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Discussion on Slobbering???

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debbie borden
Posted on Sunday, Jun 4, 2000 - 8:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My horses have been slobbering excessively. Lots of water or saliva pouring out of their mouths. Probably 1/4 cup @ a time. Anyone know what this is or if it's a problem. I've heard the clover can cause this. They've done it in the past with no apparent problem but someone has told me it's not normal.
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S. T. Bruce
Posted on Sunday, Jun 4, 2000 - 11:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My pasture is about 1/3rd. white clover and at times my mares exhibit the same slobbering as yours. It is my understanding that there is nothing wrong with this and it is natural with horses who eat clover. You might check with your
Vet but I suspect he'll tell you not to worry.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Posted on Monday, Jun 5, 2000 - 8:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

See: The Horseman's Advisor: Equine Diseases: Colic and GI Diseases: Mouth, Esophagus, and Liver: Slobbering, Salivation, and Clover Poisoning.
DrO
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Ima Jeanne Maust (Segovia)
Posted on Monday, Oct 8, 2001 - 8:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Could your horse have access to buttercups in pasture; famous for causing the slobbers!
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Geraldine C. Crane (Geraldin)
Posted on Monday, Dec 3, 2001 - 12:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My older horse started slobbering in early spring of 2001. Since she is arthritic, and is on Equinyl CM, I systematically eliminated all supplements separately to hopefully find the problem. The slobbering began when the horses were still on last years hay, and before they were on any pasture. Also added Annihist daily, increasing to twice daily, still with no change. There is no apparent problem swallowing, since she does not have a problem with pellets, hay, pasture, or water. While she is eating there is not any excess saliva present.
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Teresa Alexander-Arab (Teresaa)
Posted on Thursday, Dec 6, 2001 - 8:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

When exactly does she slobber? Have you checked her teeth for any difficulties or something caught between them?

Teresa
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Kathleen Monico
New Member
Username: Danzhar

Post Number: 1
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Monday, Aug 30, 2004 - 7:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I also have an older (20) mare who slobbers excessively. Her stall is a mess. Stress makes it worse, such as waiting to come into the barn at the end of the day, anticipation of feed, being saddled for a lesson, etc. This mare also has Cushings. I have heard that a Calcium deficiency may contribute to this, but I cannot find any information on it, nor how to alleviate the problem. She is not on clover, etc.,& does not have an obstruction. Help?
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11103
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Tuesday, Aug 31, 2004 - 7:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

How long as the mare been slobering Kathleen and has a careful exam of the mouth been done by a vet?
DrO
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1597
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2006 - 12:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My 25 yr. old mare has started slobbering heavily when it's time to eat, come in from the pasture, etc. She works her mouth in a kind of chewing motion and gets great gobs of frothy, sticky slobber which drops on the ground or floor. She never did this until a month or so ago, and only does it during these "stressful?" times. Once in a while she will also give a strong, deep cough which, if you are in range, will shoot the slobber all over you.

Could there be any medical cause of this? Or, since it's only during "stressful" times, is it just a nervous reaction on her part?

Why she is suddenly "stressed" about these times I don't know. Nothing has really changed in her routine except she isn't ridden as much, and ...now that I think of it...Libby, my injured mare, is getting more attention than she is right now.
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Corinne Meadows
Member
Username: Corinne

Post Number: 454
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2006 - 1:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Could she be chewing more out of nervous tension, creating jaw flexion and thus increased salivation Sara? Would be interesting to hear Dr O's response.

Corinne
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1598
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2006 - 3:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Maybe, Corrine. I didn't think about it until I started posting about it, but could be she's just stressed because I'm paying attention to Libby and not her - spoiled girl that she is! I don't appreciate all the slobber; I think it's a messy, "nasty" habit. If there's not a medical reason for it, then I'd like to know how to break her of the habit. First, rule out any medical reasons, though.
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Erika L
Member
Username: Erika

Post Number: 294
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2006 - 7:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My horses get this every few summers. I believe it is due to a fungus on clover that makes them slobber. I was told that it is harmless, just gross.
Erika
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1601
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 26, 2006 - 7:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

With the slobbering from clover, don't they slobber kind of all the time? Also, she is seldom turned out, though there is some clover in the fields, but not much. I'll go read the article on clover. I didn't before because I assumed they had to have quite a bit of it, and because I thought they slobbered all the time.
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Erika L
Member
Username: Erika

Post Number: 296
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, Jul 27, 2006 - 8:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well Sarah, It is kind of all the time, but if the horse has been standing around for a few minutes, when it opens its mouth to chew or take the bit, etc., it sometimes results in Niagara Falls all of a sudden.

Sometimes they just have their lips closed. When they open them--watch out!

Don't know if this s what your horse is doing, but this is the time of year and the sort of conditions when mine will get the condition.
Erika
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1605
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Jul 27, 2006 - 3:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, with the kind of unusually humid weather we are having, I guess the clover could be it even though it's something I've never seen or heard of in this area. I've put her in a stall with a fan on due to the heat and the flies, and I'll see how she does. She seems happy and healthy otherwise...well, at least healthy. She's bummed at me right now because I'm giving Libby so much attention.
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