Better information makes for healthier horses,
Horseadvice.com is where equine science and horse sense intersect.

Discussion on Horse sways while hoof trimming

Use the navigation bar above to access articles and more discussions on this topic.
Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lori
Member
Username: maggienm

Post Number: 608
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Saturday, Dec 15, 2007 - 9:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a problem with one of my mares I need some help with.
She picks up her feet very nicely, the problem is she is not very patient. Before I have finished 'picking' she pulls her hoof, I hold on and reposition.
The other thing she will do is sway, I have her foot securely between my knees and she sways/rocks back and forth. Not enough to pull away but enough to make me glad I have sea legs!
She will start this within a few minutes of her hoof being up.
She does it with each foot every time.
Thanks for your ideas.

Lori
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: alden

Post Number: 469
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Saturday, Dec 15, 2007 - 10:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lori,

If you have a round pen this works very well for me.

Take the horse, hoofpick, hammer and a loose shoe into the center of the round pen. If the horse doesn't move off with just a hand cue then take a small whip also.

I start by asking for the foot, if the horse complies then I'll proceed to picking, tapping with the hammer (hold the loose shoe over the foot and tap the shoe). If at anytime the horse refuses to give the foot, pulls their foot away or walks off then I send them off for 2-3 laps of the pen.

After each lap session bring her back the center and start where you left off. I've found even my most energetic horses will stand much better for a trim after just a session or two and I've had a couple that understood after just a couple laps!

It's very important to send them off on laps immediately after refusing to give a foot or pulling the foot away. They'll learn they get rest by standing quiet.

I have done this with just a halter and lead rope, but it's more difficult.

Good day,
Alden
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dorothea D. Linklater
Member
Username: deedles5

Post Number: 12
Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Monday, Dec 17, 2007 - 1:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Maybe what she is objecting to is standing on the remaining three feet. Are you close enough in that the foot isn't pulled sideways from the knee?
Is she standing square enough that she doesn't feel unbalanced? Could she have sensitivity issues in the other foot? It sounds like she is uncomfortable, not impatient.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1516
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Monday, Dec 17, 2007 - 3:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lori,

I have a horse that does that also, she is 5 and I've had her for 4 1/2 years. I think it's partly a balance problem, and in my case, this horse has some left over fears that affect this part of her training. What is the history on your horse? Mine was left to fend for herself at an early age and was nothing but bones when we got her. She had some injury to a back foot, can see scar tissue and thickening there. I just take my time with her, never get angry. If she sways, I just go with her. If on the rear feet, she tries to pull away, same thing, I just gently hold on. I try to rest her foot where ever she is most comfortable for trimming. Just for cleaning out her feet, doing it while she eats her grain makes that easy. But she used to be awful even for that part, so it's taken a long time.

Alden's ideas (he's good with this stuff!) will also work if it's just a training issue; I've done that also with this mare but it seems to just be one of those things she is weird about and in her case, she's not being bad so much as being worried. Do his suggestions and see if she's better. If not go back to being patient in case it's a pain/balance issue. Try cleaning her feet held lower, or resting on something. I use a homemade hoof stand which is a 6 x 6 post on a 12" square base. She will rest her front feet on that, but she don't want her rear feet that high. I think it's 14" tall.

Good luck, let us know what works.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lori
Member
Username: maggienm

Post Number: 610
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Monday, Dec 17, 2007 - 6:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Alden great idea, I didn't think about sending her off because she isn't refusing to pick up her foot or even yanking it away, just swaying(musical notes)
I have had this girl since she was a long yearling, her training is all mine. So I have to take the credit for her misbehaving as well.
I would consider discomfort except she does it with all her feet. This is the mare I have taught to climb on a box, I don't think balance is a problem.
Somehow I just taught her she could get away with it.
She will put her nose down to me and watch what I am doing, she remains very relaxed so I don't think fear is at work here either.
Has your mare improved Angie?
Thanks for the ideas.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Angie J.
Member
Username: ajudson1

Post Number: 1518
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 18, 2007 - 8:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, she has improved. The first year or so I had her, we had to lean her against the wall to trim her. This is when I had a farrier yet. She couldn't seem to stand up, and she was terrified of having her foot up, any foot. I think she got tangled in something before I had her and that is why I say it is fear in her more than it being her misbehaving.

Her main problem now is with the front feet; she tends to keep it up and keep flinging it towards her stomach instead of letting it down to rest. Very weird! Again, I believe it's a fear thing and needing to relax. She is soo much better though; trust me, I am very slow at this do it myself trimming so she really has become much more patient.

If your mare sways, perhaps a jab in the stomach and a firm "NO" will help. Just a little something to get her attention and shape her up? It may just be a laziness issue...if you have been helping her stand up and she's used to leaning on you? That may or may not work, depending on her disposition. My mare gets worse if I do that.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: alden

Post Number: 470
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, Dec 18, 2007 - 8:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lori,

My suggestion was based on your original post, I see in it she pulls her foot before you can finish cleaning the hoof.

I found some horses like to watch, like you say she puts her nose right in the work to see what's going on. My buckskin is this way and she did sway early on, I think she was swaying around to see better. A patient farrier is also a big help :-)

Again I did similar as my first post, but in the case of curiosity rather than 'I had enough' you have to modify your response. I'd wait until the curiosity becomes a problem then send her off. Mine learned pretty quick where she crossed the line.

I never have stop her from breathing in the farriers ear though, or anyone else's ear that close enough to get her nose near. It drives my wife nuts and the mare knows it :-)

Good day,
Alden
Post a Message to this Discussion
Posting
Instructions:
Full Service Members may post to this discussion and should address the orignial poster's concerns or other information posted here. New questions about your horse should be started in a new discussion. Use the navigation bar at the top of this page to return to the parent article and review the article and existing discussions. If your question remains unanswered "Start a New Discussion", the link is under the list of discussions at the bottom of the article.
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username:
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:
Home Page | Todays Discussions | Search | Top of Page Administration
  http://www.horseadvice.com
is The Horseman's Advisor
Helping Thousands of Equestrians, Farriers, and Veterinarians Every Day
All rights reserved, © 2014
Horseadvice.com is a BBB Accredited Business. Click for the BBB Business Review of this Horse Training in Stokesdale NC