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Discussion on Foal Can't Get Up

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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 21
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 2:08 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My two day old colt can't get up by himself. He had a normal birth, though his Mom was in labor for 24 hours, and is very long legged and can't seem to get his back legs underneath him to get himself up. He scoots around the floor on his side and has skin abrasions as a result. The breeding manager is helping him up to nurse, and he is good on his feet once he gets up and he nurses well.

On the second day his back tendons began to contract. My manager bandaged both and had the vet out. One leg responded to bandaging but the other did not. The vet gave him a shot to relax the tendon and he will be unbandaged after 48 hours, left unbandaged for a day and then rebandaged for 48 hours and then re-evaluated. The vet has also run other tests to rule out infection. The results should be back over the next few days.

Today, he was able to get up at least once on his own. I spent the day with him and the last time he wanted to get up he needed only one boost to get him on his feet. I actually think he is getting a little lazy and expecting help when he wants to nurse. He is very sweet and affectionate with people already.

Has anyone had any experience with this? This is a Westfalian/TB cross. His mother is excellent with him and he is getting good conscientious care.

I, of course, am a nervous wreck and am hopeful that this is something that we can pull him through successfully. He is my first Warmblood foal and obviously, I love him already.

Thanks,

Suzanne
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Christos Axis
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Username: Christos

Post Number: 1003
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 3:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, you will soon miss the times that he was lying quietly on the floor...
I remember 4 horses that were rather uninterested in getting on their legs the first days. They weren't weak or anything, just uninterested in using their legs. Even when on their feet, they wouldn't play, buck or run much for the first 10 days or so.
When they did start using those legs, we were in dear need of a racetrack to accommodate their speed and energy.
They are all extremely fast, very strong, very athletic horses.
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 825
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 9:27 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, I breed warmblood crosses , all have had very long legs and have a hard time figuring out how to lay down and to get up.. by the end of the week tho.. they are experts.. ! My newest colt has the longest legs yet.. It was funny watching him figure out how to use them, he actually had to just DROP to lay down, and well getting up was a chore for a few days.. He managed.. Keep a watchful eye on him and see how he unfolds..

On the first day God created horses , on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 22
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 5:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Christos and Ann,

You've made me feel a whole lot better. My breeding manager has also reassured me that she has seen a lot worse. I will keep you posted and post a picture soon.

Suzanne
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 23
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 6:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Meet Peabody. He will have another "P" name eventually (his father is Pablo), but this one certainly fits for now.

SuzannePeabody's head
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 826
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 7:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

He is beautiful.. Pablo is my neighbor.. very nice stallion indeed! And the sire of the dam?

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 24
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 9:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ann,

Great, you are local. I am at Serpentine Farm in Grass Valley. The mare, Valentine Knight is TB by Tough Knight (goes back to Never Bend, Turn-to, Bold Ruler. A fair amount of Nasrullah dosage overall). I am taking her to Starr Vaughn for Oldenburg inspection with the foal on July 27th. Will you have horses there?

Suzanne
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 827
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 10:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, nothing this year for the Warmblood inspections.. I bred my Diamont/Prince Thatch w/ a a touch of TB/Appy to a pure Appy stallion last year.. .. So no Hano or Oldenburg inspections for me.. ( they frown upon my spotted wonders..) LOL...

How is your filly doing..?

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 828
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 10:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

oh sorry .. COLT..?

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 25
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Saturday, Jun 17, 2006 - 11:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Vet has recommended hospital care until he can get up on his own. I'm waiting to hear from the barn manager how he did today. Vet agreed with you and Christos that this is not uncommom. However, his liver values are slightly elevated and she wants to make sure he is nursing around the clock and getting flushed. We will determine tomorrow.

Too funny about the spots. Here is my first colt from 2004, but there is not a huge market for these except for afficianadoes. This is Chief, son of FourMiles Kawliga out of a TB mare.

SuzanneChief
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 829
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Sunday, Jun 18, 2006 - 12:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oh Suzanne, foals can be so fragile as you well know.. Please keep a careful watch on this one..

I am breeding more for the sport horse type, thus the longer legs, more angle in the shoulders for front leg extension.. long elegant necks.. (that can be hard to keep straight at times hehehe ).. but, boy oh boy.. i love the black and white.. My little Tommy will be black and white.. only i am afraid more of the varnish roan type then the blanket.. :-(

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 26
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Sunday, Jun 18, 2006 - 11:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Barn manager called this morning and Peabody is up and about on his own. She will watch him throughout the day and make sure he continues this progress. If he is doing well, then we are left with the contracted tendon behind to deal with. Meanwhile, I am alerting the hospital and hauling my trailer up there to be ready to go.

Anyone have advice on hauling a foal and Mom when the foal is shakey on his feet?

Suzanne
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Little King Ranch
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Username: Eoeo

Post Number: 270
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, Jun 18, 2006 - 1:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I hauled a mare and bay 250 miles when he was born with contracted tendons. We put splints on the front legs and he was treated with tetracycline to relax the tendons and given gastrogard to prevent ulcers. When I hauled, I put all the dividers to the wall and secured them giving the mare and colt the whole trailer and left them loose. Mom will not step on him if he is laying down. That way, he has room to get up on his own to nurse if he desires as tyou go down the road. EO
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 830
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Sunday, Jun 18, 2006 - 4:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ditto what EO said.. I had to haul my colt only 3 hours old on a 100 + degree day.. we pulled out the center divider and let mare and foal free... they were fine.. I do this for the inspections as well.. Mom tries very hard not to step on the foal.. and if she can move her head about or body to where she is comfortable the foal becomes more so too..
fingers crossed you won't have to haul out..

On the first day God created horses on the second day he painted them with spots.
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 27
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2006 - 12:23 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peabody was up on his feet three more times today by the time I got there with the trailer. We took the bandage off for the contracted tendon and Mom took him outside to play. He was doing some giddy-up and the heel of the back foot hits the ground, though it is cocked over at the fetlock. Hopefully that will straighten out with time.

If he continues this progress I will not have to haul out, but we'll make that decision in the morning.

Thanks for your advice and support. Pictures attached. It is the left hind that is contracted. I've seen worse.

Suzanne Day 3 - 1Day 3 - 2
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Holly Wood
Member
Username: Hwood

Post Number: 1239
Registered: 3-2001
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2006 - 12:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, goodness, gracious!!! No wonder the little fella' couldn't get up . . . those are some LONNGGGGGGGG legs!!! He has a right to be uncoordinated! Bless his little heart . . . Thanks for the pics!
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 28
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2006 - 1:27 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I know. Can you believe it? He looks like a baby giraffe.

Suzanne
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 831
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2006 - 2:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

OH MY he is beautiful.. and what long legs.. I LOVE EM.. Like i said my guys took a bit to figure out how to work em.. .. usually got a lateral walk at first too.. them legs are hard to deal with , like walking on stilts. !~ What a face.. ahhh.. i can't wait to see him filled out more.. CONGRATS..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 29
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, Jun 19, 2006 - 11:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peabody took a turn for the worse this morning, couldn't get up and opened up some of the bed sores he had developed. With possible infection looming and 24/7 care needed we hospitalized him this morning (at Loomis, Ann). He has been placed in ICU, adminstered profalactic antibiotics and placed under constant supervision. His abrasions will be treated and dressed as needed. He will be given fluids if needed and new blood tests will be run to assure all of his values are within normal range.

His prognosis is good. They x-rayed the fetlock of the contracted tendon leg and on preliminary look thought it was normal and that that problem would self-correct with support (splinting) and ocytet, if needed, with much improvement expected once he is up and about on his own and exercising regularly.

He is receiving the support he needs to get on his feet (literally) and I am optimistic.

The hero in all this (besides my business partner, Jane) is Peabody's mother, Valentine. She has been a trooper throughout, protective but more than willing to accept and accommodate human help for her son.

We hauled them in my Warmblood slantload with her tied loosely in front and him loose, no partition, and no straw. She stabilized him between herself and a wall with her feet spread wide for the one hour trip. He stayed up the whole way.

When we pulled into the clinic I got out to check on him and he was actually nursing.

Valentine was with him in the lab while he had his x-rays done and stayed calm as long as she could see and touch him, even when the door to the operating room opened and they brought a completely anesthetised horse out, lifted him up by his feet on the hoist and maneuvered him into the recovery stall.

I feel better now. I think I will be brining a completely different colt home when they release him.

Suzanne
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Sara Wolff
Member
Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1423
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 - 10:11 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, as I'm sure you know, Loomis is a great clinic with doctors and staff that really care about their patients. When we lived in N. California they saved the lives of a couple of foals we had.
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 30
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 - 12:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes Sara,

They have a whole new large animal facility now and it is beautiful. I was doing my nervous Nelly thing checking him in and they sent me to a picture board full of before and after shots of sickly foals (much worse than mine) that had come in and gone out all recovered and full of vim and vigor. I'm waiting for their morning call as I write.

I am expecting another foal next week (Landkonig/D'Lady (Diamont). Sure hope it goes more smoothly than this one.

Suzanne
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Ann
Member
Username: Dres

Post Number: 832
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 - 8:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, wishing luck on you new foal coming.. I LOVE DIAMONT MARES they cross well with a ton of stallions.. ..

Loomis will do a good job.. I would love to meet you there what days are you going to be visiting? Well actually i hope he is not there long..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 31
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 12:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ann,

Peabody is good, but still not getting up on his own. And frankly the vet thinks he's not trying all that hard because he's gotten a little spoiled and expects help whenever he wants to nurse. It's a balance between spoiling him or leaving him and then him getting himself scraped up or not enough milk. All his blood work and x-rays are good. They think the tendon will stretch out with exercise. He is on antibiotics, no IV fluids and the sores are beginning to heal.

He'll be there at least two more days I think, the little rascal. He's turning into a real prince.

If I go, it will be on Friday or maybe I will be picking him up to bring him home that day.

I don't know the rules on posting. Are we able to exchange personal emails so we can be in touch and can I give you my website address? I'd love to meet you.

Here is a picture of D'Lady, my 17.1h Diamont mare. She is half sister via her Mom to the Grand Prix jumper and Hanoverian Stallion, Palladium.


D'Lady
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LL
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 253
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 9:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne: what a beautiful BEAUTIFUL mare!

All the best for Peabody's (I love that name) speedy recovery,

Lynn
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 15923
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 9:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello all, private emailing is left up to the individual member and controlled by whether you publish your email address in your profile. The default when you join is to hide your email so this must be turned on by the member.

I have been watching this discussion, a bit worried about the foal Susan, but the initial advice seemed very supportive so I let my worries ride. It looked like things were going well but the downward turn is concerning. Hope that the news from the hospital continues to be good and thanks for keeping us appraised. I look forward to getting back home tomorrow and being able to view the images. My connections right now are so slow that images tend to time me out.
DrO
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1424
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 10:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

For your sake, I certainly hope so too! All the best of luck.
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Catherine MCourt
New Member
Username: Kstud

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 12:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Suzanne,
We have a dedicated foaling unit on our farm and foal a lot of warmblood crosses and the problem that Peabody has is very very common. The traditional Irish Draught and Thoroughbred cross (I am in ireland)never seems to have the same problems and my personal belief is that foals by German and Dutch stallions tend to inherit their large joints, which wobble precariously on the fine bone underneath until everything strengthens up. Whenever we have a mare foaling to a Foreign bred sire now we put them in a loose shed (30ft x15ft) with deep litter and then a huge bed of clean straw on top. The foal is able to find its feet without slipping and so there are no bangs or scrapes, and the size of the shed means that they can skip around it and strengthen up quicker than in a stable. They are put out into a grassy level paddock for a few hours daily too. Since doing this we have had no more problems and by the time they are a week old they can fit back into a normal routine. They really do get very lazy though, and very quickly if they think you will lift them up! Peabody looks beautiful, such a lovely face
Catherine
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Suzanne Reed
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Username: Sureed

Post Number: 32
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 1:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Lynn, She is gorgeous and beyond huge. Unfortunately, she had EPM as a foal and never had a performance career. She trots sound but is somewhat compromised neurologically.

Thanks Dr. O. Peabody will be staying at the hospital as long as he needs to get safely on his way. I was encouraged that he was not so hydrated and did not need IV fluids and that all the bloodwork and x-rays were normal. So it seems we are dealing with and episode and not a permanent condition. I will continue to keep you posted. Let me know what you think of the pictures. Hope you are on a pleasant vacation.

Thanks Sara, keep you fingers crossed for me. Apparently it is the TB/WB cross that precipitated this situation. Hopefully, with D'Lady being a Hanoverian, we won't have the same issues. However, she is scheduled to be bred to Coconut Grove, the only TB stallion in the US approved for Hanoverian breeding. I wonder if I should prepare for similar issues next year? The TB influence is important to me as I am trying to maintain some refinement in my lines. However, Valentine is being rebred to an Andalusian as part of my business partner's breeding program. She is breeding for Dressage, I am breeding for Hunter/Jumper.

Catherine, thank you for the information. I am pleased to know my situation is not unique and that the foals do prospect. I will talk to my business partner (who owns the facility) about setting something similar to that up. It would also benefit my Hanoverian mare, whom according to her former owner, may need some help getting up after foaling. I wish I had been aware of this situation earlier and I could have prepared better. This has been a learning experience.

Thank you all,

Suzanne
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Ann
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Username: Dres

Post Number: 834
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 3:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Great photo, that was taken at Glenwood Farms inspection? Diamont's tend to run tall and big boned.. you will need some refinement added.. I have seen Coconut Grove in person at his inspection.. .He is getting older and was approved mainly on his show career.. ..This should be a good match.. !!

Waiting for good news re Peabody..

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 33
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 4:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, I need the refinement for sure. Plus I am so devoted to TBs which is what I rode when growing up, I don't want to lose that "look."

I'm not sure where that photo was taken. D'Lady was in VT when I came across her. She had gone from Glenwood to Ohio and then to VT. She was inspected twice as the EPM effects did not allow her into the Main Mare Book the first time. I think this is the second inspection. She is 12 now.

I haven't gotten today's call yet, but I am thinking no news is good news. I hope the little fella isn't so spoiled that he won't try hard to get up on his own. We could be staying at the Ritz for what this is costing me.

Suzanne
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Christos Axis
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Username: Christos

Post Number: 1034
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 5:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

They can get very funny with staying down, Suzanne.

My 2yo colt also had long legs and developed the habit of waiting to be lifted on to them.

I even had the bright imprinting idea, on his second day, to lift him up off his legs until he quit fighting it. Well, he quit for good. His attitude became something like "you want me over there, boss, no problem, carry me". The only way to get him on his legs was to put a halter on him and tell him to get up. Otherwise he'd stay down, enjoying your pushing and rolling him around the box in a desperate attempt to get him on his legs.

Even now, when you enter the stall in the morning he'll stay down, grunting, moaning and stretching cutely to be petted. It can scare the stuffing out of you if you do not know him. Sometimes I sit on him to have my morning coffee, lie down with him for some time until we get to work, pick his hooves, roll him and other such stupidities.

Really, I have no idea how I will persuade this horse to be serious when real work will start.
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 34
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 - 11:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oh Christos, you made me laugh. I hope this colt doesn't expect me to lift him when he weighs a few more pounds. Now I've got the vision of you sitting there on your horse having your coffee.

I imprinted my Appy/TB baby and he was always willing to take a nap with me. See below.

Peabody news from the vet is good. He got up on his own a few times, but sounds like he is still spoiled. Vet says the sores look awful but will heal, especially when he is up and around routinely. Right now they are having trouble keeping meds on them because Valentine licks him so much. They put it on every hour and when they come back, Val has it all over her.

I am really going to school on this one.

Thanks for all,

SuzanneDay oneFive months
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1431
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 - 12:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, as you must know by now I'm an "Arab person" but I really like the look of your horses.
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 35
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 - 12:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sara,

I grew up in CT where H/J was the norm, and didn't start riding until I was 13 and 5'8" (I'm 5'10" now) so Arabs weren't in the picture, but I moved to SE WA where someone gave me an Anglo Arab that I rode all over the desert and she was great. I taught her to jump and we always had fun. I tried to breed her to a TB, but she didn't take, so that was the end of the line for me with Arabs, but I still have deep affection for the Arab qualities and am always happy to see a little dish in my horses.

Thanks for your support.

Suzanne
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 38
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 - 11:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peabody Update.

He is doing fine and coming home Friday. He is healing well but won't be ready for the Summer Inspection so we will hold off until Fall.

Thanks Ann for meeting me at Loomis and admiring the colt. I appreciate all of your encouragement.

I promise to post one more time with a picture after I get him home. You can also follow his progress at our website: www.serpentinefarm.com

Thanks to all for you information and support.

Suzanne

Suzanne
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1463
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Jun 29, 2006 - 11:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne, so glad he's going home!!
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 42
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 2:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I wanted to let you all know that Peabody has been home for two weeks now and is doing great. We are still bandaging the hocks to keep him from rubbing open the sores there, but everything is healing up nicely and his hair is growing in brown and not white, so I won't have to get out the hair dye for inspection.

Also, I had a filly born on Friday. She was on her feet within 15 minutes and is also doing great. So that is it for foaling season for me.

Thank you everyone for your help and support. I hope you and your horses are all doing well. See pictures of Peabody and Leibschen (Libby) below (2 of each).

SuzannePeabody 1Peabody 2Libby 1Libby 2
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Fran C
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Username: Canter

Post Number: 555
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 8:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wonderful news to go along with your darling pictures! So glad Peabody is doing so well.
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Ann
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Username: Dres

Post Number: 866
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 9:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Suzanne..... BEAUTIFUL....

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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LL
Member
Username: Frances

Post Number: 265
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 11:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lovely pics Suzanne, and what good news!
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1554
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 12:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wonderful news and great pictures!
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Aileen
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Username: Sunny66

Post Number: 1289
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 1:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Great to hear Suzanne! Your foals are beautiful and what LEGS! :-)
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DJ
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Username: Djws

Post Number: 80
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, Jul 17, 2006 - 7:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Beautiful babies! And life goes on...
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Patricia Bell
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Username: Boomer

Post Number: 71
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 18, 2006 - 3:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Susan, where did the spots come from? Is this one a Appy/TB cross? I'm confused, I looked up Westphalian (because I have never heard of that breed) and it states solid color and I have TB's and we know they aren't spotted. Just curious, he is absolutely beautiful whatever cross he is! I'm glad your situation has improved. I have a TB in foal due next June. I bred her with Friesian imported from Germany 6 years ago. Great sport horses as well. :-)
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Suzanne Reed
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Username: Sureed

Post Number: 43
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 18, 2006 - 3:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks all for your gracious comments.

Patricia, Westphalian is a Warmblood. This is a Pablo foal (see www.rainbowequus.com). Pablo is approved for Hanoverian and Oldenburg breeding. Peabody's Mom is TB and not approved in a Warmblood registry so both Mom and colt have to go through inspection. Hopefully she will be approved so the colt can be registered Oldenburg.

When Peabody couldn't get up, he managed to rub some awful, large sores on his hips, hocks, and elbows. I was concerned that all of the hair would grow back white, as sometimes happens. But it is all coming in brown so far (he is bay). Inspection isn't until October 1, so I think we will be good to go by then.

Thanks for your interest and kind remarks.

Suzanne
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Patricia Bell
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Username: Boomer

Post Number: 72
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 18, 2006 - 4:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I loved your site and you have some stunning horses, Susan.
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Christos Axis
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Username: Christos

Post Number: 1196
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 18, 2006 - 5:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I love peabody's expression. Very noble. Fine horses, Suzanne.
What's the grey you're riding in your profile picture?
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 44
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, Jul 18, 2006 - 6:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Patricia, so I don't get undo credit, I wanted to say that the Rainbow Equus site I sent you to is where the stallions I have bred to stand. I only wish it were mine. I'm based at Serpentine Farm, www.serpentinefarm.com, and we do have some very nice horses there too!

Christos,

Alas, that is my 6 yr old. TB gelding Alex. He was Reserve Champion Baby Green Hunter with my trainer on him in his first show and we were Long Stirrup (that is for 18 and over riders jumping low fences) Champion in his second show. But I am 58 years old and he has proven a little much for me. Plus, my trainer wants me on something bigger (I am 5'10"). So now I am leasing Brock (see below) and Alex is for sale. My recent experience with TBs is what has led me into Warmblood breeding (but trying to keep the TB influence).

Suzanne

Brock
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Christos Axis
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Username: Christos

Post Number: 1197
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 8:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I should have known. From all the horses on this planet, I always fall in love with the &%*#$ Thoroughbred .

