Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Fluphenazine (Prolixin)

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paintmom
Posted on Monday, Mar 15, 1999 - 6:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Could anyone tell me something about the long acting tranquilizer named flufenzine? How long after you use the drug will it show up in a blood test? Would it show up in a DNA hair test? We bought a very calm horse in The middle of December and by the end of feburary we had a extremely hyper horse on our hands. Thanks!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Marlane
Posted on Monday, Mar 15, 1999 - 6:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I guess the main thing is dealing with her behaviour at the present time.She may have been drugged,if so then unless you wish to prove that she was and return her,then it is a matter of dealing with her behaviour.From my own experience some horses are naturally edgey for quite a while when they go to a new home.But then on the other hand there are a lot of factors that could also be affecting her,let us know.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

painted pony
Posted on Monday, Mar 15, 1999 - 6:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Fluphenazine - one brand name is Prolixen - is a phenothiazine. This drug is an antipsychotic in humans. There is a long-acting form, fluphenazine decanoate which is given intramuscularly or subcutaneously in humans with an onset of action generally between 24 and 72 hours after administration. The effects of a single dose of the extended-action injectable drug in humans may last as long as 6 weeks in some patients. Indications (in humans): the management of psychotic conditions, effective in schizophrenia, and for production of a quieting effect in hyperactive or excited psychotic patients. (From the USP DI) Don't know anything about its use in horses.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

The Advisor Vet, RN Oglesby DVM
Posted on Monday, Mar 15, 1999 - 6:45 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have never used this drug in horses. Nor have I any information in any or the texts that I have. I can find a 10 year old reference of this drug causing agitation and repetitive motions in a horse. The horse was further sedated with another drug. It also caused Parkinson like symptoms in another horse. One article suggested it use was not uncommon in horses, but I have not seen any evidence of this myself. The Advisor Vet, RN Oglesby DVM
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

rp
Posted on Monday, Jun 21, 1999 - 7:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Fluphenazine seems to have become increasingly poplular for hyper horses. It does not take the place of training, but tends to have the affect of having already "warmed-up" the horse without the work.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

pnewport
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 23, 1999 - 4:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have used Prolixen on two different horses--one, my mare several years ago when she seemed "psychotic" during her hard heats. The vet who gave it to me was on the race track for years, a cattle rancher, etc., and he said he's used it hundreds of time with no ill effects. He said sometimes it turns a rank horse into a good horse and when the drug wears off they sometimes stay nice. The mare only needed it one time, one year. The gelding I'm using it on now is another case of calm when I bought him and excitable after gaining weight and getting fit. He has a good mind and it hasn't affected his stamina or desire to go. It just seems to have taken the edge off. I'm hoping he'll get used to group riding and stay that way. I didn't know this was a popular drug--first I'd heard of it.

Pam N.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laura Swain
Posted on Wednesday, Feb 9, 2000 - 3:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I just had Fluphenazine recommended to help keep my laid up horse chilled out, but I haven't done it yet. After reading the above info, I'm not sure I'm going to.
Laura
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rodney D
New Member
Username: parker66

Post Number: 3
Registered: 3-2008
Posted on Thursday, Mar 27, 2008 - 4:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I strongly recommend Fluphenazine right after a horse is gelded. You have the results of the horse being cut right away without having to wait for the testosterone to be completely out of their system.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 20349
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Mar 28, 2008 - 6:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I disagree Rodney, in general the potential adverse reactions and unknowns with this unapproved medication are too great for such a cavalier use. Besides, usually the castration itself will slow them down a little for a week or two.
DrO
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Terry Del Grande
New Member
Username: terri1

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2010
Posted on Thursday, Oct 21, 2010 - 9:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a horse with shivers. It was brought to my attention that prolixin may help. What are your thoughts?He is currently on a high fat high fiber diet with regular exercise. He still lifts his leg and trembles it when he is asked to stand.I am out of Ideas.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: dro

Post Number: 25253
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Friday, Oct 22, 2010 - 7:40 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome to Horseadvice Terry,
I believe we can help you with your question but let me get you started off right so you can get the best answer as quick as possible.

You will get more and faster responses if you start your own discussion rather than post at the bottom on another member's discussion. Each discussion is "owned" by the original poster and all replies in that discussion should either directly or indirectly address the concerns of the original poster.

To start your own discussion back up one page using the navigation bar at the top of this page. This will be a Article Page on this topic. Below the article you will find a list of already existing discussions on this topic. Under this list you will find the "Start New Discussion" button. This is a good topic on your subject so you should first review the article as it will have important information on your subject. Next check the titles of the already existing discussions to see if your question has already been answered.

If your question remains unanswered, now is the time to Start a New Discussion. Select a short title that describes your specific concern. A title like "Help!!!" does not help others find your specific topic. Instead something like "Ace for Colic?" allows others to rapidly find and understand what your topic is about just by viewing the title. This is likely to bring more responses from those with some experience with your topic and allows members to find answers to their questions quicker.
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2013
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC