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Discussion on Newborn with contracture affecting both knees

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Tara Rich (Tara)
Posted on Saturday, May 19, 2001 - 8:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a seven-day-old Paint colt that was born with both contracted tendons and angular limb deformities affecting both front limbs. Regarding the contractural problem, his knees buckled forward. He could move around okay (not great). He had that most trouble when standing still. He would start to fall forward and have to catch himself. The vet examined him at about 24 hours of age and gave him tetracyline, wrapped his legs, from just above the fetlock to 1/2 way between the knee and elbow. Within 24 hours, his kness could lock back momentarily and I thought we were out of the woods. Today, five days after treatment, he is back to knuckling over dramatically again. I've kept him confined to a small paddock in the day and a foaling stall at night. My vet says he's done all he knows to do for him, and he'll probably improve with time. What concerns me in addition to his current problems is that this mare usually has foals born with flacid tendons (that do correct themselves within a few days). But later her babies ALWAYS grow super fast from 2 months to 1 year. I have had to deal with developmental flexor contractures with each one, mostly using slow-growth diet. All have turned out great! But, if this one is contracted now, I can't imagine what I'm going to have in a couple of months. I am hoping for some advise/opinions/ideas of how I can get this colt on the right track toward permanent recovery.
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2001 - 12:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Tara,
We have specific instructions for dealing with this problem in the article associated with this forum. Click on Contracted Tendons above and then click on the articles title.
DrO
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Tara Rich (Tara)
Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2001 - 12:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O:

I did read your article. It was great. I've implemented all the non-invasive remedies except splinting. I'm at work 9 hours and can't monitor him during that time. He is EXTREMELY active, even in his 12X16 pen and stall, and I'm concerned that he would get in trouble with splints without supervision.

He seems to be showing a little more improvement each morning, but by afternoon he is always worse again (although usually better than the previous afternoon).

What is your opinion of electro-acuscope/Myopulse therapy? Do you think it may have a positive impact on contractural deformities?

I also put the mare on TDI 10 (wish I had done that months ago). I think a copper deficiency may be the culprit. Do you have any ideas of how I can directly supplement the colt with a proper balance of copper, zinc, and maganese, or have I missed the boat?
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM (Dro)
Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2001 - 10:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

What is your opinion of electro-acuscope/Myopulse therapy? Do you think it may have a positive impact on contractural deformities?
No opinion, I am not even sure what it is.

I also put the mare on TDI 10 (wish I had done that months ago). I think a copper deficiency may be the culprit. Do you have any ideas of how I can directly supplement the colt with a proper balance of copper, zinc, and maganese, or have I missed the boat?
It is never too late to start good nutrition. See, Care for Horses: Nutrition: Minerals and Nutrition for specific recommendations on feeding minerals.
DrO
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