injections advised in the gelding? He foundered 15+ years ago. One or other bute or banamine better for mastitis?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Z
Member
Username: vickiann

Post Number: 2193
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Monday, Aug 9, 2010 - 9:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kind of a strange location for a case of scratches.

Are you sure that it is not a summer sore?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michelle Boake
New Member
Username: rein

Post Number: 5
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Monday, Aug 9, 2010 - 11:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello, I have a tried and true, never fail method. Have many horse so get this a few times a year. I use Hibitane Cream, wrap with cotton or gauze. Then cover with vet wrap. Usually is low on foot so cover under half the hoof. then take strips of duct tape to under foot and part way up. I usually leave 24 hours then change a few times till good. Never have to wash, just thick cream, wrap and done. The scratches just fall off when rubbed lightly.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

DianE
Member
Username: scooter

Post Number: 6963
Registered: 9-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 10, 2010 - 7:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Can geldings get mastitis?? dermavet works very well for scratches for me, I have also had good luck with Tomorrow.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cheryl Person
New Member
Username: briperso

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2009
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 10, 2010 - 5:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm not sure if I know what a summer sore is, but it looks exactly like scratches on the leg - crusty, scaly, in a large patch (bigger than my spread out hand), a little bloody if they peel.

Is dermavet same as panalog.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vicki Z
Member
Username: vickiann

Post Number: 2195
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 10, 2010 - 8:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Summer sores can look rather like that sometimes but often also have a shiny looking area that is reddish-yellowish.

One must wonder if he has been rubbing the area and this will have an effect on the appearance.

If a summer sore, worming with Ivermectin will help but you still need to get the wounded area to heal.

The location is what makes me suspicious that it could be related to a summer sore.
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC