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Discussion on Tying young colt

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Heidi Magnuson
Member
Username: Heidim

Post Number: 52
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 - 1:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've had success teaching my five-month old colt to lead using techniques found on this Web site. Now what about tying him? At what age is it safe to do so? My plan is to use either the overhead line or the tire tube, but I keep hearing about how how fragile young necks are and so don't want to start too soon.
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Stina
Member
Username: Stina

Post Number: 20
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 - 1:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

You can safely begin teaching your colt to tie by using a long lead rope or lunge line and a ring mounted to solid wall. You attach your long line to the colt's halter and then you thread the long line through the ring on the wall. With this configuration you start standing right along side the colt and gradually increase your distance. When the colt is standing still there is slack in the line. As soon as the colt pulls back, you gently resist allowing him some freedom, but don't allow the line to pull through the ring more than a foot or so. In this way, he gradually learns to give to the resistance on the line without hurting his neck. It also tends to reduce the panic attack some horses feel when they have no ability to flee. Gradually you increase the duration of time he stands tied and what you do with him while he tied. The length in the line allow you to walk quite a distance from the colt, walk behind him, pick up his feet, and brush him. The only thing to be careful of, is that neither of you get caught up excess line. Make sure to keep it coiled short enough so that neither of you get your feet caught up in it. I also recommend the ring be mounted on a wall in a stall so that if the colt should get loose, he can't run far with a long line in tow which would inevitably scare the dickens out of him.
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Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: Alden

Post Number: 198
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 - 1:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Heidi,

I think you can start tying him anytime, the key at his age is attention span, just don't tie him for a long time. If he is with his dam still (or use a good calm gelding), I'd tie them together he may stay calmer. I like using a high-line or the 'Blocker Tie Ring', I believe the ring has a real advantage over an inner tube.

The key to his training is timing the 'release', a high-line and the ring 'release' when the colt stops pulling. In other words when the colt stops pulling the forces are neutral, an inner tube continues to pull even after the colt stops; no 'release'.

I've also used the ring on camping trips tying to the trailer for several days at a time with a problem. It is handy to be able to adjust the length easily for feeding and what not.

Good day,
Alden
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Suzanne Reed
Member
Username: Sr26953

Post Number: 21
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 - 3:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Where can I get a blocker tie ring?

Thanks,

Suzanne
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Holly Wood
Member
Username: Hwood

Post Number: 785
Registered: 3-2001
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 - 4:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi, Suzanne,

Try www.blockerranch.com
Ted Blocker is the person who invented the ring. I was told that a major tack manufacturer was looking at manufacturing it for Ted after he started introducing it, and I that happened although, I believe, it is a different company than the one I was first told was interested. If so, then it would be available in some of the tack supply catalogs.
Clinton Anderson's Downunder Horsemanship site also has the ring, but may be more expensive.
It really does work.
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Alden Chamberlain
Member
Username: Alden

Post Number: 199
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 - 7:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I want to add my two cents worth to Stina's comment about the rope scaring the colt. If the colt isn't prepared before hand the rope may well scare him. But, I strongly recommend the colt be prepared and 'sacked out' if you will with ropes before teaching them to tie. Why use a piece of equipment that's going to scare him and very possibly set your training schedule way back.

I'd suggest you touch, rub and throw ropes all around, over and under your colt before moving on to tying. Do this until it is just on of those things and he could care less where and what that rope is doing. Some horse get pretty excited so just work through it, then there's the horses that just don't care what you do. Either way ropes are a fact of life for most horses their entire life.

Clinton's website did have the Blocker ring, do a google search there are several hits. $18.49 is the cheapest price is see.

Good day,
Alden
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Robert N. Oglesby DVM
Moderator
Username: Dro

Post Number: 13819
Registered: 1-1997
Posted on Thursday, Sep 29, 2005 - 7:27 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I personally think that it is safer to teach young horses to tie than older horses. The stronger and heavier horses are more likely to get into trouble fighting a tie than a foal or yearling.
DrO
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Heidi Magnuson
Member
Username: Heidim

Post Number: 53
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Thursday, Sep 29, 2005 - 8:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wow, I got way more help than I expected. Thanks for the feedback.
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