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Discussion on How to build cavalletti

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alison brown
Member
Username: Aliazb

Post Number: 6
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 29, 2004 - 12:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I know this seems like it should be so simple that no explanation is required, but nonetheless. Does anyone have specific details (pictures would be qreat) for building cavalletti. How big should the X be and how to fasten it to get the most variety. Thanks.
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Jean Sheiness
Member
Username: Ladera

Post Number: 24
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Dec 29, 2004 - 11:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Alison,

If you placed a search under" cavaletti dimensions" several web sites would show you the different styles of cavalettis. One of the web site will direct you to amazon .com . If you enter the following web site:www.texashorsemansdirectory.com/thdcav.htm ,You will find the dimensions, material and pictures to build a cavaletti . Good Luck.
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alison brown
Member
Username: Aliazb

Post Number: 7
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Thursday, Dec 30, 2004 - 10:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Jean,
Thanks so much that is perfect.
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Christos Axis
Member
Username: Christos

Post Number: 563
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Thursday, Dec 30, 2004 - 2:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The instruction in Jean's link is for the most widely used type of cavaletti.
I must note, however, for what it's worth, that I disagree with this type of cavaletti for two reasons: It is too heavy to move all the time for different exercises and it is dangerous in case of a fall.
One more thing is that all these height options are not really necessary. I believe 7-8 inches at the top of the rail is really perfect for walk and trot excercises.
The 17 inch height is low jumping, not cavaletti work, therefore I believe it shouldn't be fixed. It is safer to use proper verticals, especially in the very beginning of jumping.
To make cavaletti 7-8 inches high, you only need to fasten a 15 inch 4X4 piece perpendicular under each end of your 4 inch diameter ground poles. Just nailing the end of the pole to the middle of the 15 inch piece will do, though a bolt is more proper. Do not worry about notches, mortises or glues to secure these "feet" at a right angle and do not tighten the bolt fully. They will not rotate under normal work, they will rotate if you fall on them and it is actually easier for storage if they can be rotated to line up with the pole.

All the best,
Christos
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Skeller
Member
Username: Skeller

Post Number: 13
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Friday, Dec 31, 2004 - 7:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

What about cavaletti made from PVC pipe? Do these work well? Should they be filled with sand to make them heavier?
Sandi
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 11748
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Saturday, Jan 1, 2005 - 9:27 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

We use "thick walled" 6" diameter pvc for cavaletti and jump poles and find they work pretty well: the kids can move them around easily.
DrO
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Imogen Bertin
Member
Username: Imogen

Post Number: 606
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, Jan 5, 2005 - 5:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The only thing about using plastic is that some horses learn they can be easily knocked without any ill effect and develop little respect for "showjumping poles" as a result...

Imogen
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Heidi Wright
Member
Username: remmi

Post Number: 19
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Monday, Apr 14, 2008 - 10:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

If you choose to build your cavaletti and jumps with wood, but want a lighter weight wood, what would you recommend? At my barn there are some jump poles that are heavier than others, however the barn owner does not know what kind wood they are.

Thanks.
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Chris
Member
Username: stevens

Post Number: 525
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Monday, Apr 14, 2008 - 11:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just guessing, but I would think that soft woods, like pine, would be lighter than hard woods. Price is probably the best indicator; lighter poles should be cheaper initially, but they aren't likely to last as long either.

One way to find out would be to go to the lumber yard and pick up (literally) a bunch of different poles and see which are lighter.

However, please see Imogen's comment above. They should be heavy enough to make an impression should the horse hit them.
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Muffi Delaney
Member
Username: muffi

Post Number: 222
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Monday, Apr 14, 2008 - 6:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I made some - or thought I was making some -with PVC as the poles and regular 2 * 4's as the axis point - I made these little 12" x's with and thought they would stand up in the Dirt with the PVC Pole on top -- Boy did I learn fast. It would not stand - but i just wanted something for them to walk over to learn to pick up their feet. so I took the X's and shoved one end in the PVC on each side to keep the poles stationary on the ground and they my clip them some with their feet but they try not to and it has really worked out well. I made my own jump standards too with 2*4's for feet and 4 * 4's for posts. Jump cups are cheap drill holes with a Drill and use the same PVCs for the poles. yes they learn they dont; get hurt when they hit them but the also learn praise when they Don't hit them - that works better for me.
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Lilo
Member
Username: lilo

Post Number: 771
Registered: 4-2000
Posted on Monday, Apr 14, 2008 - 10:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

About PVC poles - I made some cavalettis (rather, my husband did) with them, and what I don't like is when they splinter, they have really sharp edges. As far as I am concerned, wood is the better option.
Lilo
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Muffi Delaney
Member
Username: muffi

Post Number: 225
Registered: 1-2006
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 15, 2008 - 6:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I guess that i have been lucky - never had a PVC Pole splinter on me. I am a back yard rider and don't use them all the time. perhaps they get more use in your place Lilo.
thanks for the insite.
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Lilo
Member
Username: lilo

Post Number: 772
Registered: 4-2000
Posted on Tuesday, Apr 15, 2008 - 8:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Muffi - you have been lucky. Also, some PVC may not deteriorate as much being out in the sun as others. But, unfortunately, mine did not hold up well.
Lilo
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