Beautiful horse, Suzanne.
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 45
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 10:32 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Don't I know it Christos, me too. That is why I am trying to keep the TB influence in my warmbloods. It breaks my heart to sell Alex but he will do better with a younger and/or more seasoned rider. Here he is up close and over fences (Photo by Field).Alex head shotAlex over fences
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Shawna
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Username: Qh4me

Post Number: 166
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 12:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Beautiful babies...and horses Suzanne!
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Fran C
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Username: Canter

Post Number: 562
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 12:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My first horse was a TB so I completely understand why anyone would fall in love with them. There's something very special about a beautiful TB!
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Patricia Bell
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Username: Boomer

Post Number: 73
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 4:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Gotta 2nd the TB being an awesome horse. I have two and both have stole my heart. If they weren't such darn hard keepers :-) My mare will lose weight just thinking about it. But I wouldn't trade them for anything.
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 46
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 6:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, I see I am not alone in my love for TBs, but has anyone (my age) noticed that they seem to be a lot hotter theses days than they were 40-years ago? When I learned to ride we were all on TBs.

Suzanne
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Ann
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Username: Dres

Post Number: 871
Registered: 10-2000
Posted on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2006 - 7:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oh but... Suzanne,, we also rode then without helmets / saddles or had lessons.. Or that is the case with me.. We had no fear/ or clue the danger of riding... We are WISER not just older now.. LOLOLOL

On the first day God created horses, on the second day he painted them with spots..
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Sharon
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Username: Shanson

Post Number: 33
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Thursday, Jul 20, 2006 - 3:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'd sure like to meet one of those thoroughbreds I hear about that are sane and quiet, but the only ones I've met are hot and sensitive and require advanced riders. I have a friend who'd love to find one of the quiet ones, but can't. She fell in love with the breed when she was a lot younger and braver. Now, she needs a quieter horse for pleasure riding and can't bring herself to look at another, more suitable, breed. There MUST be something extra special about thoroughbreds...
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Sara Wolff
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Username: Mrose

Post Number: 1564
Registered: 1-2000
Posted on Thursday, Jul 20, 2006 - 3:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sharon, there IS something extra special about TBs...it's all that Arabain blood they have!!

My doctor (MD) raises TBs and TBcrosses and her horses, for the most part, are very sweet and calm. However, they get LOTS of turnout and riding, including trails in the mountains, jumping, etc. For the most part they live in large fields with run-ins, and are seldom shut up.
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Linda S.
Member
Username: Banthony

Post Number: 98
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Thursday, Jul 20, 2006 - 3:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm the same way. I have friends that are always trying to talk me into another breed. But I grew up with thoroughbreds and I am hooked on them. I love everything about them - they way they look, the way they move, their intelligence, their big eye, everything.

Also, thoroughbreds have so much heart. I think they get that from their Arabian blood. They will try for you until they drop.

The thoroughbreds that don't come off the track are definitely different. That experience changes them forever. My thoroughbred has a huge trust issue and does not like most men. It took him years before he fully trusted me. He is a bit of a tough ride.

But saying that... we have a 4 yr old thoroughbred filly raised on the farm. She was so calm to train for anything on the ground we were anticipating an easy horse to ride. We thought she was too sweet and laid back to run.
We got a surprise - she is hot as a fire cracker!
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sureed

Post Number: 47
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Thursday, Jul 20, 2006 - 7:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Ann for pointing that out - the getting older part .

Yes, Alex is off the track and also a Storm Cat, which I am told also accounts for some of the 'tude. I did have a lovely TB mare I bought from her breeder. She was never raced. She was Affirmed's Grand-Daughter and she was so sweet and easy to train. She looked just like Affirmed too. I sold her to an older gentleman (meaning about my age), who rides her in beginning eventing and just loves her to pieces. But that is the other problem, I sold Charm because at 16.1 and refined she was too small for me, according to my trainer. It's hard to find a good, meaty 16.3+h TB. Again, things have changed. When I was younger 16h was considered a BIG horse.

To tie this back to Peabody (foal that couldn't get up), that is what I am trying to get -- some of the TB qualities -- with my Warmblood breeding program, so us oldsters (and bigsters) can have our cake and eat it too. I am a little concerned with the info that the Warmblood/TB cross can produce the problem of not being able to get up that Peabody had and this has been confirmed by my vet who said they had another foal just like Peabody in ICU for the same reason the month before I brought Peabody in and they have seen the condition several times before. My Hanoverian mare is being bred to a TB stallion for next year's foal, so I am going to have to watch out for this issue and be better prepared to deal with it.

Happy trails all.

Suzanne
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